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  • Foodie | North Cyprus Whatsonintrnc

    Foodie > Ayran Ceviz Macun Hellim Kup Kebab Olives Raki Recipes - Mezze Recipes - Soups Sunday Lunch Brandy Sour Coffee Hellimli Lahmacun Pekmez Recipes - Chicken Recipes - Pasta & Rice Recipes - Vegetarian Vineyard Hotel cafés Costa Cuisine Hummus Meze Pilavuna Recipes - Desserts Recipes - Salads Restaurants Wineries Çakısdez Food Tours Kolokas Molohiya Prickly Pear Recipes - Meat Recipes - Seafood Seftali Kebab Zinavia Foodie > Ayran The perfect partner for your lahmacun has to be a refreshing glass of Aryan , one of the most popular drinks of the Turks since the discovery of Yogurt among the Turkish tribes in Central Asia. It's simply made by diluting yogurt with water and adding salt to taste. Drenched over crushed ice and garnished with a mint leaf, it’s the ideal drink to quench your thirst. It accompanies any meal or is drunk by itself. It's common in all regions of North Cyprus, the only variation being its thickness. Try fresh Ayran (taze yapilmis Ayran) for the best experience. ​ Ingredients 250 gr (8 oz) thick sheep's milk yogurt 150 ml (1/4 pint) cold water A little salt Mint - dried or fresh ​ Preparation Put all the ingredients, eexcept the mint, in a blender and blend for 1-2 minutes until smooth and lightly frothy. Alternatively, beat in a bowl with an egg whisker, until well amalgamated. Pour evenly to each glass and put some mint on every glass to serve. Top Foodie > Brandy Sour A mixture of brandy and cordial made from lemons of the Güzelyurt region, Brandy Sour is considered the national cocktail. It's made with Cypriot brandy which is milder than Cognac or Armagnac, lemons fresh or cordial, Angostura bitters, soda water and ice. Bitter lemons are used locally to produce a bitter-sweet lemon cordial – the same lemons used by British author Lawrence Durrell for the title of his famous novel "Bitter Lemons of Cyprus ", written next to Bellapais Abbey in the 1950’s. Although Brandy Sour is enjoyed worldwide, the Cypriot version is unique for the local brandy used. It was introduced in the 1930’s in an old hotel in the Troodos Mountains, as an alcoholic substitute for iced tea, as a way of disguising the preference for Western-style cocktails of their distinguished guest, King Farouk of Egypt . As well as enjoying it during your visit to the island, why not pick up a bottle of Cypriot brandy and try making it back home. Top Foodie > Cafés Top Foodie> Çakisdez These unique green olives are manually cracked using special stones. Olives have long been recognised as a symbol of good living and people tend to live longer and healthier lives in regions where olive oil is a staple part of the diet. Harvest time usually begins in October, when the early green olive first fruits are gathered either by shaking the branches over sheets spread on the ground around the tree, or by individually picking the olives by hand. A popular delicacy, Çakısdez (chuck-ess-dez ), are picked, washed, cracked, soaked in brine then served with coriander seeds, garlic, olive oil and lemon, and complement any appetiser for lunch or dinner, although you'll most likely find them at open buffets for breakfast. Chakistes can be preserved in jars or plastic containers, so you can take some back home. Top Foodie > Ceviz Macun A famous Cypriot fruit preserve of small green walnuts , this spoon sweet is a local favourite. Fruit preserves, generally served in little plates or on miniature forks, are an inherent part of local culture, where they're offered to guests as an act of hospitality. Almost all fruits, nuts and even vegetables can be made into a preserve. Ceviz Macun is made with unripe walnuts when they're green and tender, usually at the end of Spring or early summer, when the inner shell is still soft. Making it is labour intensive, lasting a week from branch to table, but well worth the while. Walnuts are known to give the body energy and contribute to the sexual health of men, so eat them one at a time! Served as a dessert at most local dineries, they can also be found jarred in supermarkets, and make a healthy treat to take back home. Top Foodie > Coffee Culture Coffee in Northern Cyprus is a way of life as well as an experience. Turkish coffee or Kahve (ka-veh) brews ground coffee very finely. Arabica varieties are onsidered the best, but robusta or blends are also used. It's made by bringing the powdered coffee, with water and usually sugar, to the boil in a custom pot called cezve , or ibrik . As soon as it froths it's taken off the heat, but can be reheated to increase the froth. Sugar is added while brewing, so the amount of sugar must be specified before preparing. It may be served unsweetened (sade ), with little or moderate sugar (orta ), or sweet (şekerli ), but cream or milk are never added. Often served with chocolate or Turkish delight and a small glass of water to wash off any coffee residue in the mouth, Kahve traditionally comes in small porcelain cups called a fincan and is sipped slowly. Superstition says the grounds can be used for fortune-telling. The cup is turned over into the saucer and the patterns created are interpreted to have a glimpse into the future of the person who drank it. Kahve can also offer health benefits. Known to balance cholesterol levels, it can help prevent some heart diseases, assist the digestive system and be used in some massages and treatment of skin conditions . Kahve will be offered after a meal in most restaurants and can be found almost everywhere. For an authentic taste, find somewhere where it's made in a cooper pot, over a coal fire. Decorated coffee-cups, coffee-pots and coffee-trays are sought after souvenirs for visitors. Top Foodie > Costa Cuisine The stretch of coastline east from Girne to Tatlisu and beyond, has become known as the "Costa Cuisine " as it has so many fabulous eating places. Below are some of the stars which all food lovers will want to visit. Eagle's Nest @ Kücük Erenkoy Fabulous location directly overlooking the sea. Eat inside if it's breezy or winter, or eat outside on the veranda in the summer to enjoy a truly spectacular sunset which is almost, but not quite, as good as the food. Real care is taken with the food here. You can tell this is a place where food is loved. Everything is beautifully cooked and superbly presented by some of the most professional waiting staff you could hope to have. This is high quality fine dining by any standards but at really good prices. (Example: Chicken Liver Pâté + Grilled mushrooms for starters; Sea Bass + the classic Italian dish Gnocchi for mains; chocolate brownie + apple crumble and ice cream for dessert; + 2 glasses of wine. Everything came to £20 per head. ) A new feature is an outside bar area called the Edge (yup, right over the sea again) which will undoubtedly add even more atmosphere to this quality establishment. This place is special. Go for it! This is undoudbtedly the star of the "Costa Cuisine", and a real credit to the owners, chefs and all the superbly trained waiting staff. ​ Café Paris & Bakery @ Esentepe They say that you can't come to TRNC and not have a Meze. That may be true but add to the list of not to be missed, Cafe Paris. Stunning location at the top of a cliff, overlooking the ocean, with a real infinity pool. But the facilities and the views pale into insignificance compared to the food. Pastries, cakes, freshly baked breads and sandwiches may not seem like something to rave about but wait until you've been here and tried them. This is another shinging star on the "Costa Cuisine" and one to be literally, savoured. ​ Old Shakespeare @ Turquoise Bay The decor is tasteful. The furniture includes a large globe, an old radio and other antiquities which together work to create a really relaxing atmosphere. There is a TV on the wall but don't expect Premier League football in here. Scenes of Northern Cyprus and unobtrusive gentle music help to create a real nice ambience. The menu is definitely eclectic. Executive Chef Oleg creates dishes from France, Italy, Georgia, Russia and Europe. For starters our group had: Chicken Live Pate (beautiful); Beef Carpaccio (beautiful); "Julien" with chicken and mushrooms (beautiful); and mushrooms on the Ketsi Pan baked with cheese and butter which were simply divine. All were truly excellent, beautifully cooked and excellently presented, but if ever there's a mushroom olympics, which is a sporting tournament I could very much get behind, this Ketsi Pan way should easily take the gold. Wow, it’s good. When we asked for a wine list we expected to be given a card, but instead the waiter actually brought all the different bottles for us to look at and choose from. Nice touch. Main courses we had were: Beef Stroganoff; Cod Fillet with Zucchini and Tom Yam sauce; Chicken BBQ. The Stroganoff was really tasty. The cod fillet was delicious. The Tom Yam sauce could have been spicier for us although that's a personal taste. The chicken BBQ was also delicious. Enjoying the meal so much, we ordered another bottle of wine and decided to try some of the desserts. Lemon Tiramisu is a wonderful variation on this classic. Instead of being coffee based, it's lemon based, reflecting Northern Cyprus' classic fruit. And it tastes superb. The Semifreddo (Frozen Chocolate Cream with Pistacchios) was simply stunning. Everything washed down with a limoncello digestivo. Executive Chef Oleg took the time to come out and ask for feedback which he got in spades. Yes, the Cod Fillet could have had a larger side dish with it; yes the chicken bbq might have been a bit more well done to suit our personal taste; yes the Tom Yam sauce wasn't as spicy as we would prefer, but generally we were surprised and delighted at the whole experience. And when the bill came, two bottles of wine, 4 starters, 4 mains and 4 desserts came to a little under £30 per head which we all reckoned was great value for money. Old Shakespeares has only been open a short time and there's still improvements that can be made but will we be going back there? Absolutely! ​ Turtle Paradise Restaurant & Bar @ Alagadi Beach Great location right by the beach. Fairly extensive menu and whatever you choose you'll be fine, although the hamburgers do deserve a special mention. Just good, solid cooking, where everything is tasty but the atmosphere surpasses the food. There's just something about this place which is magical mediterranean at its best. Dip in the sea or just sit with a drink and feel the breeze, this is a place built for relaxation. Plenty of car parking, family friendly. They also have a wonderful little shop which operates in the summer season, selling hand made jewellery, clothing and craft work run by the ever genial Ercan. Another must stop place to visit on the "Costa Cuisine". ​ Esenyali Balik Restoran @ Alagadi Set right beside the beach in the protected village of Aligadi, Esenyali is blessed with a really spectacular location. We had to drive slowly past the herd of goats out for a walk. The venue itself is simple and straight forward, but the set menu Meze certainly isn't. 20 cold courses followed by 5 hot courses (there were so many I couldn't keep up!) all of which were fresh, tasty and delicious. There are plenty of places that do a good Meze but this really should be one you try out. Not only was the food good but the service was exceptionally friendly. The presence of so many locals says it all. Highly recommended. ​ Hurma Restaurant between Acapulco and Elexus Resorts Brilliant restaurant. The meze was outrageously good, although better when shared with 4 (so much). Lovely views and great service. ​ Tuncay'in Yeri Restaurant @ Esentepe You can't come to Northern Cyprus and not have a Meze in a restaurant run by locals, like this. Offerings will differ according to seasonal availability, but at least you'll know everything is fresh. Meze here can be hot or cold and is usually served in batches of 4 or 5, although you might just get served 14 or 15 all at once. You’ll find a great mix of meat and fish with vegetarians especially well catered for. As good a Meze as you can find. Reasonable prices and friendly, efficient service. ​ Moonshire Bar & Restaurant @ Esentepe Location, location, location! Set on the hillside above the new marina and Sun Valley Beachside Resort, this gem of a place is a must visit for tourists and locals alike. While away a sunny afternoon with a wine or beer on one of the outside terraces, or enjoy a romantic meal for two while you watch the sun setting and all the time enjoy authentic family cooking at its best and a genuine friendliness which is a particular hallmark. The menu is international, reflecting its' growing popularity with customers from different countries. Prices represent great value - at the time of writing, a great meal will cost less than 20 Euro per head. Particularly popular with Scandinavians, Germans, Russians, Turks and British. Wide variety of events are always well attended so advance booking is recommended. Ample car parking available. ​ Cengiz's Restaurant & Bar@ Esentepe Returned to Cengiz's for my wife's birthday and what a great decision that was. Cengiz absolutely goes out of his way to give the best experience he can to his customers eg picked up and dropped off so we could both have a drink; organised a cake and sources and bought in special champagne at my request. The salmon starter was very generous in size and really tasty as was the chicken liver pâté. Mexican Steak was exactly as spicy as I requested and the beef stroganoff was delicious. Added to that, the general vibe of this place is really special (a covered courtyard adorned with passion fruit). A star venue of the North Cyprus "Costa Cuisine". Definitely recommended. ​ Spice Garden Restaurant @ Bahceli Great place to watch sport (show 4 events simultaneously) and probably the best Indian food for miles around. Friendly staff and friendly patrons make this a really enjoyable place to visit. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Top Make a Reservation Foodie > Food Tours Discover the culture & people of Northern Cyprus through traditional foods and wine, by taking a journey to some of the island’s hidden food haunts and award winning wineries. Sample authentic snacks, dishes and drinks while exploring mountain villages. Normally in small groups of up to 7 people, tours specialise in food & wine of Cyprus and offer a personal, bespoke experience you won’t forget. Private tours for larger groups are also available on request. What participants say… “We were taken to see a variety of brilliant foodie spots in quaint villages around the Troodos mountains. I’m sure we'd have paid a huge amount more if we'd hired a taxi driver for the day to take us from place to place and that would have been without lunch, entrance fees and tastings included. The planned itinerary and having someone to answer all your foodie questions was a huge plus and the info we were given at the end was really useful.” “We’ve started using private tour guides and small group experiences for our last few trips, as we’ve realised the big buses are not for us. We’re really glad we chose a tour instead of saving a few euros to join a big bus full of people. We were with just 3 others and had a great day, driving through the mountains tasting wine. We were introduced to all the native grape varieties and were able to buy top quality wine at phenomenal prices.” ​ ​ “We'd walked past one of the places out of the many we were taken to on this tour and actually thought about going inside. Even if we'd made a visit to this particular place by ourselves, there’s absolutely no way we would have ordered what our guide chose for us – totally worth it, just for the new tastes and dishes we tried. Absolutely brilliant tour!” ​ “We were taken to a great variety of restaurants on our tour, places that we'd never have found by ourselves. By the end of the night we’d seen so many great places and eaten so many delicious things we were stuffed… Make sure you arrive hungry! Worth EVERY penny” ​ Itineraries Some itineraries list an hour-by-hour schedule and a set of specific stops or locations. Others visit locals and because these local villagers are busy with every day life, can’t guarantee which stops will be included. Tours have themes and a kind-of checklist of what will be included, but the specifics of where you go and what you’ll see often changes. For example, if it’s the season for harvesting olives, then that might be included as one of the promised stops. If one of the locals is baking halloumi bread, this’ll get in as well, so you can meet a real local and experience a true Cypriot kitchen. If its September, that’s the time to walk through the vineyards to see the grape varieties. ​ What You'll Do Tours are normally a full day experience , exploring local villages and wineries, with an authentic meze lunch, delicous food and exquisite wine tastings. Your local guide will pick you up and drive you around. You’ll also get to visit traditional product workshops, taste Cypriot delicacies such as halloumi cheese, honey, olive oil, village breads, traditional sweets, and of course wine. You’ll get to learn about the ingredients, the making process and the traditions linked to the products before trying them. Part of the experience is visiting villages, where you’ll have time to explore the sites and take in stunning landscapes. Along the way you’ll usually stop at a local tavern to feast on a selection of Cypriot dishes with a full meze lunch. This is sure to be an authentic experience that will leave you wanting more from a foodie day like no other! Top Foodie > Hellim Hellim is a traditional food that has been produced locally for centuries and is well known worldwide for its unique taste. Also referred to as Halloumi , it's a semi-hard, unripened brined cheese made from a mixture of goat’s and sheep’s milk, and sometimes cow’s milk as well. Alongside a distinctive layered texture, it has a high melting point making it easy to fry or grill. This property makes it a popular meat substitute and is moderately high in fat and a good source of protein. Locals enjoy Hellim fresh, grilled, barbequed, with salads, sandwiches, meals and even alongside fruit. Another favourite is grated, sprinkled with dried mint on tubular pasta types like Bucatini, or cooked in a chicken broth. Local cooking culture also revolves around a lot of bread and pastry, and local favourites like Hellimli and Pilavuna also make good use of Hellim within their traditional ingredients. Top Foodie > Hellimli Hellimli is a traditional Cypriot savoury pastry made with Hellim cheese . Consisting of flour, water, salt, butter and olive oil, chopped onions, mint, and diced Hellim cheese. Kneading chunks of the Hellim cheese, onions and mint into a bread dough, the dough is then sprinkled with sesame and nigella seeds, before being baked in a traditional clay oven. The crust of the bread develops a golden colour, ready to be served. You'll come across many bakeries in Northern Cyprus and won’t be disappointed with the choice at hand which make perfect snacks. Top Foodie > Hummus A Levantine food dip or spread made from cooked, mashed chickpeas, blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. Today, it's popular throughout the Middle East, North Africa, and in Middle Eastern cuisine around the globe. ​ Ingredients 1/2 kg chickpeas (soaked overnight) 1 cup tahini (beaten) * 5-6 garlic cloves, crushed 1/4 cup lemon juice Tahini1/2 cup olive oil salt, paprika finely chopped parsley * Note: Tahini is a paste made from ground, hulled sesame seeds used in North African, Greek, Turkish, and Middle Eastern cuisine. Tahini is served as a dip on its own, or as a major component of hummus, baba ghanoush, and halva. Preparation Drain chickpeas, spread on a tea towel and roll a bottle over them to remove the husks. Boil the chickpeas until soft. Dry and mash. Beat the tahini and combine with the chickpeas. Add the crushed garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and salt. If the paste is very thick, add liquid from the chickpeas. Sprinkle with paprika and chopped parsley and pour a little olive oil over the purée. Top Foodie > Kolokas Colocasia esculenta is a perennial, tropical plant primarily grown as a root vegetable for its edible, starchy corm. The vegetables cultivated in Northern Cyprus are much larger than in other countries. Generally, Kolokas is eaten like a potato , as it tastes quite similar when cooked but with a nutty flavour. Be careful handling Kolokas, as the skin and roots are poisonous before they've been cooked and cannot under any circumstances be eaten raw . Often used as a substitute for potato, it's boiled in a tomato sauce or cooked with meat, beans and chickpeas. Overseas it's common to roast, bake, mash or chip them, as many different countries around the world use Kolokas in different ways. Drain chickpeas, spread on a tea towel and roll a bottle over them to remove the husks. Boil the chickpeas until soft. Dry and mash. Beat the tahini and combine with the chickpeas. Add the crushed garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and salt. If the paste is very thick, add liquid from the chickpeas. Sprinkle with paprika and chopped parsley and pour a little olive oil over the purée. Top Foodie > Kup Kebab Also known as Kleftiko , this is a traditional Turkish recipe where lamb is marinated in olive oil, garlic, onions and herbs and slowly cooked in greaseproof paper or foil, keeping all the juices and flavours together. Also referred to by locals as ‘Hirsiz Kebabı’ (Kebab of Thieves), traditionally, lambs or goats in the mountains were stolen then cooked in underground ovens sealed with mud, to disguise the smell and smoke and to avoid detection. The success of this famous dish depends on slow roasting, until the meat fairly falls off the bone. It's usually made with a leg of lamb which becomes very tender once cooked. Though the leaner leg looks impressive and is a cut better suited to faster cooking and served pink, the tougher, fattier shoulder, benefits from slow cooking, becoming wonderfully juicy and rich. Prolonged cooking in a traditional clay oven offers a tender dish that can't be achieved with conventional cooking. Almost always served with Cypriot roast potatoes, some prefer to cook the vegetables together with the meat, for the true flavour and aroma experience. Seasoned with oregano and bay leaves, a little acidity from a squeezed lemon helps to cut through the richness of the meat and potatoes, so you can keep going back for more. Kup Kebab is usually cooked on Sunday’s accompanied by a glass of Turkish Raki and a nap in the shade of a gnarly fig tree afterwards. Top Foodie > Lahmacun Ingredients A pack of pitas 1 lb ground beef 1 lb white onion 1 or 2 tomatoes Salt, black pepper to taste If you can't find tomatoes, replace it with 2 table spoons of tomato puree. ​ Preparation Peel, wash, place onions with tomatoes in food processor and ground. Add salt, black pepper and meat, ground 30 seconds more. With the help of a spoon, spread this mixture over pitas. Put them in oven and bake at 400F about 20-30 minutes. Check to see whether meat is cooked. Serve hot. Top Foodie > Meze You really can't come to Northern Cyprus and not have a Meze. It's the mainstay of traditional cuisine in North Cyprus and basically means appetisers or starters, and there's usually so much of it you won't need a main course. Meze are served in various forms all over the Middle East and certainly the Turkish Cypriot variety have influences recognisable if you've eaten meze in another country, although there are some unique to here. Depending on the time of year, offerings will differ according to seasonal availability, but at least you'll know everything is fresh. Meze can be hot or cold and is usually served in batches of 4 or 5, although you might just get served 14 or 15 all at once. You’ll find a great mix of meat and fish with vegetarians especially well catered for. Some of the more popular and common mezes you might expect to be served: ​ Cacik Pronounced Jajuk, this is a palate cleansing and refreshing dish in summer time. Combining fresh plain yoghurt made from sheep’s milk, finely chopped cucumber, mint and a dash of lemon. Often served along main courses as it’s an excellent accompaniment for meat. Calamar Calamari, usually served with lemon juice and some salt. Chakistes Very popular and definitely a staple of a meze selection. Crushed green olives, served dressed in olive oil, a little crushed garlic, coriander and lemon juice. Often on breakfast menus as well. Dolma/Sarma Stuffed varieties which often feature vine leaves, peppers, courgette flowers or pumpkin flowers which are used as wraps and stuffed with a mix of rice, tomatoes, sultanas, meat, herbs and spices. Very more-ish. Also known as ‘Yalancı Dolma’ (Stuffed Liar) because during the World War 2 no one could afford to stuff things with meat, thus being classed as cheating. Fasülye Beans. Loads of different types of beans served include black eyed beans, green beans, butter beans. Great served hot or cold with yoghurt and bread. Simple but tasty and healthy. ​ Hellim Sheep’s or goats cheese served sliced and grilled or fried . Has a unique taste and when grilled is crispy and chewy with some people finding it tastes a bit like bacon. ​ Hummus Great with bread as a dip on its own, or served with a full meze. Blended chickpeas and tahini paste with various spices to give it quite a sharp flavour. ​ Köfte Meatballs that come in various forms, but usually minced meat, onion and herbs mixed together and either fried, baked or grilled. Bulgur köfte for example, is bulgur wheat used as the outer coating for the meatball and deep fried to make a crisp coating. ​ Molehiya Served as a main course or as part of a meze, Molehiya is a green leaf vegetable unique to Cyprus. The leaves are dried in the sun and then boiled, usually along with pieces of chicken, to make a kind of stew. Quite a bitter taste, but along with a few herbs and spices, it makes for a healthy dish. ​ Mucver Pronounced Mujver, this is a batter mix of courgette flowers, milk and eggs whipped together and small spoonfuls of it then dropped into a hot pan of oil and cooked until crispy on the outside. ​ This is just a selection for you to get the general idea of how delicious a Turkish Cypriot meze meal can be. Others include cracked almonds on ice, salted fish, fresh beetroot, ox tongue, brain, dried meats and other vegetable dishes . There are plenty of traditional Turkish Cypriot restaurants so why not try some. Meze is an important part of social gatherings such as family get-togethers, weddings, parties and other functions, so it's the most popular way of eating for locals. Eat as much or as a little as you like, take your time over it, and don't think you need to finsh the whole lot. Top Foodie > Molohiya The leaves of Corchorus Olitorius , commonly known as Jew’s Mallow, Nalta jute, or Tossa jute. Molohiya is indigenous to Cyprus and was originally found growing on the banks of the River Nile in Egypt, living proof of Egyptian influence on Cyprus. Locals pick and dry the local plant throughout the summer months. Carrying many health benefits, it's cooked with freshly chopped tomato, onions, garlic, lemon juice, lamb or chicken, but can also be served vegetarian. It's a gorgeous traditional dish usually cooked and served at home, but you'll find a few local restaurants serving it during the day in Nicosia’s old walled city. Top Foodie > Olives In Northern Cyprus, as in other Mediterranean countries, the olive tree can be seen everywhere, in the wild and under cultivation. Usually favouring well drained sunny hillsides, olive trees also thrive in backyards and flat plain lands. Olives are an integral part of Cypriot culture and have been cultivated on the island since ancient times. Olive trees live for a long time and have been known to go for over 2,500 years . The oldest Monumental Olive Trees in the village of Kalkanli are an attraction for thousands of visitors each year. The nurture and care of olive trees is of course a matter of some skill. Legend has it that those who eat the fruit of this tree receive its resilience and endurance. Not surprisingly, Cypriots are considered to be long-lived and local life expectancy exceeds European average and other developed countries. Olive products are renowned for their health, vitality and longevity benefits, and olive trees have even had a tremendous impact on global affairs. ​ Green Olives Olive picking season in Cyprus starts early September and continues through to the New Year. The first olives picked are the small green ones. These are washed, cracked and then soaked in brine, and served as a popular delicacy, Chakistes, found in all homes and Cypriot tavernas. If these olives are left on the trees longer, they turn black, and are then used for making olive oil. ​ Olive Oil In ancient times, Cypriots used a heavy stone press with a long wooden handle to produce olive oil. A donkey pushed the handle to rotate the millstone, crushing the fresh olives. Since then the process has changed dramatically and become completely automated, but the essntials remain unaltered: no heating and no chemicals result in the production of high-quality olive oil. ​ Symbol of Peace In North Cyprus the phrase, “to offer someone an olive branch” can be commonly heard, meaning a proposal to make peace with someone. Found in most cultures of the Mediterranean, the olive branch first symbolised representing peace in Ancient Egypt, followed many centuries later in ancient Greek mythology. Even on the “Great Seal of the United States”, the supporter of the shield is a bald eagle grasping an olive branch in its’ right talon, symbolising a preference for peace. A petition adopted by the American Continental Congress in July 1775, was called the “Olive Branch Petition” in the hope of avoiding a full-blown war with Great Britain. ​ Olive Leaf Burning A Turkish Cypriot custom known as ‘Tutsu ’, is the burning of olive leaves. A symbolic act for warding off the evil eye and to protect from harm, a family member gathers leaves into a custom metal pot and then burns them, waving the resulting smoke around people for their protection and well being. ​ Cosmetology Olive oil is widely used not only in the kitchen but also in medicine and cosmetology. Cosmetics made with olive oil are very popular in Northern Cyprus. Soaps, moisturisers, shampoos, shower gels, facial masks and much more are available in and around most towns. Olive oil soaps provide a very clean and smooth silky feel with minimal lather, a moisturising effect that lasts longer time than inorganic cosmetics and is perfect for dry and sensitive skin. As olive oil soap contain effective antioxidant properties, usage stimulates new cell generation, slows down wrinkle development and gives skin a youthful look. ​ Leaf Extract The powerful antioxidants of olive leaf extract are also proven to protect against a variety of viral and bacterial infections. Olive leaf extract capsules claim to improve the regulation of blood pressure, and olive leaf tea helps the digestive system. ​ Gifts Olive oil was a very important part of daily life in the Mediterranean in Roman times It was used for food, as fuel for lamps, and as a basic ingredient in things like medicinal ointment, bath oils, skin oils, soaps, perfumes and cosmetics. Even before Roman times, Cyprus was known for its olive oil, as indicated by the Greek philosopher Strabo when he said that “in fertility Cyprus is not inferior to any one of the islands, for it produces both good wine and good oil”. Olive, olive oils and associated products are popular gifts to take home. Top Foodie > Pekmez The Besparmak Mountains are swarming with carob trees and the sweet thick syrup extracted from the pods are exceptionally tasty. Pods are gound into powder, then boiled in water which reduces them to dark harnup pekmez (carob molasses). Carob syrup can be found in most health food stores globally, but the local version of pekmez can only be found in local supermarkets. ​ Pekmez is used in soups and stews, spread on bread, poured over ice cream, mixed with yoghurt or trickled over pastry and fruit. Restaurants sell desserts made of pekmez, such as gullurikya. In villages such as Tatlisu and Ozankoy which hold annual Carob Festivals , a sweet fermented drink is also brewed with pekmez and drank ice cold. Locals believe that a teaspoon a day of pekmez keep colds and flu away. The fruit of this tree contain vitamins A, B, B2, B3 and D, as well as zinc, useful for both children and adults suffering from anaemia. Harnup Pekmez is also believed to show positive effects in treating impotence and infertility. Top Guides > Pilavuna Local culture embraces communal baking and often revolves around bread or pastry and Pilavuna is a cheese-filled pastry unique to Northern Cyprus. Made with a yeast pastry, comparable to bread dough, which is rolled very thinly, the pastry is similar to shortcrust in texture. They're filled with a combination of Hellim and nor, a fresh mild whey cheese produced in Cyprus, the cheeses then mixed with dried mint and sometimes sweet sultanas. Depending where they're made, recipes vary from salty to semi-sweet or sweet and often eaten with breakfast or as a snack with tea in the afternoon. Sometimes also referred to as “flaounes ”, locals serve Pilavna as a celebratory food for the breaking of the Lenten fast, being prepared on Good Friday for consumption on Easter Sunday by Orthodox Christians. Pilavuna’s were featured as a technical challenge in The Great British Bake Off television series. Top Foodie > Prickly Pear (Cactus) Prickly Pears, known locally as Babutsa , is a cactus fruit that can be seen everywhere in Northern Cyprus. It's unpretentious, requiring no special care or water. You can eat it raw, whole, or with the bones which are inside it. In this form it's good for digestion and helps cleanse the body. It's high in antioxidants, contains vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. and has a smell similar to watermelon. It can also be used to make marmalade; be added to desserts and liqueurs; baked or stewed. T he only drawback of course, is that it's covered in thorns! If you decide to clean these off yourself the first thing you'll need is patience and the second thing you'll need is gloves. Start by cutting off the edges of the fruit from the top and bottom, then cut from top to bottom, remove the skin and voila! Juicy cactus figs. But that's not all this wonderful barbed pear is good for. Ancient builders used it to built castles and fortresses would you believe. They cooked the cactus leaves to a jelly-like state, mixed this with soil and used it as cement because the composition was so strong. The famous Bellapais Abbey was built this way. You don't see any cement there and it's still standing centuries later. It also gets used for home security. How many burglars would want to climb over a prickly cactus fence like the one pictured? Top Foodie > Raki Locals call Raki, the anise-flavoured drink “Lion’s Milk” . It's not known where or when the drink was invented, but its' history is less than wine or beer. It's made from different fruits in different regions, but grapes, figs and plums are the main ones. The best way to drink raki is with flat cylindrical glasses and cold – straight (sek), with water, soda or mineral water. Usually 40% – 50% alcohol, it changes colour and becomes a milky white when water is added. A glass of pure water helps clean the palette so you can better enjoy the distinct taste. Served at every restaurant, but traditionally associated with tavernas (meyhanes ), it's usually served with meze’s, meat or fresh fish. Local custom is to clink glasses with the bottom of the glass as using the top indicates you think you're superior. Another tradition is to knock the table lightly with the bottom of your glass before you take a sip, indicating there's someone you're thinking of who you wish was there. ​ After a Raki, a local tip is to try a Turkish tea (çay) which will sober and calm you for the next round. The raki table is referred to as çilingir (“locksmith”), alluding to the way the secrets of the heart are unlocked and spoken around this table. Cheers! Shay-re-fe-nee-ze! Top Foodie > Recipes - Chicken Tavuklu Börek (Chicken pies) The cornerstone of Turkish cuisine - intricate little parcels, filled with delight. Turkish women pride themselves on the small size of these exquisite mezze, even if it requires hours of devotion to make them. Börek are always present at every celebration and the event would not have enough glitter without their enticing, bulgy presence. There are a multitude of different fillings, according to the season and the occasion. The pastry used to wrap them also varies, from the paper-thin fillo pastry found in the cities to permutations of homemade puff pastry, or a simple, homemade substitute for fillo. Fillo pastry freezes well and it will keep frozen for up to 3 months. Let it defrost for a couple of hours at room temperature before it's to be used. When bought fresh, it'll keep in the refrigerator for up to a week. Once it's unwrapped, work swiftly, as it soon dries out and becomes brittle. If not familiar with fillo, cover the bulk of it with a slightly damp tea towel while using it and take your time. Preparation time: 1 hour + 20 minutes baking at Gas Mark 4 / 180°C/350°F. Makes 25. Ingredients For filling 375 g (12 oz) cooked chicken breast fillets 25 g (1 oz) butter 25 g (1 oz) plain flour 150 ml (1/4 pint) hot milk 4 tablespoons hot chicken stock 50 g (2 oz) parmesan, or Gruyère cheese, grated 1 egg, beaten lightly A pinch each of ground nutmeg and salt To make up the Börek 8-10 sheets of fillo pastry (or milföy hamuru in Turkish) 75 g (3 oz) butter, melted oil for greasing Preparation : Preheat the oven. If you're using cooked chicken, just cut it into peanut-sized pieces. If you're using chicken fillets, first simmer them in hot water for 6-8 minutes and then take them out and chop them roughly to the same size. Melt the butter, add the flour and stir over a low heat until well mixed into a roux. withdraw the pan from the heat and add the hot milk and chicken stock gradually, stirring; return the pan to a gentle heat and whisk the sauce until it boils and thickens enough, which should take 5-6 minutes. Add the cheese and the seasonings and mix well. Away from the heat, add the beaten egg slowly, stirring, and then the chicken pieces. It should be fairly thick in order to be used successfully in the börek. Next, cut the whole stack of fillo pastry into four long strips, about 8 cm (3 inches) wide. Brush each sheet with melted butter, place a teaspoon of filling in one corner and fold them over making little triangles. Place these on an oiled baking sheet, with the loose end of the pastry underneath, brush the tops with melted butter and bake for 20 minutes or until golden crisp and light golden. Alternatively, you could use puff pastry, which is available freshly made or frozen. Defrost if needed and cut walnut-sized pieces off the pastry. Roll them out thinly in small circles of about 10 cm (4 inches) diameter, place a teaspoon of filling in the centre, fold the pastry over and press the edges together, making a semi-circular shape. Brush the tops with beaten egg, and bake as before for about 20 minutes or until light golden. Cherkes Tavugu (Circassian chicken) Preparation time: 30 minutes + 1 hour. Serves 6 as a main course, or 8 as a starter Ingredients 1.5-1.75 kg (3 and ½ -4 lb) chicken -jointed 2 carrots -peeled and quartered 1 onion -chopped 250 gr (8 oz) shelled walnuts or walnut pieces -ground finely 175 gr (6 oz) white breadcrumbs 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 40 gr (1 and ½ oz) butter 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt Preparation : Cover the chicken joints with water; add some salt, bring to boil and skim. Add the vegetables, cover and cook for 50-60 minutes, until the chicken is tender. Take out the joints, reserve the stock, and when the joints are cool, skin and bone them, shredding the meat into large mouthful morsels. Cover the meat to prevent it from drying and set it aside. Boil the stock until it's reduced to about 300 ml (½ pint) and discard the carrots. Mix the walnuts, breadcrumbs and half the cayenne in a small bowl. If you are planning to serve the dish hot, stop at this stage and prepare the rest shortly before it is to be served. Otherwise just continue. Add enough hot chicken stock to form a smooth paste and mix well. Melt the butter in a frying pan and sauté the chicken pieces in it until they start to brown. Withdraw from the heat, add 4 tablespoons of the walnut sauce and a little more salt and mix well. Pile the chicken on to a platter and use the remaining sauce to cover the whole surface smoothly. Mix the olive oil with the remaining cayenne and decorate the surface by dribbling the oil in decorative patterns. Kolokas (Colocasia with chicken) Serves 4-6 Ingredients 1 kg chicken -jointed 1 kg kolokas (colocasia) 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion -skinned and finely chopped 4 sticks of celery -cut into thick slices 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 litre chicken stock Seasoning Preparation : Put the cooking oil and the olive oil into a large saucepan and place the pan on high heat. Fry the chicken joints until golden brown on both sides. Remove the joints and keep them on one side. Add the chopped onion and fry until soft and golden brown. Meanwhile with a sharp knife peel the kolokas, without washing. Then, by holding it from the thick stalk part, starting from the top, break pieces with a sharp knife from the kolokas. Add the sliced celery and the kolokas pieces together with the chicken joints into the pan. Season well with salt and freshly ground balck pepper. Dissolve the tomato paste in the hot chicken stock and pour it over the meat and the vegetables. Bring it to the boil, then cover and cook for about 30 minutes on low heat, stirring occasionally. Top Foodie > Recipes - Desserts Aşure (Noah's Pudding) Ingredients 1 ½ glasses ground wheat 2/5 glass rice 30 glasses water 3 glasses milk 3 glasses granulated sugar 50 gr. dried beans 50 gr. dried broad beans 50 gr. chick peas 100 gr. walnuts 100 gr. dried apricots 150 gr. sultanas 100 gr. figs 25 gr. pine nuts 25 gr. currants 100 gr. almonds 1/3 glass rose water ​ Preparation : Soak wheat and rice overnight in cold water. Pour out that water and add 30 glasses fresh water, cook over heat a little less than moderate for 6-7 hours until the wheat is tender. Pour through a strainer, press with a wooden spoon in order to strain. Stir this wheat essenced water thoroughly and measure it. There should be about 12 glasses, add to this wheat essenced water, sugar and milk, place on heat and stir until the sugar melts. Boil either once or twice until the mixture becomes the consistency of quite a thick soup. Soak the beans; dried broad beans and chick peas overnight in cold water. Boil them the next day and add to the mixture along with the cleaned and washed sultanas; currants; dried apricots cut into small pieces; white pine nuts; boiled almonds after removing their skins; chopped walnuts; and rose water. Bring to the boil. Remove from heat and pour immediately into various bowls. After completely cooling, decorate with almonds, walnuts and pomegranates. Serves 4. Baklava (Syrup Filo Pastry) Baklava is one of the oldest known Turkish flaky pastry desserts. Its popularity goes back to the time of Sultan Mehmet (15th century) of the Ottoman Empire. Ingredients 500 grams of filo pastry 300 grams of unsalted butter (melted) 2 cups chopped walnuts or pistachio nuts For the Syrup 500 grams of sugar ½ litre of water Juice of ½ lemon Preparation : Preheat the owen to 180°C/350°F and grease a 25 x 30 cm baking dish. Brush dish with melted butter. Place one sheet of filo pastry in bottom of dish and brush with melted butter. Place another sheet of pastry and brush the top with melted butter. Continue this until you use half of the filo pastry. Sprinkle with chopped nuts. Place the remaining layers of filo pastry, brushing each one with melted butter. Brush the top with melted butter and cut into diamond shapes. Bake until golden. To make the syrup, place the above ingredients in a saucepan and boil on medium heat stirring constantly. Let simmer for 15 minutes. Pour hot syrup over cooled baklava. Allow to cool and absorb syrup before serving. Ceviz Macunu (Green Walnuts in Syrup) Ingredients Ceviz Macunu (Green Walnuts in Syrup)100 green walnuts - peeled 800 gr (4 cups) sugar 100 almonds -peeled 6-7 cloves Juice of 2 and a half lemons Preparation : With a small sharp knife, cut the tough bony parts on both ends of each walnut. Put them into a bucket full of water for 7 days, changing the water daily. On the eighth day put them in water with a handful of lime stone dissolved in. Drain and wash them well. Into a large saucepan put enough water to cover them. Place the pan on high heat and bring the water up to the boil. Then add the walnuts and cook for 10 minutes. Drain them well. Place the pan again with fresh water, place it on heat, bring up to the boil and cook for 15-20 minutes. Drain and with a skewer make 2-3 holes on each walnut. Cook them again in freshly boiled water for 20-25 minutes and drain. Let them cool down in cold water with the juice of two lemons added. Drain and stuff each walnut from the cut ends with an almond and place them into an empty saucepan. Pour the sugar over the fruits and wait until they release their own water. Cook the walnuts on low heat until the syrup thickens. Add the juice of ½ lemon and allow them to cool. Place them in sterilised dry jars with lid. It can be stored, in cool place, for up to one year. Gatmer (Sweet filo pastry with walnuts) Ingredients 5 Sheets of filo pastry (about 250 gr) 150 gr walnuts, roughly chopped 225 gr butter For the Syrup 350 gr sugar 500 ml water 1 tablespoon citrus blossom water Few drops of lemon juice Preparation : Oven temerature - 240°C, gas mark 9. To make the syrup in a medium size saucepan dissolve the sugar in a water and add in the lemon juice and the citrus blossom water. Place the pan on high heat and bring slowly to boil. Then reduce the heat and simmer for a few minutes until it turns into a shiny syrup. Let it cool down on one side. Grease a round baking tray. On each leaf of filo brush some melted butter. In the middle of the square pastry put some of the coarsely chopped walnuts. First, fold the two opposite sides, then roll it loosely. Place them into the baking tray in rounds, starting from the middle. Pour the rest of the melted butter over them and bake for 15-20 minutes or until slightly golden. Pour the cold syrup over the hot pastry and allow it to soak well. Decorate it with chopped pistachio nuts and serve cold. Serves 4. Irmik Kurabiyesi (Cypriot Nut-stuffed Semolina pastries) Ingredients 1/4 lb Sweet butter 1 1/4 c Fine semolina Orange flower water 1/4 ts Salt 3 tb Warm water (more if needed) 1 c Chopped unsalted pistachios 4 1/2 tb Granulated sugar 1 tb Ground cinnamon Confectioners' sugar Preparation : Oven temerature - 180°C/350°F. In a small, heavy saucepan, bring the butter to bubbling over medium heat and stir in the fine semolina. Transfer to a small bowl, cover, and let stand overnight at room temperature. The next day, uncover and add 2 teaspoons orange flower water, the salt, and gradually the warm water, working with your fingers to make a firm dough. Knead for 5 minutes, then cover and let rest 1 hour. Meanwhile, combine the pistachios, sugar, and ground cinnamon in a small bowl. Break off pieces of dough slightly larger in size than a walnut. Work in your fingers to form a ball. Press the centre with your thumb to make a large well and fill with 1 teaspoon of the nut mixture, then cover over with dough and shape into an oval. Set on a cookie sheet and continue until all pastries are shaped. Bake in a moderate oven (350°F) for 30 to 35 minutes or until the yellow colour has become a light (not a deep) chestnut. Remove to racks and cool for 10 minutes, then dip quickly into orange flower water and roll in confectioners' sugar. Cool before storing. Note: You may substitute blanched almonds for the pistachios and peanut oil for the butter. Serves 30 cookies. Lokma (Honeyed crisp doughnuts) These golden, light bubbles that are bathed with thick honey (or syrup if preferred) as they emerge from the crackling cauldron of hot oil and served immediately, dusted with aromatic cinnamon, are glittering prize of a shopping trip or a visit to the market. Made from humble ingredients of flour, yeast and water -basically, a leavened bread dough- they impress with their sumptuously pleasurable results. They are also made for Bayrams and other religious festivals and offered on large platters to visitors. Ingredients 250 gr (8 oz) plain flour ¼ teaspoon salt 6 gr easy blend dried yeast or 15 gr (½ oz) fresh yeast 270 ml (9 fl oz) warm water ½ teaspoon sugar -if fresh yeast is used 300 ml (½ pint) vegetable oil -or more if necessary 6-7 teaspoons good quality aromatic clear honey 1 teaspoon cinnamon Preparation : Time - 2 and a half hours. Sift the flour and salt in a bowl and mix the dried yeast in; add the warm water slowly while beating either with an electric mixer or a balloon whisk until all the water has been added and the mixture is smooth and lightly frothy, all in all about 2-3 minutes. Cover with a tea towel and let it rest in a warm place for one hour, until it has doubled its size and looks frothy. If using fresh yeast, dissolve the yeast in about 60 ml (2 fl oz) of warm water (about 40°C/100°F), add the sugar to activate it and let it stand in a warm place for about 15 minutes, until it starts to froth. (If the water is too hot it will kill the yeast.) Empty the dissolved yeast into the middle of the sifted flour, beating continuously. Add the remaining warm water slowly, while beating at the same time, until the mixture becomes smooth, soft and elastic. Cover with a tea towel and leave in a warm place for about 2 and a half hours until it rises and almost doubles in size. Have the oil very hot but not smoking, using a saucepan or deep-fryer, and drop teaspoon of the mixture in it, 6-8 at a time. Dip the teaspoon into a cup of cold water between each addition to prevent stickiness. The lokma puff up and rise to the surface within seconds. Turn them over and as they become pale golden all over -it only takes a minute- lift them out with a slotted spoon and drain them on absorbent paper. You will have around 30 lokmas. Serve 5-6 on each plate, dribble a teaspoon of honey all over, sprinkle on some cinnamon and serve immediately. Serves 4-6. Muhallebi (Cypriot Rice Powder Pudding) This is a much loved Turkish-Cypriot dessert prepared by families all year round. Ingredients 1 pint (568 ml) semi-skimmed milk 4 tablespoon rice powder [1 rounded tablespoon rice powder per 1 water glassful of milk] ¾ to 1 water-glassful sugar [or enough sugar to taste] 2-4 granules of mastic (mezdeki) grounded with 1 teaspoon of sugar 2-3 bitter orange leaves or orange blossoms Water optional or if available Pistachios and almonds (if desired) Preparation : In a basin or a large bowl, mix rice powder into a paste with a little milk taken from 1 pint (568 ml). Heat remaining milk to almost boiling point and pour onto the rice paste, stirring well. Return the mix to the saucepan and add orange leaves and bring to boil over gentle heat while stirring continuously. Once the mixture starts bubbling, reduce the heat and continue stirring for another 5-10 minutes more. Add sugar and keep stirring until it dissolves completely. If the mixture becomes too thick dilute with a little milk or water. Just before turning the heat off add powdered mastic, orange blossoms (or bitter-orange leaves) and stir well. Remove the leaves (if used instead of blossoms) and pour the creamy mixture into small bowls (or a one large shallow dish approximately 1-1 and ½” deep. Decorate the pudding top with pistachios and almonds if desired. Serves 5. Helpful Hints: Add sugar after the rice powder mixture has been stirred, boiled and thickened for at least 10 minutes. Add mastic right at the end. At the end, you may wish to place the saucepan in cold water and beat the mixture for a few minutes before pouring into small dishes. Shammali (Yoghurt, Almond and Semolina Cake) Ingredients 1 glass cooking oil half glass sugar 3 eggs 2 glasses semolina (fine or coarse) 1 glass self raising flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 glass milk (you might need less or a little more) about 2 tablespoons roasted split almonds optional: 1 teaspoon almond essence For the syrup 3 glasses water 2 and a half glasses sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice Preparation : Make the syrup first: bring the ingredients to the boil, simmer gently for about 20 minutes, leave to cool. Thoroughly whisk all the ingredients for the bake (less the flaked almonds) to a thick batter like consistency (like a sponge cake mixture) - add the milk gradually, stopping when the raw cake mixture is smooth enough. Place mixture in greased tin and sprinkle the almonds on the top. Bake in medium oven (200°C) for about 60 min. until the top is golden brown and the cake shrinks slightly from the sides of the tin. Pour cold syrup over hot cake, leave to cool and cut in squares for serving. Serves 6. Sütlaç (Rice Pudding) This is a delicious, light dessert enjoyed in the warmer weathers or after a rich meal of meat dishes or fried fish. Ingredients 1 litre milk 250 grams sugar 100 grams rice 1 tablespoon of rice flour 3 - 4 teaspoons of vanilla sugar Preparation : First, wash the rice in cold water. Then boil rice in water, enough to cover rice with. When rice expands, take off heat, drain rice and mix in milk. Place rice and milk on heat when mixture begins to boil add sugar and stir slightly. Simmer until rice is cooked (approximately 10 minutes). Make a paste of the rice flour with a little amount of water and stir into milk mixture and continue stirring. Allow to simmer for a little while longer. Take off heat and add vanilla sugar. Pour Sütlaç into individual bowls and let cool. Sprinkle with cinnamon serve cold. Serves 4. Turunç Macunu (Bitter Oranges in Syrup) Ingredients 20 bitter oranges 1.5 kg sugar 675 ml cold water 2 table spoons lemon juice ½ tablespoon vanilla sugar Preparation : Turunç Macunu (Bitter Oranges in Syrup)Slightly grate bitter oranges to remove the red colour which covers their skins. Without cutting the flesh itself, cut the peel off the oranges divided to four. Remove the white pith from the inside of the skin and roll them. Tie with a strong string so that they remain rolled while cooking. Then place in a glassbowl of cold water and leave for 3-4 days. Change the water daily. On the fourth day, place them into a large pan of boiling water. Cook for 20 minutes until they are soft. Drain them well. Into a separate saucepan pour 3 cups of water and 1.5 kg sugar. Place the pan on heat and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. When it starts to boil, add in the rolled skins and cook for 40 minutes until the syrup thickens. Shortly before removing the pan from the heat add lemon juice and the vanilla sugar. Let it cool and then transfer into dry jars with lid. Store in cool place for up to one year. Turkish Delight (Lokum) The best Turkish Delight is made by the Turkish masters of its art; but a delicious approximation can be made at home. Its secrets are uninterrupted stirring and careful aging. Time - Total first-day time: 3 hours. Aging: 2+ days Ingredients 4 cups sugar 1½ cups water 1 tbsp. lemon juice 1 cup cornstarch 1 tsp. cream of tartar 3 cups water 2 tbsp. rose or orange flower water, orange juice or lemon juice, or vanilla extract 1-2 tsp. vanilla or other extract or essence Several drops food coloring ½ cup almonds, skinless pistachios or walnuts, chopped and lightly toasted (optional) ½ cup powdered sugar ½ cup cornstarch Preparation : Combine sugar, 1½ cup water and lemon juice in a heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil vigorously for 5 to 10 minutes, until the syrup reaches 240°F on a food thermometer, or forms a soft ball when a bit is dropped into cold water. Turn off the heat. Using a blender, food processor, or whisk, combine the cornstarch and cream of tartar, then gradually add 3 cups of water, stirring vigorously to fully combine the ingredients and prevent lumping. Transfer this mixture to a large saucepan, and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. If any lumps form, scoop them out of the pan; don't try to break them up to make them smooth. It won't work. Once the cornstarch mixture has come to a boil, pour in the hot syrup in a thin, steady stream, stirring constantly. Reduce the heat and simmer the mixture for 1 to 2 hours, stirring constantly, until the mixture has turned a pale gold. Turn off the heat. Stir in flavouring to taste, and food colouring, if desired. Blend in the nuts, if desired. Using a flavourless oil, lightly oil a 9" square baking pan, then line the pan with lightly oiled baker's parchment. Pour the Lokum into the pan, then tilt it to distribute the mixture evenly. Wait until the Lokum has cooled completely before covering the pan with plastic wrap. Do not allow the plastic to touch the surface of the Lokum, or it will stick mercilessly. Let the Lokum rest for at least two days before cutting into 1" wide strips with an oiled kitchen knife (not serrated). Clean and oil the knife after every cut. If the Lokum is too gummy to cut, let it age longer. Lay out the strips on a lightly oiled tray and let them rest for another day or two before cutting into small squares. Combine one-half cup each of cornstarch and powdered sugar in a tightly covered container. Put 2 or 3 squares of Lokum into the container, cover and shake to coat them with the mixture. Store in an airtight container, separating the layers with parchment, waxed paper or doilies. Top Foodie > Recipes - Meat Sish Kebab Ingredients : 500 grams of diced lamb Juice of 1/2 lemon 2 tomatoes 6 long green peppers 1 onion salt, pepper Preparation : Grate onion and remove its liquid. Place diced lamb in a bowl and add onion and lemon juices. Cover and rest for a few hours. Cut peppers and tomaotes into large pieces. Place meat and alternate layers of peppers and tomatoes on skewers. Cook on hot plate or barbeque, turning frequently. Serve with a fresh garden salad. ​ Köfte (Turkish meatballs) These appetising, walnut-shaped morsels are always part of the Turkish mezze. They are best served hot, but are also quite good at room temperature and also ideal for a picnic. In Turkey or Northern Cyprus minced lamb is used, but beef or a mixture of both will do. Preparation time - 20 minutes. Serves: 4-6. Ingredients 2 medium-size slices of crustless stale bread, soaked briefly in water 500 g (1 lb) minced lamb or beef 1 medium-size onion, grated thickly 2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint, or 1 tablespoon dried mint 1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley 1 clove of garlic, crushed 1 egg - salt and black pepper For frying 75 g (3 oz) plain flour 150 ml (1/4 pint) vegetable oil Preparation : Squeeze out excess water from the soaked bread, leaving it quite dry. Combine all the ingredients for the Köfte in a bowl and mix well. Make walnut-shaped balls and keep them covered until they are to be eaten. Then roll them lightly in flour and fry in hot oil for 2-3 minutes until golden all over. They can be shallow -or deep- fried. Lahmacun (Turkish pizza) Ingredients A pack of pitas 1 lb ground beef 1 lb white onion 1 or 2 tomatoes Salt, black pepper to taste If you can't find tomatoes, you can replace it with 2 table spoons of tomatoe puree. Preparation : Peel, wash, place onions with tomatoes in a food processor and ground. Add salt, black pepper and meat, ground 30 seconds more. With the help of a spoon spread this mixture over pitas. Put them in oven and bake at 400°F about 20-30 minutes. Check to see whether meat is cooked. Serve hot. Bumbar (Cypriot sausages) Stuffed intestines with rice; serves 4-6 Ingredients 3 thin intestines (with no hole) 700 gr minced beef 1 large onion -grated 160 gr rice -washed and drained 750 ml (3/4 litre) water 2-3 tablespoons salt 3 tablespoons parsley -finely chopped 2 large ripe tomatoes -peeled and chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste 100 ml cooking oil Vinegar Lemon juice How to clean the instestines. Wash all the three pieces under cold water. To clean the inside, take one piece and hold one of the ends with one hand, then with the other hand start turning inside out. Fill the intestine with water, so that it runs out like a long sausage. The fatty outside is now in. Do all the three pieces in the same way. Wash them again with cold water than rub in some flour, so that all the thick mucuous is rubbled out of them. then wash again. Lastly, clean with lemon juice and vinegar. For the filling: Grate one large onion, chop the tomatoes and parsley. Wash and drain the rice. Add all into the minced beef, together with tomato paste, 2 tablespoons salt, and 3/4 litre of water. Mix all the ingredients well. Preparation : Turn all the intestine inside out in the same way. Then with a special funnel which has a large mouth (made for this purpose) fill the intestine with the prepared filling and tie the ends with a thick string. Put all the stuffed intestines into a large cooking pot. Fill with cold water just to cover all. Add 2 teaspoons of salt. Bring to boil and simmer 30-45 minutes. In the middle of the cooking time, make holes on each intestine with a skewer, so that all the air escapes. When cooked, take them out of the water and drain. Keep 3/4 litre of the hot cooking water separately. The rest can be used in making soups or in cooking. Then fry the bumbars (intestines) until brown all over, without damaging them. After frying, take them out and serve warm. Top Foodie > Recipes - Mezze Chakistes Crushed green olives in marinate. One of the favourite Turkish Cypriot appetizers. To make chakistes, pick some green olives early in winter, best in October. Try to select the large ones. Ingredients Large green olives Water Salt Extra virgin olive oil 1 egg Garlic cloves -crushed Lemon juice Coriander -crushed Preparation . Wash olives well and dry in the sun then split them with a flat stone or a hammer. Place them into a bucket and cover them with salted water to preserve them. Leave for six days, changing the water every day. To make sure the water has got the correct quantity of salt, put a fresh egg in it. If the egg floats, with part of it coming out of water, then it's just fine. Add the juice of three lemons and pour half a cup of olive oil on the surface. They're ready to eat after one month. Serving . Get enough quantity out of the jar and wash under cold water to remove salt. Mix some olive oil with lemon juice, crushed coriander and some crushed garlic. Pour the mixture over the green olives and serve. Cacik Yogurt, cucumber & mint dip. Preparation time: 10 minutes + chilling. Serves: 4. `Cacik' in Turkey, or `Tzatziki' in Greece, is one of the best known appetisers in either cuisine. Extremely refreshing and fragrant because of the aroma of the mint, it's served with kebabs; fried slices of courgettes and aubergines; roast chicken, lamb or with meze. Deliciously thick, creamy yogurt, made from sheep's milk accounts for the wonderful texture and flavour of the dish. Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon wine vinegar 1 clove of garlic, crushed 175 g (6 oz) natural yogurt 5 cm (2-inch) piece of cucumber, diced finely or grated coarsely 3-4 fresh mint leaves, chopped finely, or 1/2 teaspoon dried mint salt Preparation Lightly beat the oil, vinegar and garlic with a fork in a bowl; add the yogurt and beat until smooth and well amalgamated. Add the cucumber, salt and the chopped mint and mix well. Serve chilled. ​ Halloumi (Hellim) cheese Hellim cheese, or Halloumi, as it's also known, is the most unique of the Cypriot delicacies. It is full fat soft cheese made of whole goat's milk, salt and a hint of mint. You can buy packaged halloumi at a local Middle Eastern grocery. Serving suggestions: Dice into small cubes for salads or serve with biscuits, cucumber or melon. It also makes a superb side dish, as well as fried or grilled topping. ​ Grilled Halloumi Ingredients : 1 halloumi (hellim) cheese -cut into thick slices. Preparation : Sliced halloumis can be cooked under a hot oven, grill or on charcoal until it starts to melt and gets slightly brown. Or it can alternatively be fried in hot oil or butter. Serve with a slice of lemon. Halloumi & Tomato Sauce This rich tomato sauce with cubes of fried Cypriot cheese goes great with penne or other short pasta with a good chewy bite. It's slightly sweet, flavored with cinnamon and mint, and just a little spicy. Ingredients : 2 x 1/2lb packages Halloumi Olive oil, for deep frying 2 - 3 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Bay leaves 3 inches Cinnamon stick, broken into 2 or 3 pieces 2 tsp. Cumin seeds 2 large Onions, sliced 3 cloves Garlic, minced 2 Serrano cillies, minced 1/2 lb. Mushrooms, sliced 1 quart Tomatoes, coarsely chopped 1 1/2 tsp. Ground cumin seed 1 Tbsp. Oregano, dry 1 Tbsp. Mint leaves, dry 1 small can Tomato paste 1 Cup Water 1/2 - 1 tsp. Sugar Salt, to taste Black pepper, to taste Preparation : Cut halloumi into 1/2 inch cubes. Deep fry in olive oil until golden and lightly browned on edges, much as one treats Paneer. Do this in batches, so that the cubes can be kept from clumping together. Drain on paper towels and put aside. This can be done ahead of time; just refrigerate halloumi in paper towels inside a container until ready to use. Heat 2 or 3 Tbsp. of olive oil in a pot over medium heat. Add bay leaves, cinnamon, and cumin seeds; fry 30 seconds. Add onions and stir-fry with the spices. After two or three minutes add garlic and chile, and continue stir-frying a few more minutes. Add mushrooms; fry a few minutes, until they change color. Add tomatoes, stir in ground cumin, oregano, and mint. Simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add tomato paste, stir well to dissolve paste. Gently stir in fried halloumi cubes and simmer 15 more minutes, stirring occasionally and adding the water as needed for the desired consistency. Add sugar, salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Hummus HummusTurkish Humus is sharply appetising; it can be served with fresh bread or pitta bread to be dipped in, or as a sauce with fried fish or kebabs. It will enliven the table when served along with a vegetable casserole or as part of a meze. Humus can be stored in the refrigerator for 3-4 days. Don't use canned chick-peas to make Humus as they're not successful. Preparation time: Soaking overnight + 1 hour cooking + 15 minutes. Serves 4-6. Ingredients 175 g (6 oz.) chick-peas, picked clean and soaked overnight 2 cloves of garlic, chopped 2 tablespoons tahini paste (optional, but add more oil if not used) Juice of 1 and a half lemons 1 and a half teaspoons ground cumin 4 tablespoons vegetable oil 300 ml (1/2 pint) chick-pea cooking liquid Salt and black pepper 1 or 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil A little cayenne pepper or paprika Preparation : Rinse the chick-peas. Cover with plenty of water in a large pan, bring to the boil and skim until clear. Cover and cook until soft: in a pressure cooker they will take 15-20 minutes; otherwise a little over 1 hour, according to their age. Strain the chick-peas, reserving the cooking liquid. divide all the ingredients in two and place the first batch in a food processor or liquidiser; blend until grainy and of a runny consistency. If too dry, add more liquid and then adjust the seasoning and blend it in briefly. Make the second batch in the same fashion. Pour on to a flat platter, and sprinkle the oil and the cayenne pepper or paprika decoratively on top before serving. Tahin Salatasi (Tahini dip) Extremely appetising and refreshing, this can be served with hot pitta or bread to be dipped in. It's a very Cypriot dish which is also offered along with kebabs, or with mezze. Preparation time: 10 minutes. Serves: 4. Ingredients 5 tablespoons Tahini paste 150 ml (1/4 pint) warm water 1-2 cloves of garlic 6 tablespoons lemon juice 4 tablespoons vegetable oil Salt to taste 1 tablespoon chopped parsley A few black olives Preparation : Combine in a blender the tahini, water, garlic and salt and blend. Slowly add the lemon and oil, alternating them, while the blades are in motion, until the mixture looks creamy in colour and texture. Adjust the seasoning and serve in a bowl with the parsley and olives sprinkled on top. Top Foodie > Recipes - Pasta & Rice Firin Makarnasi (Baked Macaroni) Ingredients 900 gr macaroni 100 gr butter 200 gr onion -finely chopped 650 gr minced beef 900 gr riped tomatoes -peeled and finely chopped 2 tablespoons tomato paste ½ tablespoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon sugar Pinch of nutmeg (optional) Seasoning 100 gr halloumi cheese For the sauce 50 gr butter 50 gr flour 600 ml milk 3 eggs -well beaten Seasoning Oven temperature: 200C, gas mark 6 ​ Preparation : In a frying pan heat 50 gr of the butter and fry the onions for about 5 minutes until they are soft, add the minced meat, all the spices, salt and pepper and fry gently for 10 minutes stirring all the time. Then add the skinned and finely chopped (or grated) tomatoes, together with the tomato paste and sugar. Cook gently for a further 10-15 minutes. To make the sauce melt the butter in a medium saucepan and add the flour. Cook the roux gently for 2-3 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and add the milk a little at a time, beating all the time. Replace on the heat and bring to the boil, stirring constantly. Add 1 tablespoon of the hot sauce into the well beaten eggs and pour the beaten eggs into the sauce. Cook the sauce 4-5 minutes, stirring all the time without boiling. Cook the macaroni in plenty of boiling salted water, until soft but firm. Drain well. Heat the rest of the butter and pour over the macaroni. Into a well greased baking tray, put half of the cooked macaroni, sprinkle with cheese, then spread the minced meat sauce on top, into which 2 tablespoons white sauce is added and well mixed. Top it up with the rest of the macaroni, sprinkle more cheese over and cover with the white sauce. Put the rest of the cheese on the top and bake in a moderately hot oven until brown and crusty on the top. Serves 8-10. Bulgur Pilavi (Cracked wheat pilaf) The delectable taste of this Cypriot dish is quite surprising and far from bland although its ingredients may seem humble at first. It can be served with bumbar, fried fish, squid or a meat casserole. Serve fresh yogurt with it. Serves 4-6. Time: 30 minutes Ingredients 125 ml (4 fl oz) olive or groundnut oil 1 medium-size onion -sliced very finely 25 gr (1 oz) vermicelli 250 gr (8 oz) bulghur (cracked wheat) -picked clean 300 ml (½ pint) chicken (or vegetable) stock Salt and pepper Preparation : Heat the oil and saute the onion until it glistens; add the vermicelli, breaking it with your hands. Continue to saute together for 4-5 minutes until it all looks pale golden. Place the bulghur in a fine sieve, wash it briefly under running water and add it to the saucepan. Add the chicken stock and season, but do not add salt if your stock was made from a stock cube; mix well. Cover the pan and simmer very gently for 6-7 minutes at most, until the mixture is dry. Cover with tea towel, place the lid tightly on top and let it stand for 10 minutes before serving. (On uncovering the saucepan you will find its aroma is quite overpowering.) The bulgur pilavi will keep quite hot and fresh, if covered like this, for about one hour and it keeps its texture if reheated with 2-3 tablespoons of water the next day. Nohutlu Pilav (Rice Pilaff with Chick Peas) Ingredients 150 gr chick peas -soaked overnight 200 gr rice -washed and drained 60 gr butter 1/2 litre (500 ml) chicken broth Preparation : Wash and drain the rice. Put the chick peas into a large saucepan and cover them with water, add some salt, bring to the boil, then cover and simmer 1-2 hours until they are soft enough. After draining them, melt the butter in a medium size saucepan, and then add the rice and fry for a minute. Add in the cooked chick peas and mix. Pour in the hot broth, bring to the boil then cover and simmer for 20 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the grains are soft. Serve hot. Serves 4-6. Top Foodie > Recipes - Salads Çoban Salatasi (Peasant-style salad) This is one of the most popular salads in North Cyprus. Light, refreshing and easy to make, it makes a perfect lunch under an olive tree by the sea. Ingredients 375 gr (12 oz) large tomatoes -washed and dried ½ onion -sliced finely ½ green pepper -sliced thinly 10 cm (4-inch) piece of cucumber -peeled and sliced 6-8 black or green olives 125 gr (4 oz) halloumi cheese -diced A pinch of dried oregano 5 tablespoons good quality olive oil Salt ​ Preparation : Quarter the tomatoes; slice them in thin segments if too large. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and toss them gently. Serve fresh bread with it, to dip the juices in typical Cypriot fashion. Serves 4. Fasulye Piyaz (Haricot bean salad) This is one of the most common of the Turkish dishes, often served as a main dish, accompanied by mezze like Hummus, or as a side dish accompanying a main meal, in order to add variety. Preparation and cooking time: Soaking overnight + 55 minutes. Serves 4. Ingredients 175 g (6 oz) haricot or cannellini beans, picked clean For the dressing 5 tablespoons olive oil ½ a lemon 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Salt and black pepper For garnish Black olives Hard-boiled eggs, peeled, and quartered lengthways Preparation : Soak the beans overnight. Rinse them and cover with plenty of water in a pan; bring to the boil, skim and add some salt. (This will make them firm, which is desirable for this dish). Boil them for 10 minutes, cover and cook until soft, which will take 40-50 minutes according to their age and quality. If they are not to be eaten immediately, very slightly undercook them and let them stay in their liquid. They will go on cooking anyway. Drain them just before they are to be served and place in a bowl with 2-3 tablespoons of their liquid. Beat the dressing ingredients lightly, add to the beans and toss gently. Empty on to a flat platter and garnish with olives and eggs. Börülce Salatasi (Black-eyed bean salad) This Cypriot dish is excellent as a substantial salad or as a main course, but be lavish with some aromatic olive oil and fresh lemon juice for authenticity. These are touches of glorification in this otherwise humble dish, which can be served hot or at room temperature. Black-eyed beans do not need soaking and cook quickly. Ingredients 250 gr (8 oz) black-eyed beans -picked clean and washed 2 tablespoons lemon juice 375 gr (12 oz) courgettes (zucchini) Salt For the dressing At least 3 tablespoons olive oil per person 1 lemon -quartered Salt and black pepper Preparation : In a medium saucepan, cover the beans with water, boil for three minutes and drain, discarding the water. Cover with fresh water, add the 2 tablespoons lemon juice (to prevent their discolouring during cooking) and salt. Cover and simmer for 25 minutes. Cut the courgettes in 5 cm (2-inch) pieces and then quarter them lengthways. Add them to the pan and cook for 5-7 more minutes. Do not strain. Serve in individual soup plates, allowing 2-3 pieces of courgette per person with some of the cooking liquid as well; pour plenty of olive oil on top, season and offer the lemon quarters to be squeezed according to individual preferences although the more lemon juice the better! Serves 4-6. Ahtapot Salatasi (Octopus Salad) Ingredients One 300 gr octopus -cleaned, washed and cut into large pieces 1 and ½ litre water 1 tablespoon salt 100-150 gr onion -finely chopped 250 gr ripe tomatoes -peeled and cut into small pieces 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 2 spring onions -finely chopped 90 gr green cocktail olives -cut through the middle 2 tablespoons capers 4 tablespoons lemon juice ½ tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons olive oil Seasoning Preparation : Put the water and the salt into a large saucepan and place the pan on high heat. Bring up to boil and add the cut octopus. Cook for 40-50 minutes or until the octopus is soft. Drain well. Into a large salad bowl put the drained octopus, chopped tomatoes, chopped onion, chopped parsley and the green olives and mix well. To make the sauce, mix the olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a separate bowl. Pour the sauce over the salad and mix well. Serve with fresh bread and butter Top Foodie > Recipes - Seafood Raki Soslu Levrek (Fried Fish in Raki Sauce) Ingredients 1 kg fish of choice 250 ml oil flour salt lemon parsley Preparation : Clean and wash fish. Salt fish and rest for 10 minutes. Flour fish and fry in hot oil until golden brown. Remove and place on absorbent paper. Arrange fish on a serving platter. Place lemon wedges around fish and decorate with parsley. ​ Ahtapot Salatasi (Octopus Salad) ​ ​ Ingredients One 300 gr octopus -cleaned, washed and cut into large pieces 1 and ½ litre water 1 tablespoon salt 100-150 gr onion -finely chopped 250 gr ripe tomatoes -peeled and cut into small pieces 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 2 spring onions -finely chopped 90 gr green cocktail olives -cut through the middle 2 tablespoons capers 4 tablespoons lemon juice ½ tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons olive oil Seasoning Preparation : Put the water and the salt into a large saucepan and place the pan on high heat. Bring up to boil and add the cut octopus. Cook for 40-50 minutes or until the octopus is soft. Drain well. Into a large salad bowl put the drained octopus, chopped tomatoes, chopped onion, chopped parsley and the green olives and mix well. To make the sauce, mix the olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a separate bowl. Pour the sauce over the salad and mix well. Serve with fresh bread and butter. Sipya (Cuttlefish cooked with its ink) Ingredients 1 kg cuttlefish -eyes, beaks and guts removed; several ink sacks reserved for cooking 2 medium onions -finely chopped 3-4 garlic cloves -crushed 60 ml (4 tablespoons) olive oil ¼ litre dry white wine 2 large ripe tomatoes -coarsely chopped 1 tablespoon brandy ½ tablespoon starch Pinch of cayenne pepper Seasoning Preparation : Put the olive oil into a large saucepan and place the pan on high heat. When the oil is hot, fry the chopped onions until soft. Add the crushed garlic and fry few more minutes. Then add the cuttlefish and cook them 20-25 minutes on low heat. Add the wine, chopped tomatoes and pinch of cayenne pepper, cover and cook 30 more minutes. Dissolve the starch with little water in a small bowl, add the ink sacks and pour all into the saucepan together with the brandy. Season well, cover the saucepan with the lid and cook for 45 minutes or until they are very tender. Serve hot. Top Foodie > Recipes - Soups Tarhana (Crushed wheat soup) Tarhana is made locally by the villagers. It's a mixture of crushed wheat and yogurt, first cooked then in small biscuit forms dried in the sun for four to five days. These dried pieces are then placed in airtight bags to be used in cold winter days. It's also sold in the grocery shops. Serves 4-6. Ingredients 1 litre chicken / vegetable broth 200 gr diced Cypriot halloumi cheese 400 gr tarhana 30 gr butter Juice of half a lemon Seasoning ​ ​ Preparation : Soak the tarhana in cold water for about an hour. Drain well then put in a pan together with the chicken broth. Simmer gently for an hour, stirring occasionally. While the soup is cooking, put the butter in a medium size frying pan and place the pan on heat. Once the butter is hot, fry the diced halloumi pieces until golden brown on both sides. Just before serving add the fried halloumi, lemon juice and the seasoning. Mix well and serve hot. ​ Yayla Çorbasi (Soup of the Pastures) Ingrdients Yayla Çorbasi (Soup of the Pastures) 4 cups of chicken/vegetable stock 2 tablespoons rice -washed and drained 1 cup natural full-fat yogurt 1 dessertspoon flour 1 teaspoon butter 1 teaspoon dried mint leaves Preparation : Bring the salted stock and rice to the boil, then simmer until it is cooked. Remove from the heat. In a bowl, stir the flour into the yogurt and mix until smooth. Slowly whisk one cup of hot stock into the yogurt one spoonful at a time to prevent curdling. Add the yogurt mixture to the stock and rice. Stir and reheat gently until the soup has just thickened. Add salt to taste. Top the soup with a knob of butter. Sprinkle with dried mint leaves and serve. Serves 4. Hummus Soup Hummus lovers: this ones's for you! This hummus soup is warming, rich and creamy. It's super easy to make and makes the perfect quick meal.Gluten free, vegan, serves 2 people. Ingredients soup 1 can chickpeas 1/2 large onion (around 80g) 1 small carrot (around 50g) 4 medium garlic cloves 1 Tsp cumin 2 1/2 cup vegetable broth 3 Tbsp Tahini 1 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice salt and pepper​ ​ to serve Harissa paste cherry tomatoes coriander and parsley sesame seeds drizzle of olive oil Preparation : Preheat oven to 200C. Place garlic cloves on a baking tray and roast for 10-15 minutes until slightly golden and soft. Add onions to a pot and sautèe until they are slightly browned and fragrant. Add carrots, chickpeas and cumin too and cook for a few more minutes. Peel the roasted garlic cloves, chop off the hard ends and stir into the onion-carrotchickpea mixture. Add the vegetable broth and let simmer for about 10 minutes until the carrots are soft. Mix in the Tahini and lemon juice and blend either in a high speed blender or with an immersion blender to reach a silky smooth consistency. Season with salt and pepper, blend again and divide between two bowls. Garnish with toppings and serve with your favourite bread. You can make a bigger batch of course by adjusting the ingredients to your desired amount. Top Foodie > Recipes - Vegetarian Yalanci Dolma (Stuffed Vine Leaves) Ingredients 25 vine leaves one and a half cups of onions, finely chopped one cup of spring onions, finely chopped 1 cup of olive oil 1 cup of rice Salt and pepper Juice of 2 lemons Half a cup of dill, finely chopped quarter cup of fresh mint, finely chopped Prepraration : Blanch the vine leaves, drain and allow to cool. Mix all the ingredients except the lemons and wrap in the vine leaves, forming them into roll shapes. Place some of the vine leaves on the bottom of the pan, then place the rolls in outward radiating circles, evenly spaced and close to one another. Gently place a plate that's not too heavy on top of the vine leaves so that they don't break open during cooking Add the lemon juice and enough water to cover the rolls. Boil gently until the water had been absorbed and rice cooked. Allow to cool then arrange on a plate, garnished with slices of lemon. Serves 4-5. ​ Çiçek Dolmasi (Stuffed Marrow Flowers) Ingredients 1 bunch marrow flowers with stems and pistils removed. 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 75-100 ml water For the stuffing 150 gr rice -washed and drained 1 small onion -finely chopped 2 medium tomatoes -peeled and finely chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil Seasoning 10-15 leaves of fresh mint -washed and roughly chopped Prepraration : ; Wash and dry them the flowers by gently pressing onto a towel. Mix the stuffing ingredients together except the cooking oil and stuff the flowers carefully by using a small teaspoon. When doing this take care not to tear the flowers, and also fill only 3/4 so that when cooking the rice has enough space to expand. After stuffing, fold the flower petals in without breaking them. Into a small saucepan, put one tablespoon of cooking oil and place the pan on low heat. Place each flower into the saucepan by standing them next to each other. Pour 100 ml of water into the pan and bring gently to boil. Cover the saucepan and cook gently on low heat another 20 minutes until all the water has absorbed and the rice is cooked. Serve hot or cold. Serves 4. Domates Dolmasi (Stuffed Tomatoes) Ingredients 650 gr minced beef 8 large tomatoes -cut around stems and open the seeds and wash them well 2 medium onions -finely chopped 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 750 gr ripe tomatoes -skinned and chopped or tinned tomatoes with their juice 2 eggs 3 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon dried rosemary 1/8 litre dry white wine 2 tablespoons freshly chopped basil seasoning Prepraration : Stuffed Tomatoes and Green PeppersHeat the oil in a frying pan and fry the chopped onions until soft. Put the minced meat into a large salad bowl. Add the fried onions with the oil, crushed garlic, two eggs, rosemary, salt and freshly ground black pepper and mix well. Stuff the tomatoes with the meat filling and put the lids on. Arrange them side by side with the caps upwards. Pour in the white wine and add the chopped tomatoes with their juice. Cover and cook 30-40 minutes. Add the freshly chopped basil and serve hot. Serves 4. Imam Bayildi (The Imam Fainted) There are many stories about the origin of the name of this dish. Here is one of them... A long time ago a Turkish Imam (Muslim cleric), known for his love of good food, surprised his friends by announcing his engagement to the young daughter of a wealthy olive-oil merchant. The friends did not know about her ability to cook. But they presumed part of her dowry would include olive-oil. They were right. For her father gave the groom twelve jars, each one large enough to hold a person, of the precious oil. After her marriage the bride proved to be an excellent cook and each day prepared a special dish for her epicurean husband. One of them, eggplant cooked in olive-oil, became his favorite. And he ordered that his wife prepare it each night for dinner. This she did for twelve consecutive days. On the thirteenth, however, the dish was missing from the meal. Queried about its absence, the bride replied, "Dear husband, I do not have any more olive-oil. You will have to purchase some more for me." The lmam was so shocked that he fainted. And since that day, according to the story, his favorite dish has been known as "Imam Bayildi" (the Imam Fainted). Ingredients 2 medium aubergines (eggplants) 2 medium onions, chopped Olive oil 2 garlic cloves, crushed 3 medium tomatoes, peeled and chopped 3 tablespoons chopped parsley Salt and pepper to taste 2 teaspoons sugar 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Prepraration : Sauté the onions in a little oil. Add the garlic, tomatoes, parsley, salt, and pep per. Cook until mushy. Cut the stem ends from each aubergine. Make 3 lengthwise slits, almost from end to end. With and hold each slit apart and spoon the onion mixture into each cavity. Arrange aubergines in a baking dish. Sprinkle with sugar, lemon juice, and 1/2 cup oil. Bake, covered, in preheated moderate oven (350°F) for 40 minutes, or until tender. Serve hot. or as they do in Türkiye, cold with yogurt. Serves 4-6 One modification: Instead of making three slits in the aubergine, etc., hollow the aubergines out, but leave a firm outer edge . Take the insides of the aubergines, chop them up, toss them into the pan with the other sautéed ingredients. Sauté the new mixture. Then stuff the aubergines with that mixture. If you want to microwave, I found that 15 to 20 minutes on medium works well . Actually, I microwave for 15 minutes then I baste the eggplants with the liquid at the bottom of the dish. I then cook for the remaining 5 minutes at high. You can tell by looking when the outer edge is done. We slice it for serving. Menemen (Scrambled eggs with vegetables) Ingredients 8 eggs -well beaten 2 green peppers -seeded and cut into thin rings 3 small or medium tomatoes -skinned and chopped Salt and freshly ground black pepper 30 gr (2 tablespoons) butter Prepraration : Melt the butter in a large pan. Add the pepper rings and cook them a few minutes. Then add the chopped tomatoes and cook until the juice is reduced to half. Mix in the well beaten eggs and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook the eggs stirring constantly. Serves 4. Serve at once. Molohiya Ingredients 1 kg chicken, jointed or 1 kg lamb breast, cut into pieces 160 g molohiya -soaked overnight in cold water 150 g (2 medium) onions -skinned and chopped 4 garlic cloves -thickly sliced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 large ripe tomatoes -skinned and chopped 3 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 tablespoon olive oil Juice of a lemon Seasoning 900 ml chicken stock Prepraration : Heat the oil in a large saucepan and fry the chicken pieces for about 15 minutes until golden brown on both sides. Remove the chicken joints and keep them on one side. Add the chopped onion and the sliced garlic and fry until soft. Return the chicken joints to the pan. Add the chopped tomatoes, tomato paste and the hot chicken stock. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper, add pinch of sugar and stir gently for a minute. After washing few times with cold water, drain the Molohiya well and add it to the pan. After adding juice of a lemon, stir well and bring to boil. Then cover the pan with the lid and simmer 1-2 hours, until the vegetables are well cooked. Serves 4. Top Restaurants > Restaurants Top Foodie > Recipes - Seftali Kebab Seftali (shef-ta-lee)is a type of crépinette, a sausage without skin, that uses caul fat, or omentum, the membrane that surrounds the stomach of a lamb, to wrap the ingredients together. The filling is made from lamb shoulder or leg, mixed with finely chopped onion and parsley, seasoned with salt and pepper. Rolled into small balls, the filling is wrapped in the caul fat then placed on skewers and grilled or charcoaled until golden brown. By the time it's cooked and served, the outer layer of fat is melted away and reduced to a thin golden-brown layer. It's often served in pitta bread with salad, and sometimes topped with Cacik, a Turkish appetiser or sauce made from yogurt, cucumber, olive oil and mint. ​ For those curious about the name, there are two theories as to how it came about. The Turkish word şeftali, means peach , a reference to its texture or pinky complexion when cooked. Another popular urban explanation is that a local street vendor called Ali invented the recipe, foreigners who tasted this delight quickly dubbed him “Şef Ali” (Chef Ali) and his sausage became known as Şef Ali Kebab, later shortened to “Şeftali Kebab”. One of the most popular kebab dishes, Seftali should definitely be on your must-taste list of traditional Cypriot dishes. Top Foodie > Recipes - Sunday Lunch Fancy a Sunday Roast? A Sunday Roast is a traditional British meal usually served on Sunday, although it can be served any day. The centrepiece of the meal is roasted meat along with roast potatoes, yorkshire pudding, stuffing, gravy, and condiments such as apple sauce for pork, mint sauce for lamb, or redcurrant jelly for turkey. A wide range of vegetables can be served as part of a roast dinner, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, parsnips, or peas, which can be boiled, steamed, or roasted alongside the meat and potatoes. Mashed potatoes are also a frequent accompaniment. The Sunday Roast is ranked 2nd in a list of things people love about Britain. It’s often compared to a slightly less grand version of a Christmas dinner . The tradition of a Sunday roast lunch or dinner has been a major influence on food cultures in the English-speaking world including Northern Cyprus. Here, Sunday roast normally comprises roast beef, lamb or chicken, roast potatoes, mashed potatoes, yorkshire pudding, cauliflower-broccoli cheese, creamed spinach, green beans, carrots, peas, fresh corn, beetroot, or sweet potato. There’s literally dozens and dozens of places you can get Sunday Roast in Northern Cyprus – too many to mention. And they taste great! Origin The Sunday Roast originated in the UK as a meal to be eaten after church on Sunday. All types of meat and dairy produce are allowed to be eaten on Sundays, unlike Fridays where many Roman Catholics and Anglicans traditionally don’t eat meats, so eat fish instead. It’s traditional for Anglicans and English Catholics to fast before Sunday church service, so the Sunday Roast breaks the fast afterwards. These religious rules created several traditional dishes in the United Kingdom. For example, only eating fish on Friday resulted in a British tradition of 'fish Fridays' which is still common in fish and chip shops and restaurants today, particularly during Lent. To mark the end of not being able to eat meat, the Sunday roast was created as a mark of celebration. ​ History There are 2 historical views on the origins of the Sunday Roast. In the late 1700s, during the industrial revolution in the United Kingdom, families would place a cut of meat into the oven as they got ready for church. They would add vegetables such as potatoes, turnips and parsnips before going to church on Sunday morning. When they returned from church, the dinner was all but ready. The juices from the meat and vegetables were used to make stock or gravy to pour on top of the dinner. Another opinion holds that the Sunday roast dates back to medieval times, when village serfs served the squire for six days a week. Then, on Sunday, after morning church service, they would assemble in a field to practise battle techniques, and were rewarded with spit roasted oxen. ​ Typical elements Meat Roast lamb, roast potatoes, carrots, green beans and yorkshire pudding. Roast beef, roast potatoes, various vegetables and yorkshire pudding. Typical meats - chicken, lamb, pork, or roast beef, although seasonally duck, goose, gammon, turkey, or other game birds may be used. Vegetables Sunday roasts can be served with a range of boiled, steamed or roasted vegetables. The vegetables served vary seasonally and regionally, but will usually include roast potatoes, roasted in meat dripping or vegetable oil, and gravy made from juices released by the roasting meat, perhaps supplemented by one or more stock cubes, gravy browning/thickening, roux or corn flour. The potatoes can be cooked around the meat itself, absorbing the juices and fat, but many cooks prefer to cook the potatoes and the Yorkshire pudding in a hotter oven than that used for the joint, and so remove the meat beforehand to rest and settle in a warm place. Other vegetable dishes served with roast dinner can include mashed swede or turnips, roast parsnips, boiled or steamed cabbage, broccoli, green beans, boiled carrots and peas. It’s not uncommon for leftover composite vegetable dishes such as cauliflower cheese and stewed red cabbage, to be served alongside the more usual assortment of plainly-cooked seasonal vegetables. ​ Accompaniments Beef: Yorkshire pudding, suet pudding, English mustard, horseradish sauce. roast potatoes, vegetables Pork: crackling, sage-and-onion stuffing, apple sauce or English mustard. Lamb: mint sauce or jelly or redcurrant jelly. Chicken: pigs in blankets, sausages or sausage meat, stuffing, bread sauce, apple sauce, cranberry sauce or redcurrant jelly. ​ Leftovers Leftover food from the Sunday roast has traditionally formed the basis of meals served on other days of the week. For example, meats might be used for sandwiches. Roast beef can be chopped up with leftover roasted potatoes and additional onion, then fried in a pan with oil and seasonings crispy to make roast beef hash. Lamb can be used as filling for a shepherd's pie, and vegetables can form the basis for bubble and squeak or in Scotland, traditional stovies. Top Foodie > Vineyard Hotel Top Foodie > Wineries Vines have been grown and grapes pressed in Cyprus since the Bronze Age. The first commercial wine project in Northern Cyprus was established in 2000 in Geçitköy, west of Lapta, with the aid of an international wine consultant. A variety of wines are today produced by wineries from grapes grown in the vineyards at Geçitköy, Güzelyurt as well as in Ilgaz, set high on the hills of the Five Finger Mountains. Local farmers also produce wines. Bud breaks occur in early spring with harvest around the beginning of August. Grape vines including Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Chardonnay and Semillon, the reds including Merlot, Mourvèdre, Cinsault, Grenache and the whites Chardonnay, Semillon and Chenin Blanc. Visitors are provided with a complete insight and experience of the Cypriot wine culture, from planting to the final production and can choose from a wide selection of tours, wine education courses, lectures and more to enhance the whole wine culture experience. Wine tasting events are held throughout the year. ​ Vineyard & Wine Tasting Tour A full day, including tour of a vineyard, wine tasting and lunch in avillage up in the mountains. You‘ll see amazing views, hidden places and experience a tour of the islands newest winery followed by lunch and, of course, a glass of wine. Artisan vintners will provide you with a complete insight and experience of wines grown in the mountain vineyard. You’ll have the opportunity to discover 6 (yeh!) unique and distinguished wines, as well as a tour of the complete wine making process. ​ ​ INCLUDES ​Pick up and drop off at hotel Mini mountain jeep tour Tour of vineyard Wine tasting of 6 unique wines Lunch in a local restaurant in the beautiful village of Ilgaz AVAILABLE Every Day ​DURATION 0930-1530 Top Foodie > Recipes - Zinavia A pomace brandy produced from distillation of grape pomace plus local dry wines, Zinavia is colourless with a light aroma of raisins. With an alcohol content of 40 – 95% , it's no surprise Northern Cyprus's national drink is known as ‘firewater ’. Dating to Venetian times in the 14th century it's still made in the same tradition today. Grape pomace (pulp, peel, stalks and seeds) is mixed with high-quality dry wines made from indigenous grape, distilled in a 'kazan ' copper pot and mellowed. Using different processes to produce distinct qualities and intensities, a very slow process usually lasting eight hours, turns tons of pomace into a highly potent clear liquid. ​ Locals drink Zinavia as an aperitif , serve it ice cold in summer, gulp it on cold mornings or enjoy a small measure with meals. ​ Traditionally, it was also used to treat and sterilise wounds, soothe muscular aches, numb toothaches and clean and disinfect. Villagers still make it at home and it can be seriously strong, so you can buy it from a supermarket or head to the villages for that extra kick. Zivania has varieties with up to 95% alcohol presence, so beware. Turkish Cypriots say, “the best Zinavia is the one that burns well when you set it on fire”. You may want to seek advice on alcohol levels before trying Zinavia - or afterwards if you drink too much! Top

  • Sightseeing | North Cyprus WhatsoninTRNC

    Sightseeing > A View from above Bandabulya Büyükkonuk Dervis Pasha Mansion George VI Monument Iskele Museum Kyrenia Castle & Harbour Martinengo Bastion Nicosia Venetian Walls Railway History Seyyed Efendi Cistern The Royal Tombs Salamis Vouni Palace Acendu Fountain Bedesten Cafer Pasha Hamam Enkomi Village Greco-Roman Tombs Kantara Castle Kyrenia Gate Mevlevi Tekki Museum Othello's Tower Rivettina Bastion Soli Ruins Varosha Ghost Town Arsenal Bastion Buffavento Castle Cengiz Topel Monument Gambler's Inn Güzelyurt Museum Karaoğlanoğlu Memorial Lapidary Museum Minia Cyprus Museum Petra tou Limnidi Round Tower St Hilarion Castle Venetian Column Baldoken Graveyard Büyük Hamam Chain Tower Geçitköy Dam Hz. Omer Tomb Karmi Village Lefke Aqueduct Namik Kemal Dungeon Porta Del Mare Gate Salamis Ruins The Great Inn Venetian Palace Guides > Sightseeing > A view from above Top Sightseeing > Acendu Fountain The Acendu Fountain is in Lefke, in an area which it takes its name from. At the foot of the Troodos mountains, Lefke was served by aqueducts and springs to provide its water supply and this fountain was one of them. It was thought to have been built during the 15th or 16th centuries by the Venetians between the Lefke River and Laguna Mountain skirts. ​ Prior to being built, there wasn't a water supply to the town. The Venetian ruler was named Cento, so the water became known as Aqua de Cento and over time was truncated to Cento. Today, it still provides water for orange groves surrounding it. Top Sightseeing > Arsenal Bastion Historically part of the Famagusta Walls, this bastion has been renamed and now houses a tomb and museum open to the public. When the Ottomans decided to conquer Cyprus, Canbulat Bey of Kilis, a provincial governor of the Empire, joined the invading forces. Successful during the capture of Nicosia, he was promoted to become commander of the right wing of the Ottoman army to the south of Famagusta, along with Iskender Pasha and Deniz Pasha. From here, the Ottomans bombarded the town, which is why most damage to the taller buildings within the old city walls is on the southeast side. The Ottomans initially tried to dig under the overwhelming walls, but the Venetians blasted the tunnels, and collapsed them. They then placed sharp blades on a turning wheel at the entrance of the bastion to cut any enemy into pieces. The siege lasted for months and popular folklore recounts that to obstruct the bladed turning wheel and allow the Ottomans passage through the city entrance, Canbulat decided to ride his horse into it. ​ His head was cut off , but undeterred he picked his head up, mounted his horse, and continued to fight for several days with his skull under his arm. This motivated the Ottoman soldiers to continue the onslaught and eventually led the Venetians to surrender and the Arsenal Bastion was renamed the Canbulat Bastion. Canbulat's entombed remains are located at the Bastion which is also a place of pilgrimage for modern-day Turks visiting North Cyprus. Legend also maintains that a fig tree grew up over the tomb, the fruits of which promoted fertility in women who visited. The bastion also houses the ethnographic and archaeological Canbulat Museum, displaying artillery, uniforms, antiques and Venetian pottery. After the destruction of the Arsenal Bastion , the city rapidly began work to rebuild the parapets. Traces of the repairs of the Arsenal and Ravelin Bastions as well as the walls between the two can easily be seen by visitors. The Famagusta Lighthouse also stands on this historic location. Top Sightseeing > Baldoken Graveyard At the top of Kyrenia, lies Baldöken Graveyard , also known as the Islam Graveyard or Graveyard of Forlorn. When the Ottomans conquered Cyprus in 1571, this area outside Kyrenia Castle was reserved as a cemetery for soldiers until the end of the 17th century. When it began to accept non-soldiers, the name was changed to Islam Graveyard. In the 19th century, it was also used to bury the homeless and destitute. It once covered a large area but today only the remains of a small part exist. It's still an intriguing place to visit with its' cisterns, water canals and architectural tombs. Located next to the Anglican St Andrew’s Church , it was restored in 1995. A ‘Turbe ’ (mausoleum) of the Garrison Commander of the Ottomans is located in the graveyard that has adopted its present name. Top Sightseeing > Bandabulya The yard of St Sophia (Selimiye) and St Nicolas church (Bedesten) in Nicosia was used as the main trading place in the city during Venetian rule (1489-1570) in Cyprus. People entered the walled city to sell their products and textiles, using the area for their weekly local market. Due to population growth and rising popularity, the market became a permanent fixture and people from all around Cyprus came to buyand sell sell goods at the Bandabulya market. Also known as the Municipal Bazaar , it's the first indoor vegetable market, dating back to Lusignan times as an open market area with shops and stalls for trade, and rooms to accommodate traders. The bazaar, which was completely open when it was first built, was established in 1932, and quickly became the most crowded and significant market in the city. It’s an historical place where food, beverages, spices, vegetables and fruits unique to Cyprus are sold. It was also a public space where locals could gather and take their kids for ice cream on the weekends. In addition, there are cafes, restaurants, clubs and shops used as entertainment. Bandabulya covers an area of 4500 square meters, contains 77 shops and is one of the popular bazaars of the region. ​ Etymological origin and tradition Bandabuliya is a word of Greek origin. "Banda" means continuous and "buliya" means sale. It’s the name given to the municipal markets brought to local culture by the British. It means gathering place, meeting place, shopping place, socializing place among the people. In bandabuliyas, which serve every day except Sundays, traders pay rent to the municipality they’re affiliated with. In the past, producers preferred to sell their wares in bandabuliya because sales there were in cash, whereas credit was common for sales in village squares. Bandabuliyas are found in Famagusta, Güzelyurt, Kyrenia, Lefke, Nicosia and Iskele. Some are market places, while others are used for different purposes. ​ History Nicosia has been the capital of Cyprus for about 800 years. Austrian Archduke Ludwig Salvator, who visited Cyprus in 1872, writes in his book "Levkosia" that he found 23 bazaars performing different professions between the gates of Famagusta and Paphos, and describes the "Meat and Fish Bazaar" where all kinds of food are sold in the place of current Bandabuliya. Esme Scot Stevenson , in her 1880 book "Our Home in Cyprus ", describes the Nicosia bazaar as follows: "A little further, when we turned right, passing the coppersmiths and bell makers, which were ringing in the ears, we found ourselves in the vegetable market full of large melons, watermelons, pumpkins, strings of onions, figs and grapes. One street away, in the butchers' street, we found ourselves in the vegetable market. and other kinds of meat… Beyond a narrow street, there is the Women's Bazaar. The white-veiled women were sitting cross-legged next to the piles of local fabrics in front of them." On the Kitchener map published in 1881, where the current Bandabuliya area is located, the name "Market Place" is mentioned and it's open. Again, on land registry maps of Nicosia Surlariçi (1912-1915), there is a record of "Municipial Market" in the same place. In a 1950 watercolor painting by British painter Arthur J. Legge (1859-1942), you can see greengrocers in the Nicosia bazaar selling in covered places, and the streets where the people walk are open. ​ Foundation of Bandabuliya In 1929 the city council decided to demolish the old bazaar and build a new Bandabuliya in its place. It was planned that 12 of the 132 small shops to be built would be used as fish shops, 80 as vegetable shops, 40 as wholesale warehouses, fruit shops, butcher's and pig shops. The £20,000 required for the construction was borrowed from the Bank of Cyprus at 6% interest for 30 years and shopkeepers temporarily moved to Misirli Han. The inscription "Belediye Pazarı" ("ΔHMOTΙKH AΓOPA"), in Turkish and Greek, was hung on the entrance door to the northwest of the bazaar, which was completed in 1932. ​ Extension and restoration work of Bandabuliya When Bandabuliya couldn’t keep up with demand in 1940, an adjoining garden and property were purchased and the building was expanded and completed on 14 September 1940. In 2004, restoration turned the wholesale market into an entertainment centre, while the retailers area was retained. In the early 1970s new residential areas started to be built outside the city, and gradually the market started to be neglected by locals. Over the years, the shops closed down, the building became unsafe and finally closed in 2010. With the support of the United Nations Development Program, it was renovated and re-opened in June 2012 with 77 stalls for sellers, a café, bookshops and a small theatre for performances. Top Sightseeing > Bedesten Bedesten is a historical building in the Selimiye quarter of North Nicosia, located beside the Selimiye Mosque. The structure’s history spans more than 1,000 years. Originally built as a church, expanded and rebuilt, it was converted to a Bedesten, a type of covered market, during the period of Ottoman rule and is currently used as a cultural centre. ​ Byzantine period The earliest history of the Bedesten is documented archaeologically by a Byzantine Basilica, fragments of which are preserved inside the current building. These remains possibly date to the 6th century, and marked the site of the first cathedral of Saint Sophia in Nicosia. ​ Lusignan period After the fall of Acre in the late 12th century, English monks who were followers of Thomas Becket established a new Latin church on this site and dedicated it to Saint Nicholas. With the adjacent cathedral dedicated to the Latin rite (catholic), the Bedesten probably continued to serve an Orthodox role. The church was expanded several times and rebuilt during the 14th and 15th centuries, but the old Byzantine apse was retained. ​ Venetian period During Venetian rule, the Bedesten was used as the metropolitan bishopric building by the Orthodox church and dedicated to Mary as Panagia Hodegetria. It was under the Venetians that the north façade was constructed. Patrons were noble Cypriot families, their identity documented in part by coats of arms carved above the main entrance. In the same period, the dome and large central apse were constructed, replacing the original of the Byzantine period. ​ Ottoman period In 1573, the building was given by the Ottomans to Haramayn (Mecca and Medina) to be used as a bedesten (a covered textile market). It was later used as a market for food, and by the 1760s it was a food trading centre for Turkish, Greek and Armenian merchants. By 1873, it had been converted into a flour depot. It was then used as a wheat depot in the 1870s and a generic storage place for the Evkaf Administration in the 1930s. ​ British period In the 1880s, Lord Kitchener and other prominent British men in Cyprus wanted to buy or rent the building to convert it back to a church, and use it as the Church of St Nicholas again. This wasn’t allowed as the property of a foundation couldn’t be sold, and a shrine of another religion couldn’t be opened within 100 yards of a mosque. The British undertook renovation of the building, but it didn’t reflect some of the original architecture. With the opening of the new municipal market, Bandabulya, in 1932, it fell into disuse. In the 1930s, it was used for storage by the Evkaf Administration and in 1935, the Department of Antiquities brought medieval tombstones to it from the Ömerge Mosque, and were displayed for some time in a room along with the room's ornate Ottoman-era ceiling. ​ Architecture The Bedesten of Nicosia is stylistically very different from other bedestens in the Ottoman Empire. It consists mainly of a mix of Byzantine and Gothic architecture, but also incorporates elements of Renaissance French, Venetian and probably Spanish architectural styles. It uses a cross-shaped structural style and layout that belongs to the Byzantine style, but incorporates a nave with a high ceiling that belongs to the Gothic style. The southern double nave is a remnant of the Byzantine church and its middle section is the oldest part of the building. The exterior of the nave in the north has the most ornate decorations and stonework in the building. This façade is across the front arches of the Selimiye Mosque and is the side where the entrance is located. The entrance is through a very ornate Gothic-style gate, with elements of the Italian Renaissance architecture added later and a statuette of St Nicholas. Coats of arms are located on both sides of the entrance. This façade also has numerous animal statuettes and gargoyles. ​ Renovation and current use Between June 2004 and 2009, renovation was undertaken and the walls of the building were cleansed and the vaults strengthened using traditional building materials and techniques. It was then reopened as a cultural centre. In 2009, the renovation was awarded the Europa Nostra Award. Among the activities hosted are weekly sufi dance shows and the Nicosia Walled City Jazz Festival. Top Sightseeing > Buffavento Castle At 3,100 feet, this is the highest and most inaccessible of the three famous castles in the Five Finger mountains. To get there, head out of Kyrenia towards the East and continue in the direction of Famagusta. Go through Catalkoy past the turn-off for Arapkoy and at the brow of the hill, at the Besparmak pass, turn right just after the Buffavento Restauant on the left. This leads you onto a narrow, single-track road along the southern slopes of the mountain. Drive slowly and carefully along this road and for sure don't do it if it's raining. There are a few passing places, steep drops and magnificent views over the Mesaoria Plain, Lefkosa and goats.The route twists and turns so the castle will disappear and reappear several times, but after about 4 slow miles, you’ll eventually arrive at the car park, with its’ solitary olive tree and a memorial to the crew of an aircraft that perished in a mountain top crash in 1988. Be aware that there's no toilets or facilities of any sort up here, so take a leak before you set off and bring some water with you, especially in hot weather. Now start the 30 minutes or so zig-zag path to get to just the first level of the castle. There are gently graded concrete steps with low walls for you to rest from the climb and wonderful views in every direction. Be aware that the steps don't have any hand rails. If you visit in Spring, your walk is covered in flowers that grow on the hillside. The trek up to the very top is pretty strenuous and in total may take up to an hour for the average person but it is worth it as the views over the sea to the North and the Masaoria Plain to the South are simply spectacular. ​ Inside The castle is built on two levels or wards, and the main gate at the first level is more or less intact. The lower level has the most complete rooms, possibly royal apartments, where there’s evidence of cisterns beneath the floors with some still containing water. Winter rains were the only supply of water for drinking and cooking and it was stored in deep underground reservoirs were it stayed fresh for many years. Climb the steps built into the rock face for another 75 feet to get to the upper level and the final few steps lead you into a completely waterproof barrel-vaulted room. From this there’s a passage with ruined rooms on both sides and a splendid view at the far end. If you return to the entrance, you can climb to where the lightning conductor marks the highest point. Looking down to the south west you’ll see the huge flag of the TRNC that’s painted on the hillside. Just to stand at 3,100ft and feel the wind blowing off the sea; to watch mares-tail clouds drifting across the sky; to turn 360 degrees and gaze at the spectacular panorama; and maybe hear the call of buzzards and ravens in flight as they circle the castle top, will make the climb completely rewarding. ​ History Originally built in the 11th century and rebuilt by the Lusignans in the 14th century, Buffavento is thought to have been built with St Hilarion castle as part of a major programme of works after the Seljuk advance, although it was also used as a prison and lookout post, and it’s easy to see why. The name may have been borrowed from a monastery in the Koutzoventi village. It was certainly visited by Richard the Lionheart in 1191, and one theory suggests it was built as a countermeasure for the spread of Crusader states. In medieval chronicles it was called the “Castle of the Lion ” and a Lusignan period legend claims that the castle was built by a Cypriot noblewoman who was seeking shelter from the Knights Templar and that’s why the castle was known as Leonne (Lion's Castle) or Queen's Castle. The castle saw next to no fighting. In 1191, it was surrendered to Richard the Lionheart after Kantara and St Hilarion fell. Richard sold the island to the Knights Templar then resold it to Guy of Lusignan, of the House of Lusignan. The Lusignans continued their reign interrupted only by occasional palace coups and was used as a prison. In 1308, a knight named Anseau of Brie was imprisoned at the castle when he heard of the accusations levelled against the Knights Templar in their trial. In the 14th century, the island came under the control of the Republic of Venice, at which time it fell into disuse. Architecture Buffavento has approximately 600 steps leading up to it and steep crags surrounding it, making it inaccessible from west, east and north. Many of the castle's buildings are irregular in shape, as the limited available space forced its builders to economize space. The main building material was dressed limestone from the island's coasts and stones taken directly from the mountain on which it stands. The architecture carries no signs of decoration. The upper level faces the sea (north) and the lower one the plain (south). The levels were connected by a long staircase, which was later destroyed by the Venetians who deemed the fortifications redundant. Outbuildings consist of a water cistern and a stable, which would have been useless in the event of a siege. The castle's gates were located inside a 2-storey rectangular tower with a Frankish style pointed arch. 3-barrel vaulted buildings and recess are again Frankish in origin. The main stairway leads to a 2-storey, unvaulted Byzantine building, which is divided into 3 large chambers, interconnected with water pipes. The eastern side was guarded by a short, Frankish, groin vaulted tower with a cistern and a building that may have served as a church. At the extreme west of the castle stands a ruined, isolated tower. The lack of a kitchen or a food storage, points to the fact that rooms were multi-functional in their nature. Top Sightseeing > Büyük Hamam From olden days, Hamam’s have played a definitive role in the structure of cultures, a meeting place for social gatherings, body and soul purification and general relaxation. The first buildings that Ottoman Turks built in any city were the baths, a prime facility used in the everyday life of its inhabitants, also serving as a practical sanitary service for the many that didn't have the same comfort in their homes. Buyuk Hamam is the oldest Turkish bathhouse in the city, in the Iplik Bazaar quarter, erected on the Lusignan site of the 14th century St George de Poulains Church. The only real identifiable element that remains from the former Latin church is the main entrance, which also bears similarities to the porch of the Bedesten. As the new city was built on the ruins of the former, with the rise of the ground of surrounding areas over time, the Hamam’s door is now about 2 metres below ground level with the bathrooms further below. Buyuk Hamam is one of the most stunning remains of the Ottoman period in Nicosia. The building was rebuilt as a Turkish bath between 1571 and 1590 during the first years of Ottoman rule, and belonged to the Pious Foundation of Lala Mustafa Pasha, generating a healthy income to this institution. The venue was a popular public centre, where women especially would meet to socialise and exchange gossip. It was renovated in 2008 all while the original qualities of the bathhouse were maintained, and today consists of three sections: ‘Soyunmalik’ which is the changing room, ‘Iliklik’ where visitors warm up or warm down and the ‘Sicaklik’ being the main hot feature, exhibiting a large cupola (dome) with glass-covered holes inviting sunlight over the central massage podium. The changing room also bears the original remnants of the Latin church, especially that of the large windowsills. The Buyuk Hamam is the only original Turkish bath still active in North Cyprus and an important attraction for tourists, who use it to experience hundreds of years of traditional methods of peeling and massage with aromatic oils and foam. The baths are generally open daily, and arrangements can usually be made for sex segregated and/or family sessions. Top Sightseeing > Büyükkonuk Village Formerly called Komi Kebir, Büyükkonuk nestles on the foothills of the Five Finger Mountain Range and is the gateway to Karpaz. The geography here is a combination of hilly terrain and fertile flat lands, close to seashores north and south, as here Northern Cyprus narrows to less than 10 miles. The northern coast is rocky with pebbled beaches, while the southern shoreline boasts some of the best sandy beaches in the Mediterranean. This part of Northern Cyprus is famous for its natural and man-made landscapes, the biodiversity of the plants and wildlife and its rich cultural heritage. Traditional crops include carob, olive, wheat, barley and some vegetable farming. Dairy cows, sheep and goats are kept. Forested hills border the village, filling the air with scented pine and wild herbs. Many species of trees, including Cypress, juniper and almond, as well as ancient olive groves, dot the landscape. Orchids and other wild flowers abound in season. Plenty of field roads and narrow tracks are found on the hills and flats areas, and as there's a conspicuous absence of fences, the surrounding area is attractive for walking and cycling. At the borders of the village, there are the churches of Saint George, Saint Afksentios and Saint Loukas. There are also the ancient churches of Panagia Kira, Saint George Parouzos, Saint Vasilios (in ruins), Saint Photiou (in ruins) and Saint Katherine (in ruins). Buyukkonuk was selected as a pilot village in the Karpaz for the development of eco tourism. It started with a craft shop for locally made handicrafts, then expanded to B&B, activity centre, meeting place and a start for tours, with the aim of saving traditional village life as part of the cultural heritage. Village activity tours and employing local traditions of food and crafts encourage sustainable development, letting visitors have a unique insight into village life while traditional culture is reinforced and maintained. The European Union and United States Agency for International Development (USAID ) assisted in the enlargement and refurbishment of facilities. Now there are 10 beds available in the B&B in 4 different self-contained, air-conditioned rooms, some with disabled access. ​ Activities that you can join in: Walk with shepherds behind their flocks of fat tailed sheep. Take joy in gambolling Try milking a goat, filling a bucket with warm frothy milk. Collecting eggs fresh from the nest for your breakfast. Firing a large village oven to bake sesame covered breads filled with cheese and olives. Harvest olives & pour them into a milling trough under giant stones to extract the golden oil. Explore earthy tracts between stone walled fields. Walk through nature’s colourful pallet during the wild flower season. Enjoy the scent of pine and carob forested foothills, lush green valleys and chequered fields. See grass turn into "Van Gogh" yellow sheaves that have inspired artists for generations. Sample healthy village fare such as bread dipped in olive oil, fall-off-the-bone meats of "firin kebab" or the unique delicacy of pumpkin flowers filled with rice and herbs. Basket or broom making Spinning Brick making Top Sightseeing > Cafer Pasha Hammam Baths The main square in Famagusta, today known as Namik Kemal Square , was the busiest part of the city in Ottoman and Latin times. The most important mosque in the city, the Lala Mustafa Pasha , along with the historic medrese and the Cafer Pasha Fountain and Hammam (bath), comprised the buildings that surrounded this square. The fountain can be seen to the right of the entrance to the Venetian Palace. ​ It was built in 1597 and named after an Ottoman general. Across from the fountain is the Cafer Pasha Bath . Although the bath dates to 1605, the dressing rooms are much older, originally part of the 14th century St Francis Church. The rest of the baths are typically Ottoman Turkish, with domed hot and cold rooms. Top Sightseeing > Cengiz Topel Monument Towards the end of 1963, Greek Cypriots on the island initiated ethnic cleansing of Turkish Cypriots. Over the following months, 100+ villages were evacuated and the villagers moved into enclaves, including Erenkoy on the northwest coast of the island. In August 1964, the Greek Cypriot National Guard started action against Erenkoy. It was one of the last ports under Turkish Cypriot control and the Greeks believed that militia were landing supplies and weapons from Türkiye. A land and sea operation was carried out by thousands of professionally trained soldiers under the command of the retired Greek General and leader of EOKA, Georgios Grivas. EOKA was a Greek Cypriot organisation that fought a campaign for the end of British rule in Cyprus, for the island’s self-determination and for eventual union with Greece. The defenders of Erenkoy, which mainly consisted of 750 university students, managed to hold their positions till the 8th August, when the Turkish Air Force intervened through its right as a Guarantor Power of Cyprus. Erenkoy Resistance Against this backdrop on August 8, 1964, Cengiz Topel, a fighter pilot of the Turkish Air Force, was part of a combat mission in what is known today as the “Erenkoy Resistance ”, which supported the besieged villagers. He led a four-fighter flight of the 112th Air Squadron but his Topel F-100 Super Sabre was hit by 40mm anti-aircraft fire from a Greek Cypriot gun emplacement and shot-down as he was strafing a Greek Cypriot patrol boat. Cengiz Topel managed to eject from his aircraft and made a safe parachute jump over land, but was promptly captured by Greek Cypriot villagers and taken to the British hospital. Members of the Cyprus National Guard removed Topel from his hospital bed and took him to their headquarters. An autopsy of his body showed that there he was heavily tortured and eventually murdered, his corpse shot at several times. The 29-year-old’s corpse was returned on August 12, 1964 to the Turkish authorities. On August 14, 1964, he was laid to rest at the Edirnekapı Martyr’s Cemetery in Istanbul. ​ Aftermath Topel’s bravery together with those of the outnumbered students saved the village and following the end of hostilities, UN forces returned to the area, bringing humanitarian aid to Turkish Cypriots. But the war for Erenkoy villagers, like Turkish Cypriots in other enclaves, wasn’t over. For over a decade, they continued to endure harsh conditions as they remained encircled by Greek Cypriots who would mount occasional attacks. It was not until 1974 that the conflict would finally end. ​ Legacy Cengiz Topel was the first Turkish pilot to die in action. To recognise his heroic efforts, a hospital in Yesilyurt, near Lefke, was renamed the Cengiz Topel Hospital in 1975. A monument was also erected on the coastal road in the village of Gemikonagi near Lefke, where he had landed by parachute, in commemoration of his heroics, and is open to the public. In Türkiye, a former Turkish Air Force base located near İzmit, currently in use as Cengiz Topel Naval Air Station, is named after him. A bronze statue erected in his honour in Eskisehir depicts him in flight suit. Several sites, schools and hospitals in Northern Cyprus and Türkiye are named after him. ​ Erenkoy Today, Erenkoy, also known by its Greek name Kokkina, is an exclave of Northern Cyprus. Greek Cypriot sanctions mean that the exclave can only be accessed from the rest of North Cyprus by sea, as the coastal road is impeded. Visitors to the now uninhabited village of Erenkoy, will find caves in the nearby mountains, which were dug during the conflict so Turkish Cypriots could escape fierce shelling they regularly had to endure during the conflict. Top Sightseeing > Chain Tower In the Middle Ages a chain suspended between two towers defended the entrance of Kyrenia’s harbour, like the chain across the Golden Horn in Constantinople. William de Oldenburg, who visited Cyprus in 1211 during the reign of King Hugh I, referred to Kyrenia as “a small town well-fortified, which has a castle with walls and towers”. He perceived the chain tower as part of Kyrenia’s fortification system in that time. The Byzantines had already fortified the city, but in the 13th century, during the Longobard war, before the siege of the city, Frederick II’s party, under the direction of Captain Philippo Genardo, improved the defences of the city. The chain tower is still visible today on the north side of the old Kyrenia harbour. It consists of an 8.15 m diameter cylindrical tower and a 1.5 m diameter pillar on top of it. Often mistaken for a lighthouse, the iron chain was stretched across the entrance of Kyrenia Harbour between two towers, the other being the old Customs House located at the urban entrance of the harbour. The chain was suspended across the harbour entrance to block hostile shipping and defend the city against threats. Top Sightseeing > Dervis Pasha Mansion Dervis Pasha Mansion (Derviş Paşa Konağı ) is an historical mansion and ethnographic museum in the Arab Ahmet quarter of Nicosia, and considered to be one of the finest examples of Ottoman architecture in Cyprus. It lies on Beliğ Paşa Street , has two floors, and was built on an earlier Gothic building on the same site. Built in 1801, it was repaired in 1869 with ornate wood carvings. It belonged at the end of the 19th century to Hacı Ahmet Derviş Efendi, who owned large swathes of land outside Nicosia and was the editor of Zaman newspaper, the first Turkish periodical in Cyprus published between 1891 – 1900. He was a leading figure in the Turkish Cypriot community and also a member of the assembly that ratified decisions of the British colonial administration. The lower floor is made of stone, while the upper floor is adobe (mud brick). Its architecture is heavily Ottoman and reflects the lifestyle of the time. It has two entrance doors, one for men (selamlik) and one for women (harem). It has a large inner courtyard, which was used by household members for relaxation without exposure to the outside. It's considered to be one of the finest examples of Ottoman architecture with whitewashed walls, plain yellow-stoned arches, terracotta roof and blue woodwork. The main room, which is an extension expanding over the street, is ‘Baghdadi ’ style, timber-framed with stone filling and a roof displaying eaves, like a bay window. In 1979, the mansion was in the danger of collapse and was purchased by the Turkish Cypriot state in 1981. Following renovation, it opened to visitors as an ethnographic museum on 21 March 1988. It was notable as the first significant renovation project in Northern Cyprus. Inside, examples of traditional Cypriot lifestyle, such as kitchen utensils, instruments for needlework, as well as old swords and historical clothes, are on display, while the furnishings of the bridal room, dining hall and living area, illustrate the household rituals of the time. The large inner courtyard was once used by the household for private recreation. The inhabitants of the mansion lived on the upper floor whilst the ground floor was allocated as servants’ quarters and used for storage. Top Sightseeing > En komi Village This acient city is thought to have been the first capital of Cyprus and dates back over 4,000 years. Also referred to as Alasiya, it's located near to the present-day village of Tuzla, north of Famagusta. Excavations have revealed the city was initially under Egypt and later Mycenae influence. It was a large orderly city with a prosperous trade and surrounded by fortified walls. It was originally built on a rocky plateau west of Tuzla, on the river Pedieos, the longest waterway in Cyprus. Copper ore was transported to Enkomi, where it was smelted and shipped for export as the river was navigable and had an inland harbour. The metal trade continued into the Late Bronze Age and was recorded in correspondence between the Pharaoh and the King of Alasiya. It's unclear if "Alasiya" referred to just Enkomi, the region, or to Cyprus as a whole but the exchange confirms Alasiya as a major supplier of copper to Syria and Anatolia. Excavations have discovered several areas where metallurgy took place and the name is found on texts written in Egyptian, Hittite, Akkadian, Mycenean and Ugaritic. . Much of what you see today is the remains of reconstruction after it was devastated by the “Sea People ” who invaded eastern Anatolia, Syria, Palestine, Cyprus, and Egypt toward the end of the Bronze Age. around 1200 BCE. The earlier town was built ad hoc, but the new town was rebuilt on a grid system, with long east-west avenues and a north-south main street. In 1075 BCE, it was hit by an earthquake, then around 1000 BCE, the inland harbour silted up and decline set in. As Enkomi declined, nearby Salamis began to thrive, and the last inhabitants of Enkomi migrated there. Most of today's ruins are from the rebuilt city, which never recovered its ancient grandeur. In 1896 as part of the Turner Bequest expedition to Cyprus, the first excavations on the island were conducted by the British Museum. Two bronze statues of gods were found on what was thought to be ceremonial buildings. The “horned god ” is a bronze statuette which reveals the influence of Hittite art, depicting a God, possibly Apollo , wearing a horned helmet. The “ingot god ”, is wearing a horned conical hat and greaves, shield and spear, and stands on a miniature hide-shaped ingot. Other notable finds include the “Enkomi Cup” which used niello decoration making it one of the earliest uses of this technique – a black mix of sulphur, copper, silver, and lead, used as an inlay on engraved or etched metal, especially silver. Most of the discoveries are in a collection of 1,800 objects or fragments in the British Museum in London Top Sightseeing > Gambler's Inn The Kumarcilar Han, also called the Gambler’s Inn, is a caravansarai (an Inn with a central courtyard) located in Nicosia. Thought to be built around the end of the 17th century, it's much smaller and modest when compared with Büyük Han , but nonetheless typical of an Ottoman inner city commercial inn. In the middle ages, merchants used to group themselves together according to their trades. When travelling, merchants from the same town or trade would favour certain hans, which would tend to assume the name of that town or trade. The Gambler’s Inn was originally known as the Violinist’s or Fiddler’s Inn and it's not known when or why the name changed. Similar to all caravansarai, the entrance leads to an open-air courtyard, which is surrounded by a two-storey building, originally containing 56 rooms. Upper floors were used by travellers, ground floor for their animals and belongings. The ground floor rooms have stone floors and an external window. ​ A stair leads to the upper storey, where the floor is marble and some rooms contain fireplaces. A monumental carved gate at the entrance dates to before the Ottoman conquest, and experts believe the structure stands on a much earlier building, possibly the ruins of a monastery. This Han has been fully restored and is used as an attraction with cafes, restaurants, arts and craft shops. Top Sightseeing > Geçitköy Dam Geçitköy Dam is a rock-fill dam on the Mandara River about 5 miles west of Lapithos. It was originally completed as the Dağdere Dam in 1989, but between 2012 and 2014 it was raised and expanded from 1.8 million cubic metres to 35 million cubic metres. The dam receives water from the river and via an undersea pipeline from the Alaköprü Dam , in the Mersin Province of Türkiye, topped-up by by an underground aquifer and hundreds of small shallow wells. Water from Türkiye first entered the reservoir on 17 October 2015. From there it’s transferred via pumps to Girne which lies to the east. ​ Getting There To get there, follow the main coastal road towards Camlibel and Mavi Kosk house (The Blue House). You can view the dam from the road but probably the best place for a photo would be The Blue House . The Views You can’t go on top of the dam, but the view from the road above is still amazing and the panoramic view of the water reservoir is stunning. Picnic areas abound, as do car shade ports and viewing galleries. ​ The Walks If you fancy walking round the reservoir be aware it’s at least 3 or 4 hours and if you take your time for lots of photos, it could be more. The pathways have lots of trees and wild flowers beside them and there's a number of viewing towers along the way. You’ll even find some nice places to fish, if that takes your fancy. Top Sightseeing > George VI Monumnet This cylindrical monument is in the centre of Lefke . ​ It takes the form of a water storage tank, and was built to commemorate the coronation of George VI who was crowned in 1937 following the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII. Top Sightseeing > Greco-Roman Rock Tombs Kyrenia has around 70 known tombs, a few of which are especially distinctive. Romans built cemeteries outside towns. Kyrenia town was East of the Castle, which means graves were west. Nowadays, the modern town is further west than that of the Romans, so the area that was rich with catacombs has been largely built on in recent years, although some are still found in cellars of buildings. When one is found, it's excavated, and any finds removed for study. Some tombs were carved into rock face in the town centre and can be found within the car park on the ‘Turgut Tahsin ’ road. In the old part of town, opposite the Icon Museum, are the remains of catacombs dating to 400AD but they can sometimes be concealed beneath overgrown plants. Along from the Chrysopolitissa Church , you'll find the entrance to a steep passage taking you to an underground chamber. This tomb, unlike others is entirely subterranean and is only open by arrangement with the custodian of Kyrenia Castle. Top Sightseeing > Güzelyurt Archaeology & Nature Museum This petite site opened as a museum in 1979 after restoration. The building was originally the palace of the Bishop of the region and housed town offices up to 1974. It consists of a natural history section , where flora and fauna of North Cyprus are displayed, and an archaeological floor which exhibits the island’s rich historical past from the Neolithic and Bronze Ages. A further room offers a display of finds from the Tumba Tou Skuru settlement. The courtyard serves as an open-air museum, exhibiting pieces from Classical, Hellenistic and Roman periods. Since their discovery in 2005, the ‘Golden Leaves of Soli ’ have been on display at this museum and are of great archaeological importance and aesthetics. The most breath-taking of all artefacts are the ethereal tiara of gold leaves, artfully and delicately intertwined. Another important work is the 2nd century AD statue of the Anatolian Goddess Artemis of Ephesus , discovered at the Salamis ruins in 1980. This plain museum is around the corner from the major tourist attraction of St Mamas Church and Icon Museum. If you have some time, stroll over to this little museum and you’ll be richly rewarded. Top Sightseeing > Hz. Omer Tomb For centuries, tombs have held great significance for Turkish Muslims. They may visit tombs to pray for healing, or to seek relief for pain in their life, particularly during Ramadan. 6km east of Kyrenia, on the coast near Çatalköy , lies the tomb of Hazreti (Saint) Omer , a holy place according to Islamic belief. Completely out of sight, with spectacular views of the Five Finger Mountains and the Mediterranean, the tomb is an exquisite and peaceful location. It's the final resting place of Commander Omer, and 6 others. It dates from the Arab raids of the 7th century, although there was almost certainly a local pagan shrine before then. The small mosque and Mausoleum were built by the Ottomans and the bodies were exhumed and buried again. ​ In typical Cypriot fashion, the tekke or Dervish convent which grew up around the tombs was venerated by both Orthodox and Muslim communities over the years. It was also renovated in the 1950s, and today you'll find fascinating tapestries and rugs within the tomb. Top Sightseeing > Is kele Archaeology Museum After 18 months of work, this new building was completed and opened in Iskele in 2018. The Iskele-Karpaz region is where evidence of the first human settlements in Cyprus were discovered and this museum houses over 2,000 artefacts that were previously stored in St Barnabas museum. The exhibits are from 8 historical periods, from Neolithic through to the Roman era. ​ The cultural heritage of many civilisations has been carried through to this new gallery, displaying over 10,000 years of history. The artefacts on show have been collected, preserved and brought together from various local excavations. Modern as it is, this museum was designed to serve all ages. The relics and delicate pieces include jewellery, fine pottery, large sculptures and antiques. Top Sightseeing > Kantara Castle Of the 3 crusader castles on the Five Finger Mountains, Kantara is furthest east. At 700m, it’s the lowest of the 3 but commands the Mesaoria Plains and Karpaz Peninsula . The first time Kantara is mentioned in written records is when Richard the Lionheart conquered Cyprus in 1191. In 1391, the castle was re-fortified by King James, when it had extensive walls built around it. When the Venetians took over the island in 1489, the castle continued as an important garrison but gradually fell into ruin. A visit to Kantara today reveals the ruins of old defensive emplacements, soldiers accommodation, water cisterns, vaulted rooms, watch towers and breath-taking views. The documented history of Kantara coincides with that of St Hilarion and Buffavento . The castles were all built during the Byzantine period, after the coast was overrun by the Seljuk Empire or as a countermeasure to the First Crusade. The name of the castle apparently derives from the Cypriot Maronite Arabic word “kandak ” which means stone bridge. It saw military action when the Genoese attempted to take the island in 1372 and proved adamant in defence against the forces of James I King of Cyprus, as it had a birds eye view along the Karpaz peninsula, and an unequalled vantage point over opposing forces from Famagusta. In common with the other two castles. it was deemed of no further military use by the Venetians who partially dismantled it and it’s very much as it was hundreds of years ago. Getting to the highest point is not too strenuous a climb and only takes a few minutes. A gravel path winds upwards and passes a cistern on the right. The gate house that once was protected by a portcullis, has a guard house to the right, while the path continues up into the barbican of the lower ward. The north east and south east towers are evident, and a further short climb leads into the upper ward. At this level Kantara reveals its completeness. ​ Although the upper floors were removed hundreds of years ago, there’s still the lower rooms of the guard house, Castellan’s apartments, barrack rooms, vast storerooms and deep cisterns. Following the line of the perimeter walls will show remains of further dwellings and breath-taking views at every turn. The north east tower contains a long room, equipped with tall arrow slits that allowed archers to fire on the enemy below but remain protected. A walk around Kantara shouldn’t be hurried. This is the castle of 101 rooms and, according to legend, anyone who finds the 101st will enter Paradise! Serving as a watchtower for pirate raids, an administrative centre and a prison, the castle saw next to no fighting. In 1191, it was taken by Richard the Lionheart, who sold the island to the Knights Templar, then resold it to Guy of Lusignan, the former king of Jerusalem, who became the first king of Cyprus in 1192. The Lusignans continued their reign interrupted only by occasional palace coups. In 1373, Cyprus was invaded by the Republic of Genoa, who imprisoned the local nobility. According to Philip of Novara's chronicle, Prince John of Antioch managed to escape from Famagusta after disguising himself as the valet of his cook. He fled to Kantara, from where he organised a successful counter offensive that expelled the Genoese. Recognizing the importance of the three Kyrenian castles, James I of Cyprus and Peter II of Cyprus vastly expanded their fortifications. During their reign Kantara was transformed into a garrison castle, barracks and an enormous cistern was erected. Another cistern located at the basement of the castle was converted into a prison and later made into rooms for the captain of garrison. In 1489, the Republic of Venice acquired the island, and by 1519 Italian engineers branded the castle as obsolete, which led to the Kyrenian mountain castles falling into disuse. In 1905, the castle was classified as historic heritage and in 1914, underwent restoration in an effort to attract sightseers. In 1939, the foundation of the horseshoe tower was refurbished in order to prevent it from collapsing. ​ Architecture Kantara is around 2,000 feet above sea level, surrounded by ridges of barren granite and sandstone bedrock which were used as the main building materials. Most of the buildings are coated with thick layers of plaster to cover the poor quality of the materials, while doors, windows and quoins were transported from elsewhere. Lack of water led to the collection of rainwater via flat roofs connected to cisterns through a drainage system. Among the six cisterns used, the largest stood outside the walls. Buildings contained bread ovens and perhaps even a mill. The surrounding 120 by 70 metres (390 ft × 230 ft) wall contained ten garrison rooms, which were constructed in the late 14th century, connected with a latrine. A concealed postern, guarded by two towers, lies on the south–west corner of the castle. To the south of the main gate, a rectangular, barrel vaulted keep was used as a prison but later converted into a cistern. The centre of its northern wall has a late 14th century Frankish window built from what once was an embrasure. The shape of the embrasures indicate they were mainly used by crossbowmen. At the top of the castle stand the ruins of "The Queen's Chamber ", an alleged fortified chapel destroyed in a Turkish naval bombardment in 1525 and looted in the 19th century. Top Sightseeing > Karaoğlanoğlu Memorial To understand the significance of this memorial site and museum, a brief overview of Cyprus history is required. When the Ottoman empire took control in 1461 of what we today know as Greece, the Greeks preserved their culture through the Orthodox church . When the Ottomans arrived in Cyprus in 1571, they freed the Orthodox church from Latin control, allowing Greeks to influence and control the Orthodox church to such an extent there was eventually little difference between religious activities and political activities. In 1832, after a long and bitter war, Greece was granted independence from the Ottomans although Cyprus wasn't part of the agreement. When the British arrived in 1878, Greek Cypriots hoped they'd grant Cyprus Enosis , union with Greece. That wasn't to be the case and from the 1930’s a gradual escalation of civil unrest was seen, largely instigated by the church. ​ In 1955, EOKA was formed as a terrorist organisation with the sole aim of getting the British out and absorbing Cyprus into Greece. Little thought was given to what Turkish Cypriots, living peacefully on the island, would think of this. EOKA violence escalated against not only the British, but anybody that didn't support Enosis, resulting in more frequent atacks against Turkish villages. In 1959, the London and Zurich agreements resulted in the independence of Cyprus , and Greek Cypriots saw this as a stepping stone to Enosis. In 1963, a secret plan was drawn up which discarded the 1960 constitution that had enshrined power sharing. As part of this plan, Turkish Cypriots were gradually displaced from their villages and placed in enclaves. In December 1963, violence against Turkish Cypriots erupted, and continued for several years, gradually separating the island into Greek and Turkish community areas. In 1974, a Greek sponsored coup overthrew Archbishop Makarios with the intention of forcing Enosis onto the island. To prevent this, Prime Minister Bülent Ecevit , invoked Turkey's rights to intervene under the Treaty of Guarantee, and on 20 July 1974 launched what is known as the 1st Peace Operation. ​ “We are actually going to the island for peace, not for war, and not just for the Turkish Cypriots but for the Greek Cypriots as well,” Mr Ecevit told reporters at the time. This operation came 5 days after the Greek junta-engineered coup saw EOKA terrorist Nicos Sampson installed as the island’s leader. Scores of Greek Cypriots were killed by fellow Greek Cypriots during the violence. Sampson would later say in an interview with a Greek newspaper, printed in 1981, that had Turkey not intervened “I would not only have proclaimed Enosis, I would have annihilated the Turks in Cyprus”. A ceasefire was agreed at 4pm on 22 July 1974, leaving the Turkish Army in control of land, including the main road between Kyrenia and Nicosia. Attacks on Turkish Cypriots continued and the precarious situation of its own troops prompted Turkey to launch the second phase of its operation in August of the same year, eventually extending the safe haven for Turkish Cypriots to today’s boundaries. Turkish Cyprus declared its independence on 15 November 1983 as the Turkish Republic of North Cyprus. The Karaoğlanoğlu Memorial was built in memory of soldiers who gave their lives during the Peace Operations of 1974, and takes it name after the regiment Commander Colonel Halil İbrahim Karaoğlanoğlu , one of the first casualties in the first hours of operations. The story of the conflict is represented at the memorial as a factual presentation, with displays in English and Turkish. English speaking servicemen from the Turkish Army are also on hand as guides. The two columns that greet visitors at the entrance symbolise the door to Türkiye. Further in, a small military graveyard holds remains of casualties, including Colonel Karaoglanoglu, whose name was also given to the nearby village in his memory. The group of statues symbolise the Republic of Turkey and Turkish Republic of North Cyprus, built on four columns, representing the four-day duration of the first Peace Operation. The Peace & Freedom Museum next to the memorial has an indoor and outdoor area. The open air part is a display of vehicles and arms left by fleeing Greek soldiers, while indoors there's a display of photographs of the military action, artillery, as well as possessions and uniforms of some of the combatants. A short distance from the museum is the Peace & Freedom Icon at the actual point of the landings of the Turkish Army. The memorial is on the main road a 15-minute drive from Kyrenia Town Centre and is a a sombre yet interesting experience. Top Sightseeing > Karmi Village Inhabited mostly by British and German expatriates, lies a village on the mountain slope west of Kyrenia. Karmi, also known as Karaman , was abandoned by its Greek-Cypriot inhabitants in 1974 and in time, the old houses became derelict and the area turned into almost a ghost town. In 1979, the Council of Ministers decided to rejuvenate this small scenic village, while developing resident tourism. Great importance was placed on keeping the character of the village, while catering for the needs of modern accommodations. Traditional constructions were kept alive by using wooden rafters and rush mats for ceilings, restrictions were placed on roof placements so as not to spoil the village atmosphere, and each house had its own name written at its entrance. Archaeological excavations carried out in the area produced chamber tombs from the Middle Bronze Age, including blue ceramic beads and pots from the Cretan Minoan civilisation. It’s believed these may be tombs of mariners who sailed ships from Lapithos, and the evidence and confirm the island's commercial relations with surrounding lands during that time. The village holds the church of Virgin Mary in the central square and hosts visitors throughout the year, who can stroll along picturesque winding lanes and relax in one of the pubs and bistros, admiring the seasonal floras and fresh aura surroundings. Top Sightseeing > Kyrenia Castle & Harbour Kyrenia Castle & Harbour Kyrenia Castle lies at the entrance to the town's famous harbour, and stands majestic guard over the port. The Castle and Harbour are the most visited place in Northern Cyprus due to a remarkable state of preservation and being fully accessible to the public. The horse-shoe shaped harbour is one of the prettiest to be seen in the whole of the Mediterranean. The Castle offers a fascinating glimpse into Cyprus history, provides stunning views to visitors and is home to a shipwreck museum, which is one of the world's most important and well-preserved pieces of marine history. ​ The Castle Kyrenia has existed since the 10th century BC, but the first evidence of the castle is from Roman times and was subsequently fortified by the Byzantines with four towers linked by walls. It provided refuge for the Isaac Comnenos family, then despotic ruler of Cyprus, against Richard the Lionheart. It was strengthened and enlarged by the French Lusignans, but the current appearance of the Castle mostly dates back to Venetian rule from around 1489. The Venetians were concerned about invasion by the Ottomans, so set about fortifying Cyprus. The walls of Kyrenia Castle were enlarged, thickened and reinforced to defeat artillery attacks and to resist any siege. The Venetians replaced the original drawbridge at the castle's entrance, with the protected gatehouse that still exists today. They also kept the 12th-century Byzantine church of St George the Castle, safely within the walls. When the Ottoman invasion finally occurred in 1571, the Venetians seem to have given up without a fight! Very Italian. The exterior fortifications are in remarkable condition and look like they were constructed fairly recently. The entrance leads you to a central parade ground area, on the way passing a tomb of an Ottoman admiral. The central area is lined with guardrooms, living quarters and stables and ramps leading to defences on the upper sections of the walls. You can climb steps that take you to the Lusignan royal apartments and the small Byzantine chapel. In the depths of the castle, you’ll discover dungeons, storage rooms and the all-important ' magazines', where gunpowder was stored clean and dry, ready for use. The battlements of Kyrenia Castle are worth the climb for the view alone, and you can walk around the whole extent of the castle's walls. The Castle is also home to one of the world's most important pieces of marine archaeology. In 1965, divers off the coast of Northern Cyprus discovered what has been found to be the oldest recorded shipwreck. Dating back to 300 BC it was a trade ship, carrying cargo that included jars of almonds and wine and sank in about 100 feet of water just offshore. It was brought to the surface and is kept in a specially-controlled atmosphere to ensure its continued preservation and is shown with part of its final cargo. The shipwreck features on 3 Cypriot euro coins. ​ The Harbour Kyrenia is now a major tourist attraction with a relaxed, inviting and calming atmosphere. Pleasure boats and luxury yachts crowd around the quayside and diners fill waterfront tables from which it takes only a moment to recognise that many of the older buildings surrounding the harbour were once warehouses. These now bustle with new life as shops, bars or restaurants, but they once stored carob beans and powder for export, a trade for which the island was famous until recent times. Due to its strategic location, Kyrenia has always been involved in commerce and maritime. Ships would ply their trade down the Aegean coast of Turkey, taking in islands like Samos and Rhodes, before calling in to Kyrenia on the way to Egypt. With commercial shipping confined to the new harbour further east, Kyrenia harbour is now left for pleasure and for the romantics. Top Sightseeing > K yrenia Gate One of the 3 gates in the Venetian wall that encircle old Nicosia, it provides access to the city from the north. For over 1,000 years, Nicosia was a walled city, from the Lusignans through to the Ottomans . During the Renaissance era, the Venetians reconstructed great walls around the capital, threatened by the Ottomans. The 3 original gates were the Famagusta Gate in the east, Paphos Gate in the west and the arched Kyrenia Gate which is one of the old city’s primary entrance points. Built by the Venetians in 1562, it used to be known as “Porta del Provveditore ”, after Italian governor Francesco Barbaro . It had a portcullis and a lion of St Mark which is still visible. The Ottomans added inscriptions to the north wall with verses of the Holy Quran , praising Allah as the “Opener of Gates”. The gate would open with the dawn call to prayer and close with the night prayer. In 1821, the Ottomans added a guard chamber with a domed roof and renamed it the “Edirne Gate ”. The south facing wall has a marble plaque bearing the tughra, a calligraphic monogram of Sultan Mahmut II also dated 1821. ​ Still in perfect condition it's one of the most attractive historic monuments in Nicosia. The roads on either side of the gate, built by the British in 1931, are still main entry points into the old walled city, maintaining its significance to this day. Top Sightseeing > Lapidary Museum To the east of the Selimiye Mosque , this gallery is housed in a Venetian style, stone-built two-story building dating back to the mid-15th century. Lapidary is the engraving, cutting, or polishing of stones and gems. Researchers believe it was originally built within the courtyard of St Sophia Cathedral and used as a guesthouse for pilgrims and travellers. During British colonial rule, many stone works and pieces from the medieval period were housed here which included insignias, tombs and columns, all under the supervision of George Everett Jeffery , the curator of ancient monuments in Cyprus. The collection was consequently catalogued and turned into a Lapidary museum which was refurbished and opened to visitors in 2003. Other notable features in this museum are a sarcophagus belonging to the Dampierre family, remote descendants of the celebrated Crusader John of Ibelin , the Old Lord of Beirut; the tombstone of Adam de Gaures of Antioch, Marshal of Cyprus dating to the 13th century; and a marble lion of St Mark, the symbol of the Venetians. A unique Gothic carved stone window with elegant tracery of a style common to cathedrals in the 15th century, now stands opposite the main entrance to the museum. This was moved from the Lusignan Palace in Sarayonu Square, when the British demolished it in 1901. Sadly, this is the only trace remaining of this Lusignan palace. Top Sightseeing > Lefke Aqueduct With long and hot summer periods, in the past Cyprus has always had a significant shortage of water. Clean water supply to urban residential areas was always one of the most important concerns of Cyprus governors. Throughout the centuries, water generally depended on rain fall, snow fall on the mountains and natural springs, the main one located in Lefke. Since the Roman era, water supply to cities was handled from the fresh springs via aqueducts, the water carrying systems consisting of chains of wells, underground water channels and bridges. During sieges however, most of the conduits were demolished which created more shortages. At the beginning of the Ottoman administration, the existing water systems were inspected and repaired, and new ones added. The Lefke aqueduct was built around 1609 . With its bridge of 10 arches , it's considered one of the best Ottoman monuments of Lefke and is still used today for irrigating orchards and fields. Lefke, which has fertile fields leading up to the sea, also produced grain during the Ottoman periods so mills and water stretches were built for grinding. English explorer Sir Samuel White Baker , commenting on Cyprus in 1879, wrote that the stonework in the waterways that pour water into the mills that returned with water in Lefke was "elegant and braided". 10 of these arches have survived to this day. Top Sightseeing > Martinengo Bastion Part of Famagusta City Walls, Martinengo is a superb example of renaissance military architecture. Also known as Tophane , it's in the north west corner of the walled city, in a peaceful and secluded setting. Cyprus was a Crusader state from 1192 to 1489 and ruled by the French Lusignans. Then it was ruled by Venice until 1571 when the Ottomans conquered. When the Venetians arrived they realised the walls of cities weren't capable of modern defence, so started modifications and renovations. In Famagusta, the weak spot was the north west corner so in 1550, Venetian architect Giovanni San Michelle arrived to redesign and strengthen this area. While works were still ongoing, he died in 1559 and was buried in St Nicholas Cathedral in the town centre. ​ Reconstruction was continued by Luigi Brugnoli and finished in 1562. The only arrowhead shaped bastion, pointing inland, it's one of the Middle Age’s great examples of military architecture. The arrowhead shape gave it a large field of fire away from the walls, as well as allowing it to cover any breach of the moat area. The design was inspired by fortifications in Florence designed by Michelangelo , and dominated battlefields for 300 years even taking into account cannons and artillery fire to improve both defence and offence. Walls were 6m thick in places and used Earth to absorb any impact. Surrounded by ditches, it covered a huge area allowing it to house the largest Venetian cannons, so that fire could be pointed pretty much anywhere. Some lower sections were built into the bedrock to prevent tunneling and Dual ramps provided quick access for horses and heavy munitions to supply the cannons. Covering one square mile, an internal curved passageway allowed movement from one side to the other, chimneys ventilated gunpowder smoke, and gunpowder barrels and cannon balls were stored. During the Ottoman siege, Venetians under the command of Hiernino Martinengo were despatched to help the city but he died on route, and his body was taken to Famagusta. A popular commander, the bastion was named after him. By any standard, the bastion is a formidable piece of construction with every stone corner, angle and tunnel crafted with smooth precision. It's easy to imagine the fire power it contained and see why it took Ottoman forces 10 months to conquer. The nearby churches of the Armenians and the Carmelites are also worth a visit. Top Sightseeing > Mevlevi Tekki Museum Sitting immediately inside the Girne Gate within the Ibrahimpasa quarter of Nicosia, the Mevlevi Tekke is one of the most important historical and religious buildings on the island. A building designed specifically for gatherings of a Sufi brotherhood or Islamic mysticism, the Tekke was a place for spiritual retreat and character reformation. It has historically been used by the Mevlevi Order and now serves as a museum, distinguished by six grand domes surmounting a rectangular building. ​ Early History and Background A Sufi order that originated in Konya in modern day Türkiye, the Mevlevi Order was founded by the followers of the 13th-century Persian poet, Sufi mystic, and Islamic theologian known as Celaleddin Rumi, or more commonly Mevlana. The mystical philosophy that he expressed in his poetry and bequeathed to the Mevlevi order spread east from Konya, as far as India, ​ and then throughout the entire Islamic world. His teachings emphasised the individual soul’s separation from God during earthly existence, and the power of divine love to draw it back to the infinite on death. Rumi stressed music and dance as an expression of this mutual love and yearning, and so the Mevlevi followers became commonly known as the ‘whirling dervishes ’ due to their famous practice of continuously revolving as a form of remembrance of God. It's traditionally held that the present building or ‘mevlevihane’ is an enlarged continuation of previously established tekkes known as the Arab Ahmed Pasha and Ferhad Pasha Tekkes, constructed in 1593 and 1607. The Mevlevi Tekke was built in the early 17th century, on a piece of land donated by a landlady called Emine Hatun. When tekkes in Türkiye were closed as a part of Ataturk’s Reforms in 1925, some in the Turkish Cypriot community demanded the closure of the tekke. However this call was disregarded by the British administration of the time, and since the centre of the Mevlevi Order had moved from Konya to Aleppo, it decided to appoint a sheikh from Syria. The first such sheikh was Muhammed Selim Dede from Damascus, appointed in 1933 and who remained in position until his death in 1953. This however marked the beginning of the end of an era in which the whirling dervishes performed their sacred dance the “sema”, and the tekke finally ceased operation in 1954, the Mevlevi Order in Cyprus itself officially ceasing to exist from April 1956. After remaining closed for several years, the Tekke was reopened in 1963 as the ‘Turkish Cypriot Museum of Ethnography ”. On 17 December 2002, after extensive repairs, it became the Mevlana Museum, opened on the anniversary of his death, or “union with the beloved” as is the case in Sufi tradition. ​ Visit Today When it was first built, the Mevlevihane included a complex of buildings and extensive grounds. A kitchen provided food for the poor of the city, permanent accommodation was made available for dervishes and guest rooms for visitors. The inner courtyard was an area for contemplation, surrounded by an orchard in which almonds, pomegranates and figs offered fruit. An ancient well dated to the Venetians and a reservoir provided water to a fountain for ablutions. Today, the Mevlevihane has an arched doorway, above which an Ottoman inscription informs visitors they have arrived at the house of Mevlana. Behind the entrance is a courtyard with Ottoman tombstones collected from various locations in Cyprus, dating from the 18th century onwards. One of the buildings is the semahane, the auditorium used for the whirling sema rituals, the mihrapor niche in the wall indicating the direction of Mecca. Along the northern wall is a wooden balcony where accompanying musicians once performed. The beams of the wooden ceiling of the semahane rest on two square columns and a series of arches divide the room into two sections. The first contains an exhibition of Rumi’s greatest poem the Mesnevi, alongside a display of musical instruments, costumes worn by the dervishes when they danced, and various other reproductions and illustrations. The other is an exhibit of the only remaining dervish cell, in which cooking utensils, a table and other objects are displayed. The southwest doorway of the semahane next to the mihrab, leads to the chamber in which the sheiks of the Mevlevihane lie buried. A total of sixteen unmarked tombs rest beneath six glorious domes, extending south along Kyrenia Street. Photographs of some of the sheiks, manuscripts and various other items are displayed on the walls, while the tombs themselves are covered in embroidered textiles. Traditionally, as part of Turkish Cypriot heritage, a ceremony of the whirling dervishes is performed here around the 17th of December each year. Top Sightseeing > Minia Cyprus Museum Located in Tatlisu, about 50km/30 miles east of Kyrenia. in an archaeological area dating back over 1,000 years. It contains miniature models, usually on a scale of 1:25, of famous historical Cypriot monuments, displayed in the courtyard of a millennial church which belongs to the Byzantine period, with more artefacts planned. The miniatures include: ​ 18th Century Clock Tower 18th Century Ulu Mosque Apostolos Andreas Monastery Arab Ahmet Mosque Bekir Pasha Aqueduct Bellapais Monastery Büyük Han Carob Store Castle of Gaziantep Cyprus House Derviş Paşa Mansion Flour Mill Gönendere Mosque Hala Sultan Mosque Harnup Ambari Tatlisu Hatuniye Medresseh of Erzurum House of Veli Passa Hz. Omer Tomb Kyrenia Castle Kyrenia Gate Lefke CMC Bath Lusignan House Morphou Culture House Mosque of Hersekzade Ahmet Pasa Namik Kemal Dungeon Salamis Ruins Selimiye Mosque Sphink Gate St Hilarion Castle St Barnabas Monastery Statue of Artemis Tatlisu Settlement Venetian Column Yusuf bin Osman Mescit and Mosque The museum has been popular with tourists since it opened in 2015, and the number of models has consistently grown. It was inspired by the famous “Minia Turk” garden in Istanbul. Top Sightseeing > Namik Kemal Dungeon An historical building in Famagusta, famous for being the temporary abode of influential Turkish writer Namik Kemal. Known as the Shakespeare of Turkish literature, Kemal spent 38 months imprisoned here, between 1873 and 1876. Seen as a potential revolutionary and threat, he was exiled by Sultan Abdulaziz in 1873 after the first performance of his play ‘Vatan yahut Silistre ’ (Fatherland or Silistria) a drama centred on the Siege of Silistria. The play was considered dangerous by the government as it promoted nationalism and liberalism. The building Kemal was exiled to was originally part of the Venetian Palazzo del Proveditore but the jail building as it currently stands was built during the Ottoman era, in a corner of the ruined palace. The building has two floors. The lower displays pre-Ottoman Lusignan architecture and the upper is distinctly Ottoman in style. The building is L-shape with the lower floor made of ashlar stone, and the upper floor built using lath and plaster. The ground floor, with only one vaulted cell is rectangular shaped and has a low arched entrance door and barred window which opens onto the courtyard of the Venetian Palace. Although described as a dungeon, it's not underground. When Namik Kemal came to Famagusta, he first stayed on the ground floor. Notes found described his initial cell as too dark and unsuitable for living. It was just over 10 squares metres with no furnishings (where would you put them?!) . He was transferred to the floor above with permission of the Cyprus Governor, Veysi Pasha. Steep stone stairs at the side of the building lead to this storey which has two large windows, a landing at the front and marbled flooring. When Abdulaziz was dethroned, Namik Kemal was pardoned by Murad V and returned to Constantinople in 1876. He penned his plays ‘Gulnihal’ and ‘Akif Bey’ while imprisoned here. Restoration of the dungeon in the 1990's into a museum contains many of his belongings and documents. The same dungeon was also reportedly used by the British during the First World War. A bronze bust of Namik Kemal faces the square named after him, across from the dungeon. The founder of the Republic of Türkiye, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, referred to Namik Kemal’s works as a major source of inspiration, and today he still enjoys the status of a literary hero for many in Türkiye and North Cyprus alike. Top Sightseeing > Nicosia Venetian Walls During the Renaissance, Venetians constructed great walls around cities in Cyprus to protect against the Ottomans. Among the finest examples of these are the walled cities of Famagusta and Nicosia for which fortifications commenced in 1567. The Venetians commissioned military engineers Giulio Savorgnano and Francesco Barbaro to design the plans after the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, by the Ottomans increased fear of them. New walls replaced medieval fortifications built by the Lusignans, which were demolished. The Venetians destroyed palaces, including the King’s Palace , churches and monasteries to acquire building materials and get a clearer perspective for the defence of the city. The Venetian fortifications had a circumference of 5km, with 11 pentagon-shaped bastions and 3 gates, all named after noblemen who sponsored the construction, including Rochas, Loredano and Barbaro. Nicosia, like Palmanova in Italy and Valletta in Malta, became a practical example of an ideal city of the Renaissance, with its fortifications and urban life inside city walls. Gates to the side of bastions allowed the city to be better protected from siege, while leaving the upper wall unlined with masonry increased its ability to absorb the impact from cannons. ​ Nonetheless, the Venetians surrendered to the Ottoman Admiral Lala Mustafa Pasha in 1570. The Ottomans captured the bastions almost intact and they remained pretty much unchanged until the British era. A major tourist attraction, the walls and gates have undergone restoration and are recognised among the best-preserved Renaissance fortifications in the Eastern Mediterranean. Of the 11 bastions, 5 remain in Northern Cyprus and one is under the control of the United Nations. Top Sightseeing > Othello's Tower Othello's Tower in Famagusta is the ancient fortress which guards the harbour, built during the Lusignan period in the 14th Century. It used to be called "impenetrable fortress" due to it being nearly impossible to attack because of very deep ditches surrounding it. Also known as the Harbour Citadel , members of the royal family and their servants are believed to have lived there during the Lusignan period. Later, the Venetians took over the tower and turned it into a fort, which then provided residence for soldiers. Christoforo Moro, the governor upon whom it is generally believed Shakespeare based his tragic hero Othello, would more likely have lived in the Palace of the Provveditore. The tower was constructed around a central oblong courtyard with a square tower at each corner. On the ground floor, the kitchens, great hall, storerooms and servants quarters were situated, whereas the reception rooms and bedrooms were situated on the second floor. After Cyprus was sold to the Republic of Venice, the castle's square towers were replaced with circular ones to suit more modern artillery. After these modifications, a relief of the Lion of St Mark was engraved above the castle's main entrance. The name of Captain Nicolo Foscari , who directed the alterations to the castle, and the date 1492 are inscribed near the relief. Apparently Leonardo da Vinci advised the refurbishment in 1481. The tower was renamed Othello's Tower after Giovanni San Michele, the Venetian civil engineer who was responsible for remodelling much of the city of Famagusta. You can still gain access to the round towers, with the gun ports and smoke holes still clearly visible. It contains a refectory and a dormitory, which were constructed during the Lusignan period. The castle's yard contains cannonballs left behind by the Spaniards and Ottomans, relics of its turbulent history. One of the larger parts of the tower is the Great Hall , measuring 92ft by 25ft, which in size, easily competes with the refectory at the Bellapais Abbey near Kyrenia. In 1900, the castle's ditch was drained of water to reduce the risk of malaria. The castle began to be restored in 2014 and reopened to the public on 3 July 2015. Othello's Tower is well worth a visit if you’re sightseeing in Famagusta, as apart from the architectural wonder of the tower itself, there’s magnificent views to be had from the top of the tower over the city of Famagusta, with clear views of the Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque in the centre of the city. Top Sightseeing > Petra tou Limnidi From the Palace of Vouni in Lefke, you can see this small, yet immense, island. The Petra tou Limnidi, a small rock just across the water, is the site of the first settlement in Cyprus . This is one of the oldest places in Cyprus to be inhabited, and was excavated at the same time as Vouni, with artifacts found from the pre-pottery Neolithic Period. An excavation team swam to this small rocky island and excavated for 2 weeks in 1929. At the top of the island, which is only accessible from the east, remains were found of two rather primitive huts from the Neolithic period, one clearly divided into a living room and a kitchen with a hearth placed against the wall. Archaeologists revealed objects of flint, bone and stones including needles, utensils, farming tools as well as sculptures.​ Petra tou Limnidi is believed to have been an island even in those times, though the sea level was probably much lower than it is now, since no Neolithic remains have been found on the adjacent headland. It probably served as a very exposed temporary camp for fishermen from time to time. ​ The islet today is an important nesting place for the Yellow-Legged Gull and also used by the European Shag . If you’re visiting Lefke, the Palace of Vouni will be at the top of your list but you’ll have an opportunity to stare and just imagine the thousands of years of mankind this island has carried to this day. For the more curious, journey to the shoreline for a close up. Top Sightseeing > Porta Del Mare Gate One of two original entrances to the old walled city of Famagusta, this gate is remarkably well-preserved. When the Venetians took control of Famagusta in 1489, they started strengthening city walls in line with modern warfare and this program continued for over 70 years. The Sea Gate, or Porta del Mare, was one of the earliest projects to be completed, in 1496. Built in Italian Renaissance style by Venetian Commander Niccolo Prioli, it protected entrance to the city from the port. Built at an angle, enemies would see its superiority from far out at sea. Dominating the entrance is a large marble sculpture, sourced from the ancient ruins of Salamis, of the winged lion of St Mark , the patron saint of Venice. The lion has a book in one of its paws with the Latin inscription, “Peace to you Mark, the Evangelist ”. The iron portcullis that opens towards the sea is from the Venetian era, while the iron-clad wooden door that opens land side, was built by the Ottomans. On the land side, to the right of the Porta del Mare, you'll see another statue of a lion, again brought from Salamis . Legend has it this lion will open its mouth on one occasion only and anyone brave enough to put their hand inside will receive a very generous fortune, which may be a reference to treasures rumoured to be hidden by Venetian merchants below the Othello Citadel during the Ottoman Siege. To date, nobody has seen the lion open its mouth - yet. The port side of the gate is better seen from the Othello Tower, which you'll no doubt want to visit at the same time. Top Sightseeing > Railways of North Cyprus In Northern Cyprus you won't find any railway, metro or tram systems. You'll need to hire a car, get a dolmus (local small bus) or hire a taxi to get around. The only “train” is a distinctive yellow road train which runs from Oscar’s Resort to Kyrenia town centre. However, Cyprus did have an active railway for over 45 years. The Cyprus Railway was a narrow gauge (2’ 6”) railway network, which operated from October 1905 to December 1951 and was called the Cyprus Government Railway (CGR). It had 39 stations, stops and halts along the 37-mile route from Famagusta in the east to Evrychou in the west. It was built in 4 sections, with the original railway running from Famagusta Port to Nicosia, section II from Nicosia to Guzelyurt opening in 1907, and sections III and IV as an extension to the railway from Guzelyurt to Evrychou ​ opening in 1915 to serve the Cyprus Mining Corporation (CMC) . When the Cyprus Railway opened in 1905, there were 12 steam trains which used the line during its operational years, all of which were made in England by either the Hunslet Engine Company or Nasmyth Wilson and Company . ​ Some of these trains can still be seen scattered around the island, with the most well-preserved, Locomotive Number 1 , still standing outside Famagusta Station to this day. The trains travelled at 20-30 miles an hour and ran on coal brought in from England via Famagusta Port. The railway network was used for various operations, including passenger travel, with stations located every two miles along the route, with signs in Turkish, Greek and English. There were only two trains per day for passenger use, one in the morning and one in the evening. The government also used the railway for transporting mail, carrying timber from the Troodos Mountains and freight from Famagusta port. ​ The CMC used the railway for transporting freight, ore and minerals across Cyprus. Interestingly, some of the stations along the route also served as telephone exchanges and post offices/telegram offices as well as train stations. During both World Wars, the railway was also used to transport troops from Famagusta, Denizli and the airport. You can see the train as you go through Denizli by the old CMC Bar (now called Yakamoz Night Club ) as well as an old CMC steam tug and the abandoned jetty. Further up the road, again on the sea side, you'll find lots of mining equipment and conveyors used by the CMC Mining Corp. There’s also another abandoned CMC jetty called “CMC Maden Yükleme İskelesi” on Google maps. The ancient city of Soli nearby is also well worth a visit if you're in the area. The railway stations themselves were either knocked down or turned into Police Stations or warehouses, with the exception of Famagusta Station which is the Land Registry Office , and Evrychou which was turned into a dormitory for forest workers and which recently became the Cyprus Railway Museum . The museum is home to the restored Wagon 152 which sits under a shelter with the original hand-powered trolley, 100 metres of track and lots of information about the old railway. So next time you're driving from Famagusta to Nicosia along the motorway, spare a thought that you're actually driving on a large part of where the Cyprus railway tracks used to be all those years ago. Top Sightseeing > Rivettina Bastion Originally named the Ravelin by the Lusignans who built it to protect the main entry to the city, the name reflects its half-moon shape. Venetians took control of Cyprus in 1489 and decided they had to strengthen the walls of cities to withstand threats posed by the Ottomans and their large cannons. In 1492 they began 70 years of fortifications, some inspired by Michelangelo. The two gated entrances into the wall were the Land Gate and the Sea Gate or Porta del Mare. 3km of sea walls up to 18m high were built and the Martinengo Bastion and Land Gate, later known as Rivettina Bastion, were redesigned at great cost. Tours of the Famagusta Walls usually start at the southern end near the Rivettina Bastion which is the second oldest part of the walls after Othello’s Tower. It became part of huge defences laden with cannon, connected passages and chambers and configured to divide any assault force. In 1570-71, the Ottomans besieged the city. Although the walls were never breached, the Venetians surrendered after 10 months. The Ottomans renamed it Akkule, ("white tower"), after the white flag of surrender that was hoisted there. ​ Entrance to the city continued through Akkule, over a drawbridge and portcullis the Ottomans built. If you enter through this gate, you'll see frescoes and coats of arms dating to Venetian times and the Akkule mosque built by the Ottomans in 1619. Stairs lead to the top of the walls, from where you can walk across the Arsenal and continue until you reach the original Sea Gate, Porta del Mare. Top Sightseeing > Round Tower Kyrenia Castle was originally built in the 7th century by the Byzantines to protect the town from Arab raids. It was extended by the Lusignan’s and the round tower was built around 1300 using recycled Roman stones and was joined to other round towers by a curtain wall. The Venetians widened the original Byzantine walls making the Lusignan fortification largely redundant. The Lusignan walls gradually fell down, and by 1600 the Ottomans were so established they deemed it safe to build houses outside the walls. The round tower stood derelict for several hundred years becoming a roofless shell, until in 1987, a local businessman received permission to restore it. A fibre glass dome was added, a wooden gallery erected, and during excavation work a rough “shelf” was revealed. This and the floor were covered in natural stone flags. Since 1988, it's been open as a gift shop and art gallery displaying works by local painters. Although this round tower is the best preserved, there are remnants of others you can see. One is on the street leading from the Bandabuliya towards the harbour, and the another overlooks the harbour itself. Top Guides > Sightseeing > Salamis Ruins Salamis is an ancient Greek city-state, 6 km north of Famagusta. According to tradition, the founder of Salamis was Teucer, son of Telamon , king of the Greek island of Salamis, who couldn’t return home after the Trojan war because he’d failed to avenge his brother Ajax. Earliest archaeological finds go back to 11th century BC, when copper made Cyprus an important trading partner. Children's burials in Canaanite jars indicate a Phoenician presence, and a harbour and cemetery from this period have also been excavated. The town is mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions as one of the kingdoms of Cyprus. Although under Assyrian control, city-states enjoyed relative independence provided they paid their tribute to the Assyrian king. This allowed kings of the various cities to accumulate wealth and power. Certain burial customs observed in the "royal tombs" of Salamis relate directly to Homeric rites, such as the sacrifice of horses in honour of the dead and the offering of jars of olive oil. Most of the grave goods come from the Levant or Egypt. Originally, the town was confined to a small area around the harbour but expanded west to occupy an area which is now forest. The cemetery of Salamis extends from the western limits of the forest to the Monastery of St Barnabas to the west, to the outskirts of the village of Ayios Serghios to the north, and to the outskirts of Enkomi village to the south. It contains tombs dating from the 9th century BC down to the Early Christian period. The earlier tombs are within the forest area, near the boundary of the early town. Salamis had links with the Near East and the Aegean during the 8th and 7th centuries BC. One royal tomb contained a large amount of Greek Geometric pottery, the dowry of a Greek princess who married into the royal family of Salamis. In 450 BC, Salamis was the site of a simultaneous land and sea battle between Athens and the Persians. Under King Evagoras I (411-374 BC) Greek culture and art flourished in the city. A monument which illustrates the end of the Classical period in Salamis is the tumulus, which covered the cenotaph of Nicocreon, one of the last kings of Salamis, who died in 311 BC. On its monumental platform were several clay heads, some of which are portraits, perhaps members of the royal family who were honoured after their death on the pyre. ​ After Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire, Ptolemy I of Egypt ruled Cyprus. He forced Nicocreon, the Ptolemaic governor, to commit suicide in 311 BC, because he didn’t trust him anymore. In his place came King Menelaus, who was the brother of the first Ptolemy. Nicocreon is supposed to be buried in one of the big tumuli near Enkomi. Salamis remained the seat of the governor. In 306 BC, It was the site of a naval battle between the fleets of Demetrius I of Macedon and Ptolemy I of Egypt won by Demetrius who captured the island. In 58 BC, the Roman Republic annexed Cyprus and Ptolemy of Cyprus, the last Cypriotic king, committed suicide rather than surrender to Rome. Salamis became part of the Roman province of Cilicia governed from Paphos. Salamis suffered heavily during the Jewish rising of AD 116–117. Although itt ceased to be the capital of Cyprus from the Hellenistic period onwards when it was replaced by Paphos, its wealth and importance didn’t diminish. The city was particularly favoured by the Roman emperors Trajan and Hadrian, who restored and established public buildings. The "cultural centre" of Salamis during the Roman period was situated at the northernmost part of the city, where a gymnasium, theatre, amphitheatre, stadium and public baths have been revealed. There are baths, public latrines (for 44 users), various bits of mosaic, a harbour wall, a Hellenistic and Roman agora. and a temple of Zeus that had the right to grant asylum. Byzantine remains include the basilica of Bishop Epiphanos (AD 367–403). It served as the metropolitan church of Salamis. St Epiphanios is buried at the southern apse. The church contains a baptistry heated by hypocausts. The church was destroyed in the 7th century and replaced by a smaller building to the south. ​ There are very extensive ruins, with the theatre and gymnasium extensively restored. Numerous statues are displayed in the central court of the gymnasium, most of which are headless. A statue of Augustus originally belonged here. The theatre is of Augustean date and could house up to 15.000 spectators before it was destroyed in the 4th century. Water came via an aqueduct from Kythrea, destroyed in the 7th century. The water was collected in a large cistern near the Agora. The necropolis of Salamis is west of the town and contains a museum showing some of the finds. The best-known burials are the so-called Royal-Tombs , containing chariots and extremely rich grave gifts, including imports from Egypt and Syria. A tomb excavated in 1965 brought to light an extraordinary wealth of tomb-gifts, which show trade relations with the Near East. The "First Missionary Journey", was made by Paul the apostle and the Cypriot-born Barnabas, landing in Salamis after heading out from Antioch of Syria. There they proclaimed Christ in the Jewish synagogues before proceeding through the rest of the island (Acts 13:1-5). Tradition says that Barnabas preached in Alexandria and Rome , and was stoned to death at Salamis in about 61 CE. He is considered the founder of the Church of Cyprus. His bones are believed to be located in the nearby monastery named after him. Several earthquakes led to the destruction of Salamis at the beginning of the 4th century. The town was rebuilt and became an Episcopal seat, the most famous occupant of which was Saint Epiphanius. Emperor Constantius II helped Salamis with reconstruction and tax exemptions, and the town was named Constantia after him. The silting of the harbour led to a gradual decline of the town. Salamis was finally abandoned during the Arab invasions of the 7th century. Archaeological excavations began in the late 19th century and are now in the British Museum in London. Excavations started again in 1952 and were in progress until 1974 when international embargo prevented continuation. The site and the museums are maintained by the antiquities service, with important archaeological collections kept in the St Barnabas monastery. In the District Archaeological Museum there are marble statues from the gymnasium and the theatre of Salamis, Mycenaean pottery and jewellery from Enkomi. Several of the statues and sculptures from antiquity are disfigured, headless or mutilated, likely by Christian zealots in late antiquity, during the persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire. Buildings uncovered show The Temple of Zeus Salaminios must have existed since the foundation of the city. Early excavators discovered in the esplanade of the Temple of Zeus an enormous marble capital carved on each side with a caryatid figure standing between the foreparts of winged bulls. Now in the British Museum's collection, the function of the capital remains unclear, although it does indicate influence from Achaemenid art and is consequently dated to between 300 and 250 BC. Top Sightseeing > Seyyid Emin Efendi Water Cistern You'll probably come across this site if you're heading to Kyrenia Harbour. It dates back to Ottoman rule, who built public water taps for passer-by’s. Made of hewn stone and with an arched roof, it's located northeast of St Andrew’s Church . A marble inscription written in old Turkish reveals the water cistern was constructed by Es-Seyid Mehmed Emin Efendi , who was a clerk to the tax collector between 1816 and 1821 and later Governor of Cyprus in 1834. Collect it then spend it, so to speak. He also initiated the building in 1817 of one of the holiest places for Muslims in the world, Hala Sultan Tekke which is in Larnaca and is a listed Ancient Monument with thousands of pilgrims visiting each year. Top Sightseeing > Soli Ruins Soli is one of the ten ancient kingdoms of Cyprus dating to the 6th century BC. Near Lefke and southwest of Guzelyurt, what remains today at the coastal site of Soli dates mainly to the Roman era. It’s believed to have been founded by the Athenians returning from the Trojan Wars in the 13th century BCE and the region was first known as ‘Aipeia ’. A Greek statesman, Solon, advised that the city be moved nearer the shore to facilitate export of copper ore. The ruler of the town King Philocypros, who was also a pupil of Solon, duly obliged and the relocated city was renamed Soli. Rich in copper deposits, Soli had a good water supply, fertile soil and a protected harbour, making it one of the most important capitals of Cyprus. The city fell under the successive influence of the Hellenistic, Roman and Early Byzantine periods. In 498 BC, the people of Soli joined the other kingdoms in the Ionian Revolution against the Persians, who took the city. It was only in 449 BC and during the Roman period, that Soli became a prosperous city. By the 4th century AD, the copper mines were almost exhausted and its harbour silted up, leading to a period of stagnation for the city which gradually lost its importance. The city was destroyed during Arab raids of the 7th century and later by earthquakes and was finally left abandoned after a millennium of continuous occupation. What remains today is an impressive collection of structures and findings. ​ Roman Theatre Excavations in 1929 discovered The Roman Theatre, which dates to the 2nd century AD. It occupies the site of the original Greek amphitheatre, on the northern slope of a hill overlooking the sea below. It holds an auditorium of 17 rows of seats, carved in a semicircle out of the hillside rocks with some 4,000 capacity, restored though to only half of its original height. After the theatres of Salamis and Kurion, it is the third largest theatre in Cyprus. A grand semi-circular orchestra with great acoustics has also since been restored. the theatre consists of the skene (stage building), orchestra (middle section) and auditorium, The stage building is comprised of a number of rooms and corridors and would have provided space for the performers to get changed as wellas providing a backdrop for their performances.The middle semi-circular section, the orchestra, is the section wehre religious celebrations and plays would have taken place. The seats at the bottom of the theatre are made from carved rocks from the hillside, covered with cut stone. The upper tiers of seats have not survived. Admission to this area alongside the auditorium was gained through two side entrances, the audience separated from the orchestra through a limestone wall. As with many ancient ruins, the stones of Soli were recycled, those of the theatre used by the British for the construction of Port Said in Egypt in the second half of the 19th century. The former limestone wall is now part of this harbour. The original stage was made up of two levels, covered with marble panelling and decorated with statues. Some of the original masonry can be seen in the orchestra section. The theatre today is occasionally used for atmospheric concerts and plays. ​ St Auxibus Basilica An ancient coin found during excavations dates the basilica to the latter part of the 4th century AD, one of the first Christian churches on the island. According to Christian tradition, Soli is believed to be the place where Saint Mark baptised St Auxibus, a Roman Christian who later became the first bishop of the Church of Soli. When the first basilica was destroyed in the 6th century, a new basilica was built with two rows of columns. The mosaics in the narthex of the basilica date from this time. Built over several different stages, the initial build was a five-naved church, later modified into a three aisled structure in the 6th century near to 200 metres in length, separated by twelve columns some of which are still standing today. The small church has three doors and a courtyard that boasts a fountain ringed with further columns. ​ Mosaics One of the most prestigious finds at the basilica are its’ mosaics, found in the flooring, most of which have survived to the present day. Cyprus church mosaics were originally of geometric design, and gradually animal figures such as birds and bulls were incorporated and decoration from small coloured stone tiles were later created. The goose-like swan mosaic in the floor of the nave, surrounded by floral and four small dolphins, is the most recognisable and immediately catches visitor’s attention. The inscription in the mosaic set reads, “Christ! Mercy to those who have created this mosaic”. The narthex and the northern part of the basilica floor is decorated in art opus sectile mosaic, a type using geometrically tailored stones which originate from the 6th century. ​ Temples After the excavation of the theatre building, the Isis, Aphrodite and Serapis temples were unearthed. The Aphrodite temple is situated on a hill above the theatre but not accessible to the public. A famous sculpture of Aphrodite dating back to the 1st century was also discovered at this site, and the palace buildings from the Hellenistic period are also on this hill. ​ Tombs Recent excavations by archaeologists have unearthed many tombs from Geometric and Roman periods. One which was carved into the rocks is of a majestic three-tomb structure and is believed to have belonged to a noble. Valuable artifacts discovered include a golden throne, diadem and gold jewellery, as well as other metal cups, which are today exhibited at the Guzelyurt Museum of Archaeology and Natural History. The findings indicate a high level of wealth and power. Excavations have also uncovered a Hellenistic Period colonnaded avenue leading to the Agora, the local public gathering and market space, which holds the remains of a monumental marble fountain or nymphaeum which dates to the 3rd century. Corinthian pillars were used in its building. AN inscription records that it was dedicated to the Roman Emperor Caracalla. Generally, such buildings have a façade decorated with statues with the cistern behind. The traces of the ancient city stretch over a wide area and have still not been fully uncovered which just adds to the mystery when discovering this archaic site. Top Sightseeing > St Hilarion Castle St Hilarion Castle (Girne) To reach St Hilarion castle from Kyrenia, drive south toward Nicosia. As the road climbs into the mountains, and just before it gets to the top of the pass and begins it’s descent, follow the signpost off to the right. A side road snakes up through a military camp for about 3km past a large statue of a soldier in battledress at its entrance. The firing range on the left was once the site for medieval tournaments. Go up the sharp hill and you arrive at a small car park outside the castle gate. It takes about 20 minutes to get there from Kyrenia, but remember you’re in a restricted military area so don’t stop or take photos. ​ Setting Of the three magnificent castles in the Kyrenia mountains, by far the most accessible, popular and most complete is St Hilarion, one of the best- preserved Crusader Castles. Dramatically sited on a rocky crag with elegantly ruined turrets, towers and windows, writer Dame Rose Macaulay described it as a “picture-book castle for elf kings” and it inspired the fairy-tale castles of King Ludwig in Bavaria and Walt Disney’s Magic Kingdom . In spring when the wild flowers bloom, the views from the snack bar are to die for. St Hilarion appeals to those with an interest in history and those seeking spectacular views, because on a clear day you can see all the way to the Turkish mainland. Stout shoes and refreshments are definitely required. ​ Brief history The castle was named after St Hilarion, an obscure 4th century Syrian hermit monk, who fled from persecution in the Holy Land and lived and died in a cave on Mount Didymus (“Twin peaks”). Extremely self-disciplined, Hilarion reputedly never washed and built a following by banishing demons and performing miracles. The monastery’s strategic position, commanding the pass through the Kyrenia mountains and overlooking the northern coastal plain, was not lost on the Byzantines, who built a church and monastery here. Facing repeated Arab raids, they converted it into a castle, probably sometime in the 8th century AD and The French Lusignans improved and strengthened it in the 13th century. Along with Kantara and Buffavento castles, it was built as a watchtower to warn of pirates who raided Cyprus and the coasts of Anatolia. The first references to the castle are found in 1191 records and it remained strategically important for a while. until it became the summer resort of the French Lusignan nobility. Most of what you see today was built in 1228 by John d’Ibelin and it became not only a military stronghold but also a palace for the Lusignans nicknamed “Dieu d’Amour ”, loosely translated as Cupid’s Castle. This was the castle’s heyday with tournaments, knights and courtly intrigue, especially under the rule of King Peter I and Queen Eleanor of Aragon. It continued to be a castle of importance during the latter Lusignan period, but when the Venetians took over in 1489 it fell into disrepair and became the ruin it is now. ​ The Castle The castle has three parts. Parapets for the defence of the main entrance were fortified by the Byzantines in the 11th century; the lower section of the castle was used to billet soldiers and their horses; and the middle section contained the royal palace, kitchen, church and a big cistern. At the entrance to the castle in the upper section, there’s a Lusignan Gate with a courtyard in the middle. The panoramic view of Northern Cyprus from the Queen’s Gothic style window on the second floor of the royal apartments is superb and well worth the climb. ​ Inside The castle entrance includes a barbican leading to a large outer bailey, originally built by the Byzantines. Go right for the first of the spectacular views, then continue upwards along the “Main Road” . You’ll see as you climb a watchtower and to your left an impressive curtain wall that rises steeply to the upper parts of the castle. This outer bailey was where peasants and livestock could be withdrawn when the castle was under attack. The castle stables are now used as a small visitor centre, offering sketches and information about the Lusignans. Beyond the stables, the path winds steeply upwards to the tunnel-like gate of what is described as the “second section”. It’s a warren of alleys, buildings and rooms opening off a central tunnel, some of which were part of the original 10th century monastery. To the right is the monastery church now open to the elements, but with a well-preserved apse. North of here is the Great Hall, now home to the Café Lusignan. Along one side of the hall is a wooden balcony hanging over a staggering view of the coast below. On a clear day you can see Turkey, some 100km away. Beyond the hall are a group of rooms which serviced it – kitchen, buttery and privies – and a belvedere, a shaded vaulted terrace with picnic tables and arches and more of those superb views. Left of the hall are more workaday rooms and the castle governor’s quarters, which contain displays with mannequins, illustrating medieval life. Continuing along the path which tunnels through these rooms, right takes you to the barracks and Royal Apartments and left goes up to the third section. A very large cistern appears to have been built rather than carved out of the rock and then a path, partly steps, partly rock-strewn tracks, soars upwards. Just before you reach the top, a left fork leads to the isolated Prince John’s Tower, where several of John’s Bulgarian mercenaries were murdered. Turning right instead of following the path to Prince John’s Tower brings you to the main gate of the Upper Ward. Through the gate are a Byzantine tower, a kitchen, a cistern and a group of subsidiary buildings. Beyond them are a further set of Royal Apartments and the famous Queen’s Window, at which Queen Eleanor is said to have sat. From here glorious views to the west open out, with, in the foreground, the village of Karmi. All that remains to be seen is the Western Tower and the Zirve (summit) of the mountain, marked with a sign: “732m – Congratulations! You are at the peak”. ​ Prince John On January 17, 1369, Peter I, King of Cyprus was stabbed to death as he slept in his palace in Nicosia, supposedly by three of his own knights. He was succeeded by his son, Peter II. Queen Eleanor, now the Queen Mother, became convinced that her husband had been killed on the orders of Peter’s brother, Prince John. Despite rumours of her infidelity in the king’s absence, she vowed to avenge his murder. John had taken up residence in St Hilarion Castle, which he held with a force of Bulgarian mercenaries, while Peter’s other brother James, held Kyrenia. A Genoese invasion, possibly at Eleanor’s instigation, led, in 1374, to the surrender of Kyrenia, and James ended up as a prisoner in Genoa. Eleanor now turned her attention to John. Having persuaded him that all was forgiven, she warned the prince that his Bulgarian forces were planning to overthrow him. John responded by throwing several of them to their deaths from Prince John’s Tower. Eleanor’s accusations were almost certainly untrue and a Machiavellian-type plan aimed at bringing him closer and weakening him. The drama concluded when Eleanor invited John to dine with her and the young king in Nicosia. They ate in the very room where Peter I was murdered and, when the final dish arrived, she dramatically flung back the cloth to reveal her dead husband’s blood-stained shirt. This was the signal for retainers to appear and stab Prince John to death in his turn. ​ Unmissable St Hilarion Castle often features in publicity for North Cyprus and it’s really easy to see why. As you wind your way up the mountain pass, the castle stays hidden but as you approach the car park the castle suddenly reveals itself, merged almost impossibly into the side of the mountain in the most dramatic fashion. Visiting St Hilarion is absolutely unmissable. Despite the best efforts of the Venetians, much of the castle is intact and it is a truly breath-taking sight to behold from every single angle. Thanks to its mountaintop location, the views of the Mediterranean coastline, Kyrenia, and beyond, are jaw-dropping. Top Sightseeing > The Great Inn (Büyük Han) The Great Inn is considered to be one of the finest buildings on the island. Known locally as Büyük Han , it's the best-preserved example of Ottoman caravanserai (an inn with a central courtyard) architecture, and the largest in Cyprus. Located in the traditional market centre within the City Walls of Nicosia, it was built by the Ottomans in 1572, the year after they had seized Cyprus from the Venetians. Under the guidance and patronage of Muzaffer Pasha, the first Ottoman governor of Cyprus, Büyük Han was modelled after the Koza Han in Bursa. It was built to provide accommodation for travellers from Anatolia and other parts of Cyprus and originally named “Alanyalilar’s Han ”. Later when a new inn, the Kumarcilar Han was built nearby in the 17th century, as a result of the comparison made by the public between the two Hans, it was referred to as the Büyük Han (Big Inn or Great Inn). Square shaped, with 68 rooms over two floors, the ground floor rooms rimming the courtyard functioned as stables for horses, storage areas and shops, where traders could carry out their business, and the floor above was for accommodation. The rooms on the ground floor each have a low-arched door, arched window and a hearth. The windows of Hans were always high up, partially to deter thieves who saw rich merchants staying as a source of easy riches, and also because glass was very expensive at the time. In the centre of the inner courtyard is a mescit (Muslim prayer room), built with stones from other buildings and balanced on six pillars over a şadırvan (Ablution fountain). A grave that lies to the southwest of the masjid is thought to belong to a high-standing person who died while worshipping in the masjid. With two entrances to the Han, this design is rare and similar only to two others located in Turkey. Externally, the Han resembles a fortress, and when the British took over in 1878, the inn was restored for use as the Central Prison of Nicosia. Between 1903 and 1947, the building was used as an inn, after which it became a refuge for poor families where they could rent rooms cheaply until 1962. After spending most of the 1990s being restored, the inn has been revived as a thriving arts centre, consisting of several galleries and workshops, and has once again become the hub of North Nicosia’s Old City bustle . Folklore dance shows, piano recitals, drama displays are common nowadays. Top Sightseeing > The Royal Tombs The Royal Tombs, sometimes called the Kings Tombs given their scale and splendour, are located between Tuzla and Salamis, with the entrance to the complex close to St Barnabas' Monastery . It’s divided into two sections, yet has never been fully excavated since its exact boundaries are still unknown. One area contains high-ranking inhabitants of Salamis, and a second was for ordinary citizens. This site became famous in the 1950s because of the rich finds here. Treasure hunters did cause damage previously but entrances (dromos) were undisturbed, and it was in this area the richest discoveries were made. The tombs date to the 8th and 7th centuries BC. Some go back to the 11th century BC , suggesting that for some time, Salamis coexisted with Enkomi. In all, at least one pair of yoked horses has been sacrificed in the dromos, with or without a chariot. The wooden parts of these chariots had decayed, but left impressions in the soil with the metal parts still in place. The horses were likely to have been sacrificed as grave goods, to ensure their owners were able to ride their favourite mount in the afterlife. There were also human sacrifices, most likely servants, who could continue to serve their masters in the afterlife. The burial customs evident from these tombs are similar to those described by Homer in The Iliad . The horse-drawn hearse would be driven down the sloping dromos (ramp) to the entrance, along with other horse-drawn chariots, before the body was raised onto a funeral pyre and cremated. The ashes were then stored in a bronze cauldron inside the chamber, along with other grave goods, and horses and servants would be sacrificed. ​ Tomb 1 Two burials from different periods. The first had a bronze cauldron containing the cremated bones of a dead woman wrapped in cloth, with a necklace of gold, rock crystal beads and several thin sheets of gold. The shape of the tomb and the richness of the material suggests it belonged to a noble lady or princess. The skeletons of two horses were found on the floor of the dromos, with traces of the wooden parts of a chariot. These date to middle of the 8th century BC. The second burial, around 100 years later, was disturbed badly, but four horses' skeletons, traces of a two-poled chariot, as well as some metal parts of horses' gear and a chariot's metal parts were found. Tomb 3 This wonderfully impressive tomb, which contained only a single burial, is marked by a tumulus (man-made hill) which reaches a height of around 10 metres, although it's thought to have been even higher originally. It's now protected by a modern roof, and it's possible to see how the hill was constructed, with walls of rubble, supported by mud bricks. It contains one chariot with armour; a silver studied sword; bronze and iron-headed arrows; bronze shield; iron-headed spear and offerings of food and honey placed in amphora. The weapons and richly decorated tack suggest this was the burial site of a rich and important warrior around 600 BC, based on pottery found buried in the floor of the dromos. Looking down the dromos (sloping ramp approaching the tomb) towards the entrance, the construction of the overlying tumulus can clearly be seen. ​ Tomb 47 The largest tomb, alongside the Royal Tombs Museum. It has a spacious cemented dromos leading to a monumental temple in front of a chamber built of enormous well-dressed stones. This tomb was used twice for burials. In the first, two horses of a hearse were sacrificed. One of the horses had tried to escape when its companion was killed, but had twisted round the chariot pole and was found with its neck broken. The iron bits of the horses were still in their mouths, and the remains of leather frontlets and blinkers covered with sheets of gold on their heads. There was no trace of the chariot in this burial, and it was probably used as a hearse and placed with the body. At a later burial, six horses were sacrificed, yoked in pairs, with ornamental coverings, iron bits and blinkers and frontlets of ivory and bronze with relief decorations of lotus flowers. ​ Tomb 50 - St Catherine’s Prison This is perhaps both the most interesting and also the least typical of the Royal Tombs, with a domed roof that can be seen from the road as you approach the site. Originally the site of a tomb dating to the same period as the other tombs on site, around the 8th or 7th century BCE. A small chapel was built above this tomb in Roman times, and dedicated to St Catherine of Alexandria who, according to legend, was imprisoned here. As a result, its appearance differs significantly from the other tombs, although it does have a characteristic dromos leading down to it and the skeletal remains of two sacrificed horses were found during excavation. Some of the stones used in its construction were taken from other tombs, and a section of cornice used in the chapel matches that in nearby Tomb 47. It has two chambers, a large vaulted chamber, which was added in Roman times, and a smaller chamber, lying to the west, which is much older. It was used as a chapel from approximately the 14th century onwards with an altar in the smaller chamber, and an ikon of St Catherine in the larger chamber. ​ Tomb 79 Houses many of the richest finds. Had two burials in a short space of time towards the end of the 8th century BC. A four-horse chariot had its wheels held by magnificent lynch pins nearly 2 ft long, with a bronze sphinx head at one end, and a hollow bronze figure of a warrior at the other, wearing a crested helmet, body armour inlaid with blue glass, and a long sword hanging from a baldric. A two-horse hearse had bronze lion heads on the corners and on the front. The bronze gear of the horses lay piled in a corner, including breast plates with embossed designs of oriental animals and myths, and two side pendants showing the goddess Ishtar as mistress of the wild beasts. Also of oriental design was a bronze tripod cauldron, decorated with illustrations of griffins and bird-men round the rim. The principal find at this tomb was a number of ivories, including a gold and ivory throne and an ivory-veneered bed. Of the ornaments discovered, the finest was probably an openwork, two-sided plaque of a winged sphinx wearing the crowns of Egypt. Some of the horse skeletons have been left in situ, and there is a small museum on site showing some of the finds, although most are now elsewhere, the bed for example being in the Cyprus Museum in south Nicosia. When the second burial took place, it seems that the remains from the first were simply pushed further back in the burial chamber to allow the later, richer burial to take place. It was later re-used for burials during the Roman period, with niches for sarcophagi being carved into its walls during this time. When Tomb 79 was excavated, Roman pottery, lamps and the remains of clay sarcophagi were found inside the chamber. ​ There’s no evidence to show that the Royal Tombs belonged to the Kings of Salamis, but with the precious death gifts, and the monumental architecture of the tombs, there's no doubt they belonged to noble or rich persons. And the less noble or rich? They were buried at the Necropolis of Cellarka, which is to be found within this complex, as is Tomb 50 - St Catherine's prison. ​ Necropolis of Cellarka About 400 metres away from the Royal Tombs, and was used to bury common town people. A set of much smaller tombs, these were cut into rock with staircase access. Finds here indicate that sacrifices and feast ceremonies also took place in the dromos before the burials, however revealing more modest grave goods. Top Sightseeing > Varosha Ghost Town Varosha is 6.19 square kilometres in the southern quarter of Famagusta. It gets its name from the Turkish word varoş meaning 'suburb '. The place where Varosha is located now was originally empty fields where animals grazed. In the early 1970s, Famagusta was the top tourist destination in Cyprus with new high-rise buildings and hotels and one of the most popular tourist destinations in the whole world, attracting celebrities such as Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Raquel Welch, and Brigitte Bardot. In 1974 Varosha came under Turkish control, and has remained abandoned ever since. In 2004, The Annan Plan to reunify the island provided for the return of Varosha to the original residents, but this was rejected by Greek Cypriots in a referendum. ​ Buildings continue to decay with parts of the city have being reclaimed by nature as metal corrodes, windows are broken, and plants work their roots into the walls and pavements, and grow wild in old window boxes. ​ In 2014, the BBC reported that sea turtles were observed nesting on the beaches in the city. The main features of Varosha included John F. Kennedy Avenue , a street which ran from close to the port of Famagusta, through Varosha and parallel to Glossa beach . Along JFK Avenue, there were many well-known high-rise hotels including the King George Hotel, The Asterias Hotel, The Grecian Hotel, The Florida Hotel, and The Argo Hotel, which was the favourite hotel of Elizabeth Taylor . The Argo Hotel is located near the end of JFK Avenue, looking towards Protaras and Fig Tree Bay. Another major street in Varosha was Leonidas , that came off JFK Avenue and headed west towards Vienna Corner . Leonidas was a major shopping and leisure street in Varosha, consisting of bars, restaurants, nightclubs, and a Toyota car dealership. In a show of good faith, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) recently opened two of Varosha's streets to visitors. It has become a tourist attraction, with bike rentals, cafes, playgrounds and a beach volley court at the foot of empty buildings on the verge of collapse. Since the partial reopening of Varosha, apparently more than 400,000 visitors have walked its streets. On 19 May 2022, Northern Cyprus opened a 600m long X 400m wide stretch of beach on the Golden Sands beach (from the King George Hotel to the Oceania Building) in Varosha for commercial use . Sun beds and umbrellas were installed. Top Sightseeing > Venetian Column In the centre of Ataturk square in Lefkosa is the Venetian Column, locally known as Sarayonu . The granite column was originally at the temple of Zeus in Salamis, but was moved in 1489 to Nicosia, as a tribute to Venetian rule, which is why many think it was built by the Venetians although it wasn't. On top was the Lion of St Mark to symbolise Venetian dominance, and at the bottom, coats of arms of 6 noble Venetian families. The Ottomans removed the lion and toppled the column in 1550, leaving it in the courtyard of the Sarayonu Mosque. In 1915 it was re-erected by the British who replaced the lost St. Mark lion with a bronze orb and decorated the plinth with the dates of the demolishing and re-erection, 1550 and 1915. Where it stands today was occupied by raspberry trees when the Lusignan Palace was constructed. If you visit the walled city you'll pass this column. ​ In the same square, at the corner of the Law Courts, there's also a fountain built during the Ottoman period and a platform built by the British to celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953 , the announcement of which was made to Cyprus from this platform. Top Sightseeing > Venetian Palace Commonly known as the Venetian Palace, it was a royal palace in Famagusta built around 1300 by the Lusignan Kings of Cyprus across from St Nicholas Cathedral. It was used as living accommodation until the reign of Peter II in 1369, when it was partially destroyed by earthquakes, the central sections of the palace completely demolished, and only its grand façade and back courtyard walls surviving. The Venetians moved the capital of Cyprus from Nicosia to Famagusta and greatly renovated the palace ruins in 1552 – 1554, transforming the Gothic style features and replacing them with Italian Renaissance architecture. It was then used as the residence of the Venetian Military Governor, the Proveditore . The palace was an immense building and stood to remind the population of Venetian power and influence. The door to the palace opened up onto what was once the largest central square in all of Europe. ​ The final inhabitant of the Palazzo del Proveditore in 1569 was the appointed Captain General of Famagusta, Marco Antonio Bragadin , who led the Venetian resistance to the Ottoman conquest that began in 1570. He was famously killed in August 1571, enduring a slow death, starting with the carving of his ears, after the Ottomans took the city, the fall of which signalled the end of Western presence in Cyprus for the next 300 years. During Ottoman rule, structures of the palace were used as military barracks, a prison and as a site for military drills. Under British rule, the building was used for similar policing purposes. Amongst the Ottoman prisoners was Namik Kemal , the Shakespeare of Turkish literature, who was held here between 1873 and 1876, having been exiled to Cyprus after criticising the Ottoman Sultan Abdulaziz. There is a bronze bust of the novelist facing the square named after him, by the Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque across from the Palazzo. In mid-20th century, the remaining structures from the palace were evacuate,d and parts were moved into the Namik Kemal Dungeon Museum, displaying the late writer’s life and works. ​ Architecture The Venetian Palace was largely destroyed by the Ottomans, but what little remains is impressive, and is a rare example of Renaissance architecture in Cyprus, at the time of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci . The most noticeable surviving parts are the front façade, with its three arches, mirroring the triumphal archways of ancient Rome, supported by four genuine Roman columns raided from the ruins of the old nearby city of Salamis. Behind the façade are several arches that run parallel, much plainer in comparison, potential remnants of the original Lusignan palace. Above the central arch a coat of arms can be seen, those of Giovanni Renier , the Italian Governor of Cyprus at the time in 1557. Further in you’ll find a chapel and L-shaped wall that dates to the Venetian era. Small rooms facing the courtyard have been used as prisons or arsenals. The courtyard exhibits military equipment including modern cannons and cannonballs as well as ancient columns and sculptures, a delightful scenic spot to have a break when touring Famagusta. Top Sightseeing > Vouni Palace Vouni Palace is 9 kilometres west of Gemikonagi , past the town of Lefke. The site is reached by taking the signposted turn from the main road and following a narrow, steeply winding road all the way up the hill. The ruins may seem sparse, but the 360° views from the hilltop are glorious, and well worth the trip as they're some of the best in Northern Cyprus. Visitors during late winter and early spring will be met by orchids and other rare flowers that bloom and bathe the palace surroundings with colour. ​ History Located on steep slopes of a conical hill, Vouni Palace overlooked the city kingdom of Soli for over a century. In 500 BC, Phoenician and Greek city kingdoms were warring with battles on land and sea. Marion , a pro-Persian city of the kingdom, besieged the city of Soli and established a guarding settlement on an overlooking nearby hill. King Doxandros of Marion built Vouni Palace 250m above sea level, towering over the city of Soli, allowing both sea traffic and the city’s activities to be monitored without hindrance from afar. The structure was a military settlement until 449 BC, when Greek rule was established and the ruler of Marion was replaced by a pro-Greek prince making Vouni a Royal Palace . In 380 BC the palace, which had been a continuous threat to Soli, was mysteriously destroyed by a fire, so the history of Vouni Palace only lasted for over a century. Later documents reveal its foundations were further destroyed by Soli inhabitants. The palace resembles a typical Hellenic house, but with qualities and features which connect it to the more oriental middle eastern world. ​ Structure and Architecture Excavations have shown different construction periods. In 500 BC the core of the palace was built with strong eastern features, such as the tripartite division of official buildings into living quarters, large storage rooms and bathrooms. During the Persian period, further modifications were made to the structure and the number of rooms increased. During Greek rule, eastern architectural features were replaced, major alterations were made and the palace adopted its final character. The tripartite division was altered, the central area resembled a Mycenaean megaron (central hall), and a second floor was added. What you see today is made up of three terraces. The highest holds the remains of the Athena shrine . The middle terrace holds the palace which is believed to have had 137 rooms in total, surrounded by smaller religious buildings. The lower terrace faces the sea and contains housing with stone foundations and mud brick upper storeys which housed most of the residents. The site consists of the megaron , a large rectangular room with a central throne, rooms mainly on the eastern wing and a 7-step stairway leading down to the courtyard and cistern. These steps, at 16 metres, are the widest of their kind on the whole island. Column heads in the courtyard made of limestone, show the face of the ancient Egyptian goddess Hathor , although natural erosion has meant the facial features of the goddess of the sky, fertility and love have not made it prominently to the present day. The palace and the smaller surrounding buildings mainly comprised of temples, were surrounded by a wall, creating the impression of a fort. ​ Temple of Athena Outside the Palace there were several temples which were simple rectangular buildings with open yards and a variety of altars. The most important shrine is the one devoted to Athena , who was the goddess allied with wisdom, handicraft and warfare. Greek mythology says she was born from the head of her father Zeus , the first of the Gods. The temple is dated 5th century BC and has a courtyard, forecourt, and a large two storey rectangular enclosure built to hold two main entrances. Sculptures stood in the forecourt and a semi-circular altar was to the right of the entrance. The Temple’s main room was behind the enclosure and held a statuette of the goddess. ​ Water Works Vouni had a really sophisticated plumbing system. Cisterns were vital since Vouni had no natural water sources, so storage was created by digging out rocks to create natural wells. The large stone standing by the cistern in the courtyard was designed to hold a windlass which would have been used to lift water from the cistern. This stone has become the symbol of Vouni. If you look closely at the centre of the stone, you’ll see an unfinished carved face, thought to be a goddess. Channels were also made to link rooms to a constant supply of water. You can see remains of an elaborate bathhouse with evidence of a furnace below – one of the earliest examples of a fully equipped Roman hot tub. ​ Excavations The palace was evidently a building of great wealth and luxury, containing sculptures, works of art, and ‘Vouni Treasures’. Excavations in the 1920’s unearthed a baked clay cup, blackened by the fire, which destroyed the palace. Ornamented silver cups and bowls, as well as two magnificent gold bracelets, rank among the finest known examples of Persian gold work. Hundreds of coins bearing the stamps of the City Kingdoms of Cyprus including Marion, are also among the valuable findings. The temple has unearthed various offerings and several bronze statues, one of a cow and two identical groups in relief, each with two lions attacking a bull. ​ Soli & Petra Tou Limnidi Because Soli is so close, you may want to visit it on the same day, considering Vouni’s sole reason for being built in the first place was to spy on Soli. From the palace you can also see the small island of Petra Tou Limnidi, which was the first settlement in Cyprus. It was excavated at the same time as Vouni and where Archaeologists discovered Neolithic findings. These excavations were together described as the “Awakening of the Island ”. Visitors during the late winter and early spring months will be met by a rich array of orchids and other rare flowers that bloom and adorn the palace surroundings with colour. Top

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    Gizlilik Politikası Turkuaz Bay Topluluğu ("biz", "bize", "bizim"), Kuzey Kıbrıs Türk Cumhuriyeti ("KKTC") Turkuaz Bay, Esentepe'deki daire sahiplerini temsil etmek üzere yasal olarak kayıtlı kuruluştur. Bu Gizlilik Politikası, Tekliflerimizle ("Bilgiler") etkileşimde bulunan bireyler ("siz") hakkında hangi kişisel bilgileri topladığımızı, kullandığımızı, paylaştığımızı ve başka şekilde işlediğimizi açıklamaktadır. Bazı ülkelerin yasalarına göre, bilgilerinizi işlememiz için izninize ihtiyacımız olabilir. Bu Gizlilik Politikasında belirtilen bilgiler. İstendiğinde vazgeçme veya katılmama gibi aksi yönde bize iletebileceğiniz herhangi bir belirtiye tabi olarak ve yasaların izin verdiği durumlarda, Bilgi vererek veya Tekliflerimizle başka bir şekilde etkileşimde bulunarak, Bilgileri bu uygun şekilde kullanmamıza izin vermiş olursunuz. Gizlilik Politikası. BU GİZLİLİK POLİTİKASININ KAPSAMI Lütfen bu politikayı dikkatli okuyun. Sizin hakkınızda toplayabileceğimiz Bilgi türlerini, bunları toplama amaçlarımızı ve yöntemlerimizi ve (geçerli olduğu durumlarda) bunu yapmamızın yasal dayanağının yanı sıra veri saklama, haklarınız ve bunları nasıl elde edebileceğinizle ilgili bilgileri açıklar. Bize Ulaşın. Bu Gizlilik Politikası, aşağıda belirtilenler gibi çeşitli Tekliflerimiz aracılığıyla topladığımız Bilgiler de dahil olmak üzere hem çevrimiçi hem de çevrimdışı veri işleme faaliyetlerimizi kapsar: Dijital Hizmetler: Web sitelerimiz aracılığıyla yürütülen faaliyetler de dahil olmak üzere web sitelerimiz; Web sitelerimiz için listelenenler gibi uygulamalarımız aracılığıyla yürütülen etkinlikler de dahil olmak üzere mobil uygulamalar; Abonelik hizmetleri veya bizim tarafımızdan tüketicilere sunulan diğer akış hizmetleri ve görsel-işitsel içeriğimizi web sitelerimiz, mobil uygulamalarımız ve/veya bir internet servis sağlayıcısı, ödemeli TV platformu veya üçüncü bir tarafça sağlanan bir hizmet aracılığıyla aldığınız hizmetler. cep telefonu operatörü; Konsol oyunları; ve Üçüncü taraf sosyal ağlardaki sayfalarımız/kanallarımız/hesaplarımız. Bir tüketici veya misafir olarak katıldığınız etkinlikler (bir iş kapasitesinin aksine), pazarlama ve etkileyici etkinlikler, odak grup veya kullanıcı testleri ve tesislerimizde veya kiralık stüdyolarımızda düzenlenen özel etkinlikler. Bir kaynaktan topladığımız Bilgileri başka bir kaynaktan (ör. bir mobil uygulama, farklı şirketlerimizden biri veya bir üçüncü taraf) topladığımız Bilgilerle birleştirebileceğimizi lütfen unutmayın (aşağıda daha ayrıntılı olarak açıklandığı gibi. Bazı Tekliflerimiz işletilmeyebilir. bizim tarafımızdan, ancak bir üçüncü taraf lisans sahibi veya uygulama mağazası tarafından; kişisel bilgilerinizin bu tür bir lisans sahibi veya uygulama mağazası tarafından işlenmesi bu Gizlilik Politikasına tabi değildir, bu nedenle lütfen ilgili hüküm ve koşulların şirketlerimizden birine atıfta bulunup bulunmadığını dikkatlice kontrol edin. ya da değil. TOPLAYABİLECEĞİMİZ BİLGİLER Aşağıdaki Bilgi kategorilerini toplar, kullanır, paylaşır ve başka şekilde işleriz: 1) Sizden toplayabileceğimiz bilgiler: Tekliflerimizden biri için bize kaydolduğunuzda veya kaydolduğunuzda sizinle ilgili bilgiler de dahil olmak üzere kayıt, hesap ve kayıt Bilgileri (örneğin, ad, kullanıcı adı, şifre, e-posta, iletişim bilgileri, doğum tarihi veya yaş, içerik vb.). İlgili ödeme bilgileri (örneğin, kredi kartı bilgileri) dahil olmak üzere bir Teklifi satın almanızla ilgili bilgiler. Ayrıca deneme süreleri, ödüllerin veya promosyonların kullanımı, aktif bir aboneliğin olmadığı süreler, ödeme geçmişi ve kaçırılan ödemeler hakkındaki Bilgileri de işleyebiliriz. Size gönderdiğimiz bir e-postayı açıp açmadığınız, bir Dijital Hizmetle (kullandığınız herhangi bir hesap dahil) nasıl etkileşimde bulunduğunuz, görüntülediğiniz veya yayınladığınız içerik, reklamlar dahil olmak üzere bir Teklifi kullanımınız veya bir Teklife katılımınız hakkında bilgiler etkileşimde bulunduğunuz, oynadığınız oyunlar ve ulaştığınız seviye, bir Dijital Hizmette bulunan çeşitli özellikler, programlar, hizmetler ve içeriklere yönelik tercihleriniz ve ilginiz ve bunların kullanımı. Bu aynı zamanda bir birey veya hane düzeyi de dahil olmak üzere demografik bilgileri içerebilir. Tüketici anketlerine, araştırma çalışmalarına veya odak grup testlerine katılırken, çevrimiçi veya yazılı yanıtlar ve uygun olduğunda sesli veya görüntülü görüşmelerinizin kaydı dahil olmak üzere sağladığınız bilgiler. Resimler, videolar ve metinler dahil olmak üzere promosyonlara, yarışmalara, ödül çekilişlerine veya harekete geçirici mesajlara girişler. Bazı Dijital Hizmetler için, cihazınızın kamerasına erişmek için izin istediğimiz yerler de dahil olmak üzere kamera erişimi. İzin verirseniz, uygulama deneyimi içinde fotoğraf veya video çekebilir, bunları bize gönderebilir veya belirli artırılmış gerçeklik ("AR") özelliklerine erişebilirsiniz. Bu özelliklerden bazıları, AR efektleri uygulamak için gözlerinizin ve diğer yüz özelliklerinizin veya yakın çevrenizin hareketlerini izlemek için kamera sistemlerine güvenebilir. Tekliflerimizden birinin parçası olarak Bilgi paylaşmayı seçtiğiniz veya anketlerimizden veya geri bildirim oturumlarımızdan biri sırasında Bilgi verdiğiniz durumlar dahil olmak üzere hassas veriler; veya etnik köken, dini veya felsefi inançlar, cinsel yaşam veya cinsel yönelim veya siyasi inançlarınız. Dinamik eğlence özellikleri içeren bazı Tekliflerde, izninizi alarak ve geçerli yasalara uygun olarak yüz tarama, göz izleme veya cilt yanıtı gibi biyometrik olarak kabul edilebilecek bilgileri toplayabiliriz. Üçüncü taraf topluluklardaki hayran sayfalarımız/kanallarımız/hesaplarımız, forumlar ve sosyal medya siteleri, hizmetler, eklentiler ve uygulamalar ("Sosyal Medya Siteleri") ile etkileşimleriniz dahil olmak üzere sosyal medya katılımınız hakkında bilgiler. Bu, gönderiler, 'beğenileriniz' ve sağlayabileceğiniz diğer kullanıcı tarafından oluşturulan içeriğin yanı sıra adınız, kullanıcı kimliğiniz, profil fotoğrafınız, doğum gününüz ve bize izin verdiğiniz yerlerde arkadaş listeleriniz gibi kendinizle ilgili ayrıntıları içerebilir. ve takip ettiğiniz kişiler. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinde gizlilik ayarlarınızı nasıl özelleştirebileceğiniz ve bu Sosyal Medya Sitelerinin kişisel bilgilerinizi ve içeriğinizi nasıl ele aldığı hakkında bilgi için lütfen gizlilik yardım kılavuzlarına, gizlilik politikalarına ve kullanım koşullarına bakın. Çevrimiçi forumlara katılırken nerede fotoğraf, mektup, video veya yorum paylaştığınız da dahil olmak üzere, herkese açık veya topluluk forumlarımızda paylaşılan bilgiler. Gizlilik ayarlarınıza bağlı olarak, bu Bilgi veya içerik ve kullanıcı adınız İnternette veya bir kullanıcı topluluğu içinde herkese açık hale gelebilir. Herkese açık bir forumda veya topluluk forumunda paylaştıktan sonra bu Bilginin daha fazla kullanılmasını engelleyemeyiz. Bilgilerinizi nasıl ele aldıkları hakkında daha fazla bilgi için lütfen belirli forumun gizlilik politikalarına bakın. Cihaz bilgilerinden (bir IP adresi veya ülke kodu gibi) türetildiği yerler de dahil olmak üzere konumunuzla ilgili bilgiler, cihazınızın Dijital Hizmetlerimizle etkileşimleri veya sizin izninizle, Cihazınızın kesin konumu hakkında bilgiler (örn. mobil cihazlar aracılığıyla coğrafi konum belirleme) ). Bir stant aracılığıyla veya başka bir şekilde tarafımızca veya bizim adımıza üçüncü bir tarafça çekilmiş görüntüler ve klipler dahil Etkinlik Bilgileri ve gıda alerjileri ve diğer bireysel gereksinimler gibi bir etkinliğin organizasyonu ve yönetimi ile ilgili diğer Bilgiler. Cihaz türü, tarayıcı, benzersiz cihaz tanımlayıcısı, işletim sistemi, internet sağlayıcısı, mobil cihaz tanımlayıcısı ve/veya mobil reklam tanımlayıcısı, bağlı cihaz tanımlayıcısı (bağlı bir televizyonunki dahil), IP adresi dahil olmak üzere cihazınızdan gelen teknik/kullanım bilgileri , ağ özellikleri, televizyon cihazı ve uygulama özellikleri ve ayarları ve diğer cihaz veya tarayıcı özellikleri ve ayarları. Müşteri yardım masalarımızdan biri, e-posta adresleri, müşteri hizmetleri sohbet kutuları, formlar veya bilet sistemleri, Sosyal Medya Siteleri ve aramaların kaydedilebileceği müşteri çağrı merkezleri aracılığıyla bizimle iletişime geçtiğinizde dahil olmak üzere müşteri sorgularınız hakkında bilgiler. 2) Arkadaşlar da dahil olmak üzere diğer kaynaklardan sizin hakkınızda toplayabileceğimiz bilgiler: Diğer kaynaklardan alınan bilgiler. Zaman zaman, Bilgileri, diğer web siteleri ve çevrimiçi reklamcılık ve medya ile etkileşimleriniz hakkındaki kullanım bilgileri de dahil olmak üzere aldığımız diğer çevrimiçi bilgilerle birleştiriyoruz. Ayrıca, bize demografi, işlem ve satın alma geçmişi gibi Bilgileri sağlayan üçüncü taraf veri sağlayıcıları da dahil olmak üzere, çeşitli diğer kaynaklardan veya dış kayıtlardan alınan Bilgileri Bilgilerle tamamlıyor veya birleştiriyoruz; Etkileşimde bulunduğunuz içerik ve reklamlarla ilgili bilgiler. Sizi Dijital Hizmetlerimizden herhangi biriyle etkileşime girmeye davet eden arkadaşlarınızdan da sizinle ilgili Bilgi alabiliriz. İçeriğimize veya hizmetlerimize erişimi içeren bir abonelik sözleşmeniz olan üçüncü taraflardan Bilgi alabiliriz. Arkadaşlardan bilgi. Belirli durumlarda, Tekliflerimizi kullanan arkadaşların sizinle ilgili Bilgi vermelerini sağlayabiliriz. Örneğin, biri sizi bir Teklife katılmaya davet etmek, uygulamalarımızdan biri aracılığıyla önerilerde bulunmak veya içerik paylaşmak ya da aynı oyun oturumunu birden fazla oyuncunun paylaşmasını sağlamak için web sitelerimizde Bilgi gönderebilir. Bu talepleri işleyerek, adınız, iletişim bilgileriniz veya Tekliflerimize olan ilginiz ve bunları kullanımınız hakkındaki bilgiler dahil olmak üzere Bilgilerinizi alabiliriz. BİLGİLERİ NASIL KULLANABİLİRİZ Bilgileri, bu Gizlilik Politikasında açıklanan amaçlar için veya toplama sırasında açıklanan amaçlar için kullanabiliriz. Aşağıda, çeşitli amaçlarımızı, daha fazla açıklama gerektirebileceğini düşündüğümüz herhangi bir işleme faaliyetini ve gerektiğinde Bilgilerinizi işlemek için dayandığımız 'yasal temeli' açıklıyoruz. Bilgilerin birden fazla amaç için işlenebileceğini lütfen unutmayın. (örneğin, Teklifimizi Sunarken elde ettiğimiz Bilgiler, Teklifimizi Geliştirmek ve Geliştirmek ve/veya Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık için de kullanılabilir), aşağıdaki amaçların veya işleme faaliyetlerinin tümü her durumda geçerli olmayacaktır. Bilgilerinizi özel kullanımımız, bize verdiğiniz izinler (örneğin, doğrudan pazarlama gibi belirli kullanımlara izin verip vermediğiniz) ve diğer kontroller dahil olmak üzere, etkileşimde bulunduğunuz Teklife ve bizimle etkileşim kurma şeklinize bağlı olacaktır. Bilgilerinizi işlememize ilişkin olarak egzersiz yaparsınız (örn. Bilgilerinizin işlendiği amaçlardan bazılarını kontrol etme beceriniz, aşağıdaki BİREYSEL HAK TALEPLERİ ve ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER bölümlerinde açıklanmıştır. ​ Tekliflerimizi Sunmak Bilgilerinizi, bizimle hesabınızı oluşturmak, sizi bir Teklife kaydettirmek, bunun için ödeme yapmanızı sağlamak, Teklifi sağlamak, bir promosyona, yarışmaya, ödül çekilişine veya bir çağrıya katılmanıza izin vermek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. UGC'yi göndermek veya Teklifi sürdürmek ve sorunları çözmek için eylem. Bu, geçerli hüküm ve koşulların uygulanmasını (örneğin, abonelik hizmetlerimiz, cihaz sayısıyla ilgili sınırlamalar ve konuma göre doğru içeriğin görüntülenmesi için) ve Teklifin, ona erişmek ve " abonelik hizmetlerimizde "izlemeye devam edin" özelliği.Bilgileri işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Tekliflerimizin sağlanması ve sürdürülmesi gibi işlemlerimizin çoğu, yeni müşterilerin kaydolmasını veya bize kaydolmasını ve mevcut müşterilerin oturum açmasını sağlamak da dahil olmak üzere, sizinle aramızdaki sözleşmenin akdedilmesi veya ifa edilmesi için gereklidir. Dijital Hizmetlerimizde. Bizim 'meşru çıkarlarımız' (ve diğerlerinin çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere diğer işleme türleri gereklidir: İşimizi yürütmek, Tekliflerimizi sunmak ve müşterilerimize hizmet etmek; Önemli bildirimler veya güncellemeler için müşterilerle iletişim kurmak; Müşterilerle işlemleri, satın almaları ve rekabeti hakkında iletişim kurmak kazanır; İçeriği kişiselleştirmek ve diğer içerikler için önerilerde bulunmak; Teklifin hüküm ve koşulları kapsamında bize verilen hakları kullanmak ve/veya uygulamak; Tekliflerimiz için ödeme kolaylığı. Diğer işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güvenebiliriz. Tekliflerimizi İyileştirme ve Geliştirme Bilgilerinizi, Tekliflerimizi ve bunları kullanımınızı analiz etmek, iyileştirmek, kişiselleştirmek ve değerlendirmek ve ayrıca yeni Teklifler geliştirmek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Bu, tüketici anketlerine verdiğiniz yanıtların analizini içerebilir. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: 'Meşru çıkarlarımız' (ve diğerlerinin çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gereklidir: Tekliflerimizi iyileştirmek ve geliştirmek. İşimizde verimlilik yaratmak. Müşteri içgörüleri, pazar araştırması ve içerik performansının ölçülmesi dahil olmak üzere tüketici eğilimlerini ve ilgi alanlarını anlamak. Tekliflerimizin kullanımıyla ilgili istatistikleri derlemek. Diğer işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güvenebiliriz. Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık Bilgilerinizi, bizim ve müşterilerimizin ve ortaklarımızın Tekliflerini pazarlamak ve/veya reklamını yapmak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Ayrıca, tekliflerimiz hakkında sizinle iletişim kurmak ve Sosyal Medya Siteleri de dahil olmak üzere müşterilerimizin ve ortaklarımızın teklifleri hakkında sizi bilgilendirmek için 'segmentler' gibi kullanıcı grupları veya kategorileri oluşturmak için kullanıcılar hakkında bilgi toplayabiliriz. Bilgilerinizin bu amaçla işlenmesi, ilginizi çekmesi amaçlanan reklamları otomatik olarak seçen bir algoritmayı içerebilirken, sizin açık rızanız olmadan veya sizin üzerinizde yasal veya önemli bir etkisi olabilecek tam otomatik kararlar almayız veya geçerli yasaların izin verdiği durumlarda. UGC'yi, Teklifin ilgili hüküm ve koşullarına tabi olarak pazarlama veya reklam amacıyla da kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği n ülkede, aşağıdakilere güveniyoruz: Gönderdiğiniz UGC'yi kullanmak için Teklifin hüküm ve koşulları altında bize verilen haklara ve sizinle yaptığımız sözleşmenin yerine getirilmesine güveneceğiz. Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık için diğer işleme türleri, aşağıdakiler dahil olmak üzere meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için gereklidir: Bağlamsal (veri odaklı olmayan) reklamcılık, analitik ve reklam performansının ölçülmesi dahil olmak üzere Tekliflerimizi pazarlayarak ve reklamını yaparak ticari çıkarlarımızı geliştirmek; Mevcut müşterilerle ilişkileri derinleştirerek ve yeni müşteriler geliştirerek müşteri tabanımızı genişletmek; Gönderdiğiniz UGC'yi kullanarak (sizinle bir sözleşmenin ifası için gerekli olmadıkça veya onayınızı isteyemedikçe); ve, Markamızı hem çevrimiçi hem de çevrimdışı olarak tanıtmak. Belirli yargı alanlarında, ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık veya e-posta, kısa mesaj veya SMS yoluyla doğrudan pazarlama iletişimleri, Sosyal Medya Sitelerindeki mesajlar gibi belirli işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güveniriz. Müşteri Hizmetlerinin Sağlanması Bilgilerinizi, bizimle telefon, e-posta, sohbet kutuları, formlar veya bilet hizmetleri, mektup, web sitesi veya bir Sosyal Medya aracılığıyla iletişim kursanız da, sorularınız ve şikayetlerinizle (sorun giderme dahil) ilgilenmek de dahil olmak üzere Müşteri Hizmetleri sağlamak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Alan. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Bir Teklif sağlamak için sizinle olan sözleşmemizi yerine getirmemiz için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gerekli olacaktır: Müşterilerimizin soru ve şikayetlerine yanıt vermek; Yanıtımızın ilerlemesini ve etkinliğini takip etmek; ve Müşteri Hizmetlerimizi Geliştirmek. Suç ve diğer yasa dışı faaliyetleri tespit etmek, önlemek ve soruşturmak Bilgilerinizi suç faaliyetlerini (dolandırıcılık ve telif hakkı ihlali dahil) tespit etmek, önlemek veya araştırmak, kullanıcı güvenliğini korumak ve mahkemelerde medeni haklarımızı uygulamak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Örneğin, gerektiğinde Bilgilerinizi kanun uygulayıcı kurumlarla paylaşabilir veya haklarımızı uygulamak için size karşı yasal işlem başlatmak için kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gerekli olacaktır: Ticari çıkarlarımızı ve haklarımızı, gizliliğimizi, güvenliğimizi ve mülkiyetimizi veya müşterilerimizin ve kullanıcılarımızın haklarını korumak; Yasal talepler oluşturmak, uygulamak veya savunmak; Mevcut çareleri takip etmemize veya maruz kalabileceğimiz zararı sınırlamamıza izin vermek için Bilgilerinizi üçüncü taraflarla paylaşmak. Yasal yükümlülüklere uyum Bilgilerinizi muhasebe kuralları da dahil olmak üzere yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak, Bireysel Hak Taleplerine yanıt vermek ve düzenleyiciler, adli makamlar ve kolluk kuvvetleri veya devlet organlarından gelen taleplere yanıt vermek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Bu tür faaliyetler yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için gereklidir. BİLGİ PAYLAŞIMI VE AÇIKLAMA Bilgileri aşağıda belirtilen amaçlarla aşağıdaki taraflarla paylaşır ve ifşa ederiz: Şirketler grubumuz bünyesinde Şirketlerimiz, işlerini yürütmek için birbirlerini destekler ve etkileşime girer. Sonuç olarak, şirketlerimiz bu Gizlilik Politikasında belirtilen amaçlar doğrultusunda, bunu yapmak için yasal bir dayanak olması ve vermiş olduğunuz izinlerle tutarlı olması halinde (örn. pazarlama iletişimleri) ve aşağıdaki KİŞİSEL HAK TALEPLERİ ve ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER bölümlerinde açıklandığı gibi, Bilgilerinizin işlenmesiyle ilgili olarak uyguladığınız diğer kontroller (örneğin, belirli işlemlerden vazgeçmeyi seçtiğiniz durumlarda). Grup şirketlerimiz dışında Üçüncü Taraf Hizmet Sağlayıcıları. Temsilcilerimiz ve yüklenicilerimiz, Tekliflerimizin yerine getirilmesi, oluşturulması, bakımı, barındırılması ve sunulması, pazarlama yapılması, BT hizmetleri ve güvenlik sağlanması gibi ancak bunlarla sınırlı olmamak üzere, bizim için gerçekleştirdikleri hizmetleri gerçekleştirmeye yardımcı olacak Bilgilere erişime sahiptir. , ödemeleri, e-posta ve siparişleri yerine getirme, promosyonları, yarışmaları ve ödül çekilişlerini yönetme, araştırma, ölçüm ve analitik yürütme, içgörü türetme veya müşteri hizmetleri. Bağlantılı Üçüncü Taraf Sosyal Medya Siteleri. Dijital Hizmetlerimizden bazıları, müşteri etkileşimi ve pazarlama amacıyla Sosyal Medya Siteleri dahil olmak üzere diğer sitelere bağlantılar içerebilir. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinin bilgi uygulamaları bizimkinden farklı olabilir, bu nedenle bu üçüncü taraflara gönderilen veya onlar tarafından toplanan kişisel bilgiler üzerinde hiçbir kontrolümüz olmadığından, kişisel bilgilerinizi göndermeden önce gizlilik politikalarına ve koşullarına bakmalısınız. Üçüncü Taraf Ortaklar. Belirlenen üçüncü taraflarca sponsor olunan veya ortak markalı Dijital Hizmetler ve Çevrimdışı Hizmetler sunabiliriz. Bu ilişkiler sayesinde üçüncü şahıslar, faaliyet sırasında sizden kişisel bilgiler toplar veya elde eder. Bu üçüncü tarafların kişisel bilgilerini kullanmasını kontrol etmiyoruz. Veri uygulamaları hakkında bilgi edinmek için gizlilik politikalarını okumanızı öneririz. AdTech Sağlayıcıları. Belirli Bilgileri üçüncü taraflarla (örneğin diğer şirketler, perakendeciler, araştırma kuruluşları, reklamcılar, reklam ajansları, reklam ağları ve platformları, katılımcı veri tabanları, yayıncılar ve kar amacı gütmeyen kuruluşlar) genel olarak karma veya kimliksizleştirilmiş biçimde işlemek üzere paylaşabiliriz. , ilgi alanlarınıza dayalı olarak size reklam sağlamak için. Diğer üçüncü şahıslar. Bir işlem veya yeniden yapılanma gibi işin (veya işin bir bölümünün) kontrolünde olası bir değişiklik olması durumunda, Bilgilerinizi yeni bir iş sahibi de dahil olmak üzere ilgili taraflarla ve ilgili profesyonel danışmanlarıyla paylaşabiliriz. Kolluk kuvvetleri, makamlar ve mahkemeler. Bilgileri, cezai faaliyetlerin önlenmesi, soruşturulması veya kovuşturulması için gerekli olduğunda ve ayrıca yasal sürece yanıt olarak, örneğin bir mahkeme emrine veya mahkeme celbine yanıt olarak veya bir düzenleyici, hükümet yetkilisi veya kolluk kuvvetinin talebine yanıt olarak ifşa ederiz. . Herkese açık forumlar. Dijital Hizmetlerimizden biriyle etkileşimde bulunurken veya bir Sosyal Medya Sitesi aracılığıyla Bilgi gönderir veya paylaşırsanız, hizmetin niteliğine veya gizlilik ayarlarınıza bağlı olarak bu Bilgiler herkese açık hale gelebilir, bundan sonra, daha fazla kullanılmasını veya paylaşılmasını engelleyemeyiz. bu bilgi. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinde gizlilik ayarlarınızı nasıl özelleştirebileceğiniz hakkında bilgi için lütfen onların gizlilik yardım kılavuzlarına ve kullanım koşullarına bakın. VERİ SAKLAMA Geniş anlamda, Bilgilerinizi yalnızca bu Gizlilik Politikasında açıklanan amaçlar için gerekli olduğu sürece saklayacağız. Bu, saklama sürelerinin Bilginin türüne ve Bilgileri ilk etapta toplama nedenimize göre değişeceği anlamına gelir. Örneğin, Tekliflerimizin size sunulmasıyla ilgili bazı Bilgiler, finans ve vergiyle ilgili çeşitli yasal yükümlülüklere uymak için birkaç yıl boyunca saklanacaktır. Yasal yükümlülüklerimize ve Bilgileri saklamak için ticari bir ihtiyaç olup olmadığına bağlı olarak, farklı Bilgi kategorileri için çeşitli saklama sürelerini belirleyen ayrıntılı dahili saklama politikalarımız bulunmaktadır. Bir saklama süresi sona erdikten sonra, yasal iddiaların oluşturulması, uygulanması veya savunulması için gerekli olmadıkça, Bilgiler güvenli bir şekilde silinir. Geçerli saklama süreleri hakkında daha fazla bilgi için aşağıda belirtilen iletişim yöntemlerini kullanarak bizimle iletişime geçmelisiniz. BİREYSEL HAK TALEPLERİ Belirli koşullar altında, aşağıdaki taleplerden bir veya daha fazlasını yerine getirmemizi isteme hakkınız vardır. Bunu yapmadan önce sizden kimlik kanıtı veya diğer ek bilgileri isteyebiliriz. Erişim ve düzeltme hakkı: Bilgilerinizin bir kopyası ile birlikte elimizde bulunan Bilgilerin ayrıntılarını ve Bilgilerinizdeki hataların düzeltilmesini talep edebilirsiniz. Silme hakkı ("unutulma hakkı"): Belirli durumlarda Bilgilerinizin silinmesini isteme hakkı. Belirli durumlarda, özellikle bu Bilgileri saklamak için yasal bir yükümlülüğümüz olduğunda (örn. düzenleyici raporlama amaçları için) veya örneğin size sağlamaya devam etmemizi istediğiniz durumlarda, bazı Bilgi türlerini silemeyebiliriz. bir Teklifle ve Bilgilerin işlenmesi, o Teklifin sağlanması için gereklidir. Pazarlama iletişimi ve üçüncü taraflarla paylaşım. Size, bizden belirli pazarlama iletişimleri alma ve doğrudan pazarlama amaçları için güvenilir ortaklarla Bilgi paylaşımımıza ilişkin tercihlerinizi ifade etme fırsatı sunuyoruz. Daha fazla bilgi için lütfen aşağıdaki "Reklam Seçenekleri" bölümüne bakın. Taşınabilirlik hakkı: Bazı durumlarda Bilgilerinizi dijital formatta alma veya doğrudan başka bir kontrolöre iletme hakkı (teknik olarak mümkün olduğunda). İtiraz hakkı: (özel durumunuzla ilgili gerekçelerle) Bilgilerinizin doğrudan pazarlama amaçları da dahil olmak üzere meşru menfaatlerimiz temelinde işlenmesine itiraz etme hakkı. Rızayı geri çekme hakkı: Bir rızaya dayalı olarak herhangi bir Bilginin işlenmesiyle ilgili olarak rızanızı istediğiniz zaman geri çekebilirsiniz. Bu hakları kullanma talebini duruma göre değerlendireceğiz. Geçerli veri koruma mevzuatında sağlanan ilgili muafiyetler nedeniyle yasal olarak bir talebe uymak zorunda olmadığımız durumlar olabilir. Bazı durumlarda bu, onayınızı geri çekseniz bile Bilgilerinizi saklayabileceğimiz anlamına gelebilir. Bu hakları kullanmak veya Veri Koruma Görevlimizle iletişime geçmek için lütfen bireysel haklar talep portalımız aracılığıyla bir talep gönderin. ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER Dijital Hizmetlerimizi ziyaret ettiğinizde, biz, üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcılar ve ortaklar, (i) Dijital Hizmetlerimizi sağlamak, geliştirmek, sürdürmek, kişiselleştirmek, korumak ve iyileştirmek ve içerikleri (ii) Dijital Hizmetlerimizin kullanımını ve performansını ve bunlar üzerinde görüntülenen veya onlar tarafından veya onlar aracılığıyla sunulan herhangi bir reklamı analiz etmek ve raporlamak dahil olmak üzere analizler gerçekleştirir (iii) dolandırıcılık ve diğer yasa dışı faaliyetlere karşı koruma, tanımlama ve önleme (iv) Kullanıcılarımızın grupları veya kategorileri (reklam hedef kitleleri dahil) hakkında toplu veriler oluşturmak ve (v) bizim için, ortaklarımız ve üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcılar için Tekliflerimiz veya tekliflerimizle ilgili reklamları sunmak, hedeflemek, teklif etmek, pazarlamak veya kişiselleştirmek için müşterilerimiz ve ortaklarımız (bir reklamı ne sıklıkta göreceğinizi sınırlama dahil). Çerez Açıklaması Web Sitesi Tercihleri Detaylar Gerekli çerezler Bu çerezler, temel web sitesi işlevselliğini etkinleştirmek için gereklidir Kesinlikle gerekli çerezler veya benzer teknolojiler: Dijital Hizmetlerimizde dolaşabilmenizi ve güvenli alanlara erişim gibi özelliklerini kullanabilmenizi sağlamak için gereklidirler. Bu tanımlama bilgilerini devre dışı bırakırsanız, Dijital Hizmetlerin bazı veya tüm özellikleri çalışmayabilir. Performans çerezleri Bu çerezler, performansı ölçebilmemiz ve iyileştirebilmemiz için Dijital Hizmetlerimizin kullanımını analiz etmemize olanak tanır. Performans çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Trafiği analiz edebilmemiz, kullanıcıların etkileşimlerini anlayabilmemiz ve ilgili Dijital Hizmeti iyileştirebilmemiz için Dijital Hizmetlerimizi nasıl kullandığınız hakkında bilgi toplarlar. E-postalarımız ve haber bültenlerimiz, size gönderdiklerimizle nasıl etkileşim kurduğunuzu bize bildiren bir 'web pikseli' içerebilir. Oyunlar için bu teknolojiler, başarılarınız, özelliklerin kullanımı ve diğer oyun içi etkinlikler dahil olmak üzere oyununuz hakkında bilgi toplar. Bu amaçla kendi çerezlerini veya benzer teknolojilerini kullanabilen üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcıları kullanabiliriz. İşlevsellik çerezleri İşlevsellik çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Bunlar, Dijital Hizmetlerimizin yaptığınız seçimleri (kullanıcı adınız veya bulunduğunuz bölge gibi) hatırlamasını ve kişiselleştirilmiş içerik dahil olmak üzere gelişmiş, daha kişiselleştirilmiş özellikler sunmasını sağlar. Ayrıca, video izlemek veya bir bloga yorum yapmak gibi istediğiniz Dijital Hizmetleri sağlamak için de kullanılabilirler. Reklam çerezleri Bu çerezler, reklam şirketleri tarafından ilgi alanlarınızla alakalı reklamlar sunmak için kullanılır. Sosyal medya çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Bunlar, Dijital Hizmetlerimiz aracılığıyla bir sosyal medya paylaşım düğmesi veya 'beğen' düğmesi kullanarak Bilgi paylaştığınızda veya Facebook veya Twitter gibi bir Sosyal Medya Sitesinde veya aracılığıyla hesabınızı bağladığınızda veya içeriğimizle etkileşim kurduğunuzda kullanılır. Sosyal Medya Sitesi, bunu yaptığınızı kaydedecektir ve bu Bilgi, özel hedef kitleler oluşturmak da dahil olmak üzere, hedefleme/reklamcılık faaliyetleriyle bağlantılı olabilir. Reklam çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Dijital Hizmetlerimizden bazıları, hedeflenen reklamları sunmak için bir üçüncü taraf reklam ağını veya başka şirketlerimizi kullanabilir. Ayrıca Dijital Hizmetlerimizde ve Sosyal Medya Sitelerimizde göz atmanızı veya kullanımınızı takip etme yeteneğine de sahip olabilirler. Pazarlama iletişimi. Size, bizden belirli pazarlama iletişimleri almaya ilişkin tercihlerinizi ifade etme fırsatı sağlayabiliriz. Bu tercihleri güncellemek isterseniz, (i) ayarlarınızı düzenlemek için (özelliğin mevcut olduğu durumlarda) bizimle oluşturmuş olabileceğiniz bir hesaba giriş yapabilirsiniz. Aldığınız herhangi bir pazarlama e-postasında verilen 'abonelikten çıkma' talimatlarını da takip edebilirsiniz. Reklam seçenekleri. Kendi başımıza veya bağlı kuruluşlar veya üçüncü taraflarla birlikte çalışarak, zaman içinde Dijital Hizmetlerimizde ve İnternet üzerindeki üçüncü taraf web sitelerinde ve uygulamalarda reklamlar sunabilir ve veri toplama, raporlama, reklam yanıtı ölçümü ve site analizi ile meşgul olabiliriz. Biz, bağlı şirketlerimiz veya üçüncü taraflar, bu faaliyeti gerçekleştirmek için çerezler, web işaretçileri, pikseller, SDK'lar veya benzer teknolojiler kullanabiliriz. İlgi alanlarınızla daha alakalı reklamlar sunmaya yardımcı olmak için kullandığınız uygulamalar, ziyaret ettiğiniz web siteleri ve zaman içinde cihazlarınız ve tarayıcılarınız ile web siteleri, hizmetler ve uygulamalar hakkında diğer bilgileri alırlar. Dijital Hizmetler ve cihazlarınız ve tarayıcılarınız arasında. Bu tür reklamlara 'ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık' denir. Biz, bağlı şirketlerimiz veya üçüncü taraflar bu bilgileri, ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık ve araştırma, analiz, dahili operasyonlar, dolandırıcılığı önleme ve tüketici deneyimlerini geliştirme gibi diğer amaçlar için farklı tarayıcılarınızı ve cihazlarınızı ilişkilendirmek için de kullanabiliriz. Tercihlerinizi kendi rıza yönetimi platformumuz aracılığıyla yönetmenin yanı sıra, masaüstü veya mobil tarayıcınızda ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık hakkında daha fazla bilgi almak ve özdenetim programlarına katılan üçüncü taraflarca yapılan bu tür reklamlardan vazgeçmek için_cc781905- adresini ziyaret edin. 5cde-3194-bb3b-136bad5cf58d_ Çevrimiçi Seçenekleriniz if , the Avrupa Etkileşimli Dijital Reklamcılık İttifakı tarafından barındırılan AEA'da _cc-7891945-5 (EDAA); if in Avustralya'dan Avustralya Reklam Birliği'ne (ADAA); ve Kanada'da ise, the Kanada Dijital Reklamcılık İttifakına (DAAC). Kanada'daki mobil uygulamalarda ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık hakkında daha fazla bilgi edinmek ve DAAC'ın AppChoices programına katılan üçüncü tarafların bu tür reklamlarından vazgeçmek için lütfen DAAC araçları sayfasını ziyaret edin _cc781905-5cde Cihazınız için AppChoices sürümünü indirmek için -3194-bb3b-136bad5cf58d_ . Bu programlar aracılığıyla uyguladığınız herhangi bir devre dışı bırakma seçeneğinin, seçtiğiniz üçüncü şahıslar tarafından ilgi alanına dayalı reklamlar için geçerli olacağını, ancak yine de araştırma, analitik ve dahili operasyonlar dahil olmak üzere diğer amaçlar için Bilgi toplanmasına izin vereceğini unutmayın. Bu nedenle reklam almaya devam edebilirsiniz, ancak bu reklam ilgi alanlarınızla daha az alakalı olabilir. Mobil cihazınıza ve işletim sisteminize bağlı olarak daha fazla seçeneğiniz olabilir. Örneğin, çoğu cihaz işletim sistemi (örneğin, Apple telefonlar için iOS, Android cihazlar için Android ve Microsoft cihazlar için Windows), uyarlanmış uygulama içi reklamların yayınlanmasının nasıl sınırlandırılacağı veya önleneceği konusunda kendi talimatlarını sağlar. Bu özellikler ve bunların özel uygulama içi reklamlara nasıl uygulanacağı hakkında daha fazla bilgi edinmek için ilgili işletim sistemlerinin destek materyallerini ve/veya gizlilik ayarlarını inceleyebilirsiniz. Kesin konum bilgisi. Mobil uygulamalarımız aracılığıyla mobil cihazınızdan kesin konum bilgilerinin toplanmasını etkinleştirmek veya devre dışı bırakmak için mobil cihaz ayarlarınıza erişebilir ve bu toplamayı sınırlandırmayı seçebilirsiniz. ULUSLARARASI TRANSFERLER Uluslararası olarak faaliyet gösteriyoruz ve Bilgilerinizi kullanımımızla ilgili bazı süreçler, Bilgilerinizin yasal koruma düzeyinin farklı olabileceği ülkeler de dahil olmak üzere, Bilgilerinizin bulunduğunuz ülke dışındaki ülkelerde saklanmasını veya işlenmesini gerektirecektir ve bununla ilgili olarak daha az yasal hakka sahip olabileceğiniz durumlarda. Bilgileriniz özellikle, bazı sistemlerimizin bulunduğu Amerika Birleşik Devletleri'ne aktarılabilir ve burada işlenebilir. Ancak, Bilgilerinizi bir ülke veya bölge dışına her aktardığımızda, geçerli yasal gerekliliklere uymak için gerekli adımları attığımızdan emin olacağız. Bu nedenle, gerektiğinde, uygun sözleşme mekanizmalarını kullanarak veya Bağlayıcı Şirket Kurallarının kabulü de dahil olmak üzere onaylanmış bir uluslararası veri aktarım mekanizmasına katılan hizmet sağlayıcılara güvenerek uygun korumaların uygulanmasını sağlayacağız. GÜNCELLEMELERLE İLGİLİ BİLDİRİM Zaman zaman bu Gizlilik Politikasını güncelleyebiliriz. Sitelerimize bir bildirim yerleştirerek herhangi bir önemli değişiklik hakkında sizi bilgilendireceğiz. Güncel olmanız için bu politikayı periyodik olarak kontrol etmenizi ve gözden geçirmenizi öneririz. ŞİKAYETLER Sorgunuzu nasıl ele aldığımızdan memnun değilseniz, Veri Koruma Yetkilinize şikayette bulunma hakkınız olabilir. Bu Gizlilik Politikası en son 31 Temmuz 2022 tarihinde güncellenmiştir. © Turkuaz Bay Topluluğu. Tüm hakları Saklıdır. Top

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    Things To Do > 39 Steps Casinos Eating Out Golf Luxury Hotels Rock Climbing Beaches Clubs Fishing Hiking Markets Water Sports Boat Trips Cycling Trails Fruit Picking Horse Riding Painting Classes Zipline Bowling Diving Go Karting Jeep Safari Quad Bike Things To Do > 39 Steps to a memorable experience Step Image Become a Foodie Catch your supper Climb to a castle Discover history Dive for treasure Drink with the local Drive thru the mountains Eat at a banquet Enjoy the lakeside Feed the Wild Donkeys Fly like a kite Gamble for fun Get to know Shakespeare Go under ground Haggle at markets Have fun in the water Hike thru the hills Hit the night life Marvel at history Pamper yourself silly Pay your respects Play championship golf Pray in an Abbey Relax and unwind Ride like the wind Sample the Lion's Milk Search thru a graveyard See things in focus Shop till you drop Soak up the sun Stay at a vineyard Style a new haircut Take in a boat trip Trek thru the Park Unleash the throttle Visit a theatre Walk through a ghost town Watch evolution Wet yourself with excitement Top Things To Do > Beaches Alagadi Beach, Kyrenia Alagadi Beach in Kyrenia consists of gorgeous wild flowers and soft clean sand. Nature photographers are guaranteed great shots of the white flowers growing there which are a protected species, so be careful. as there are big fines for picking them. If you want to see marine turtles this is definitely the place.The beach provides nesting for sea turtles, which is why it’s closed to visitors at night. But if you look up the Alagadi Sea Turtle Conservation and Research Centre , you may be able to join one of the groups that get to observe nesting. Golden Beach, Dipkarpaz Located on the Karpass Peninsula is beautiful Golden Beach at Dipkarpaz. The town is an eco-tourism centre, known for its historic architecture and the wild donkeys that still live there. Nearby, Apostolos Andreas Monastery is a popular pilgrimage destination as well as a haven for art and history lovers. Golden Beach provides opportunities to sunbathe and recharge but lacks shade, so pack plenty of sun-tan lotion. The water is crystal-clear, the sand a beautiful golden brown and restaurants nearby offer simple but delicious meals. Glapsides Beach, Famagusta A perfect choice for families. The sea is warm and very clear, with shallow water for kids to play in. It offers comfort and safety, and the gorgeous views complete the experience. You can enjoy local cafes or hire parasols and sunbeds or, if you prefer something livelier, Famagusta offers a wide range of bars, restaurants, organised nature tours, museums, and casinos. Between the relaxing beach and vibrant city nightlife, Glapsides is a popular choice for couples and honeymooners. ​ Escape Beach, Kyrenia Perfect if you love water sports and want to enjoy jet skiing, pedal boating, canoeing, volleyball, banana boats or scuba diving. The beach is very clean with lots of amenities, including showers available in restaurants, and the water is shallow with tiny waves. It’s very popular but somehow rarely overcrowded, with lawns next to the beach for comfortable lounging, and plenty of shade. Don’t miss out on the local clubbing scene either, as this is one of the hottest locations on the island, with a memorable vibe. ​ Silver Beach, Famagusta Crystal-clear water makes this beach a favourite for snorkelling. It’s wide, with plenty of space to spread out and enjoy the sand and fresh air, allowing you to explore the sea daffodils and other marine life uninterrupted. For adults, the water is only thigh-high for a long way in, so parents can relax and let their little ones get acquainted with the sea at their own pace. Sunbeds are available and there are restaurants nearby. ​ Acapulco Beach, Kyrenia Connected to a hotel and spa complex, non-guests pay for sunbeds, changing rooms and showers. Acapulco Beach is noted for extremely clean sand, water sports, tennis and golf. The nightlife is excellent as well. An interesting option is the Neolithic settlement of Vrysi on the eastern part of the beach, where you can visit the excavation site. ​ Agios Filon Beach, Dipkarpaz Another gorgeous beach for marine turtles, with scenic rocks you can climb if you’re in the mood for adventure. The beach is also close to one of the finest historical sites Northern Cyprus has to offer. Agion Filon (also known as Ayios Philon), is home to both a 5th-century and a 12th-century church. The newer church was built partly over the remains of the older one. You can see beautiful tiled floors, a hallmark of Byzantine architecture, as well as apses and parts of the roof. ​ Palm Beach, Famagusta A really unusual seaside location. Popular among locals, it has fine golden sand and the water is warm and clean. There’s a hotel there but just beyond the edges of the beach, you’ll find a string of dilapidated hotels, and further south, barbed-wire military fence. This is Varosha, the ghost town of North Cyprus. It’s not open to the public but you can see many abandoned buildings around the fenced-off area. In the 1970s, Varosha was an international tourist spot, attracting celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor, Brigitte Bardot, and Richard Burton but in the political turmoil that split Cyprus, it was abandoned. A strange monument to the past, there are plans to reopen it. Top Things To Do > Boat Trips Vela Yachting Daily boat trip from Kyrenia to enjoy spectacular scenery, brilliant service and freedom to explore the coastline. There’s no better way to experience the taste of elegance and style than on board a well-arranged luxury yacht such as the Vela. They do day or sunset trips where you’ll feel the privilege of a limited number of guests and enjoy exquisite Mediterranean buffet of lunch and fruits. Day Trip with lunch and fruits 10:30 to 16:30. Sunset trip with dinner and fruits 18:30 to 22:30. ​ Cyprus Active A boat trip is a fun and enjoyable day out for all ages. The Kyrenia Harbour boat trip involves swimming, snorkelling, sunbathing and a Cypriot meze lunch along the picturesque Northern Coast. ​ Musa If you’re looking for a relaxing day out around Girne, book a boat trip with Musa. He’s had a trip advisor Certificate of Excellence for 5 years and is in their Hall of Fame. He’s also mentioned in the Lonely Planet tour book. You can book as a boat trip, dedicated fishing charter, or private trip with an opportunity to swim in the warm crystal waters along the coast. The boat drops anchor in areas usually busy with a variety of fish to swim among. ​ Scuba Cyprus Boat Trips Scuba Cyprus is a family run business, that offers quality services at affordable prices. The scuba Cyprus gullet situated in Kyrenia harbour is a traditional Cyprus built boat with twin engines. The boat is available on daily boat trips or for tailor made private hire trips. ​ Blue Bird Boat Tours Blue Bird Boat Tours offer a range of boat trips from the harbour in Kyrenia and travel along the coast, serving lunch along the way. A relaxing peaceful trip, Captain Bayram and his crew let you enjoy a wonderful trip out with our Traditional Turkish gullet. Lunch or dinner cooked by the Paptain, his famous fish and chicken and a range of homemade fresh mezes, finished off with fresh fruit. Blue Bird caters for daily tours, sunset trips, short trips, private trips or special occasions. ​ Happy Sea Yacht Tours Family operated company. See their Facebook page. Sailor and Civil Engineer University and sailing courses Turkish German English Professional tour guide ​ Sabrina Boat Tours Day and sunset trips for quiet times or parties. Good food Nice crew Nice boat Jumping off the boat into the sea What more can you ask for? See their Facebook page. ​ Go North Cyprus Take to the water to explore the coastline in a traditional wooden boat. Relax with a gentle swim, a delicious Mediterranean lunch and a snooze in the sun or get the adrenaline pumping with water sports. Relaxing cruise on traditional wooden boat Swim in clear sea direct from the boat Delicious grilled lunch with meze included Snorkel and meet the local marine life Optional sports including parasailing Professional, fun, English speaking guide Go North Cyprus will collect you from your hotel in Kyrenia, Nicosia or Famagusta. At the harbour, board your traditional wooden boat moored alongside fishing boats and pleasure craft. Watch the captain ease out into the sparkling sea beyond heading west in the direction of Escape Beach (most of the time) or east towards Acapulco Beach, depending on weather conditions. Your Captain knows all the best places to swim, so he’ll drop anchor at the very best. Enjoy a swim in the sea direct from the boat, or bring your own mask and snorkel. Freshly-cooked lunch is onboard, with a choice of grilled fish or chicken served with traditional meze selection. After lunch, snooze and sunbathe or sign up for jet skis, banana boating, or paragliding. There’s often time for an extra dip before you head back to Kyrenia. Get your camera out for some great selfies on board and lots of photos of Kyrenia and its landmarks from out at sea. The team will take you back to your hotel in Nicosia, Famagusta or Kyrenia. Departure time is between 09:00 am and 10:00 am. Duration is 8 hours. Top Things To Do > Bowling Great during the day or evening, bowling is something thr whole family can enjoy and is excellent value. As well as the bowling lanes, downstairs in The Kings Centre in Kyrenia is an arcade equipped with small kids rides as well as arcade games, pool tables, etc. You purchase a card topped up with as little or as much as you like to credit the machines and you can win tokens on many rides and games that can be exchanged for goodies. Lots of fun for all ages, individuals and groups. Food also available, reasonably priced food and drinks. Burgers, Pizzas, kids menu.... ​ No need to book, can just turn up and have fun or you can book for groups and parties. Definitely an ideal place on any given day no matter what time of year. Highly recommend. Top Things To Do > Casinos The casino scene in Northern Cyprus has really taken off in recent years attracting tourists and serious players alike. By day you can drive through spectacular mountain scenery then gamble the night away if you want. Casinos here have become a serious alternative for high rollers. People who went to Las Vegas, Macau or Monte Carlo now prefer our relaxing Mediterranean location and it's little surprise. Island wide casinos offer all the games punters are looking for including poker, blackjack, roulette, craps, punto banco, baccarat and all their variations. North Cyprus is a destination of the World Poker Tour (WPT) drawing thousands of Texas and Omaha aces and there are several guaranteed prize tournaments held throughout the year. Even if you don't like gambling, the Hotel and Casino resorts offer a host of other amenities. Deluxe accommodation, spa and wellbeing centres, fine dining, beach clubs, spectacular stage shows, piano or jazz bars, pubs, cocktail roof bars and discos are all normal. Casino resorts like to go big and they draw international artists suchas Turkish pop megastar Tarkan , Swedish Iranian singer and judge of Persia’s Got Talent, Arash , world renowned flamenco and salsa group Gipsy Kings , even American socialite and DJ Paris Hilton ​. Hotel & Casino resorts combine luxury, elegance, indulgence and excitement but they're all walk in - you don't have to be staying at the associated resort to go in and play . If you are a high roller expect ultimate comfort and pleasure suchas private jets, king suites, Gurkha Royal Courtesan cigars to mention just a few. North Cyprus boasts more than 20 casinos. Most of them are located in Kyrenia, with some also in Famagusta and Nicosia and most ask men to wear a suit and tie and ladies to wear formal dress for the gaming rooms. Smart casual is usually accepted for the slots area but Jeans or sport shoes are not normally allowed. * One final request. Please gamble responsibly within the limits of your own budget,and take regular breaks if playing for extended periods of time. The Colony Lords Palace Elexus Merit Crystal Cove Rocks Hotel Linak Deluxe Cratos Premium Merit Crystal Cove Merit Royal Kaya Palazzo COncorde Merit Park Kaya Artemis Acapulco Top Things To Do > Clubs You’ll probably be pleased to know there’s plenty of nightlife in Northern Cyprus to keep you occupied. Northern Cyprus is as peaceful and tranquil as you want it to be, but once in a while it’s nice to know you’re not far from entertainment like dancing, singing or just listening to some good music within a disco atmosphere. Concept parties, stage performers, live PA’s, light shows, fireworks’ displays, and sublime cocktails can be expected in a ‘normal’ night. All venues have security, and anti-social behaviour is not tolerated. Northern Cyprus prefers calm and cool, and ladies on their own have nothing to be nervous about their surroundings. Dress codes are important, smart casual is always a must for men, and most venues don't allow groups of guys only. “If you prefer style and lavish head to the North, if you prefer chavish go to Ayia Napa!” If you’re after a cosier atmosphere, roof bars and beach bars offer a calmer and stylish ambiance with DJs, live music, jazz or latin popular in smaller concept venues. BTW, clubs and discos are most definitely clubs and discos in Northern Cyprus. Night clubs are something different where ladies of the night earn a living. Just so you know! ​ Open Air Clubs Often located in or next to hotels or beach clubs. One of the most popular is Escape Beach Club in Alsancak, and is well known for fantastic international DJ nights and having a fun party twist. Escape has a well-stocked bar and heaps of room to dance around, allowing you to have a memorable night out!. Escape is open really only for the main summer months but it’s definitely one of the best clubs on the island, North or South. Other clubs around the same area of Alsancak and Lapta are Sunset Beach and Camelot . ​ Club Nightpark in the heart of Kyrenia and next to the main car park area, is one of the best clubbing hotspots at weekends. Again they have DJ slots and play heaps of up-to-date club music. They even carry on in the winter-tim,e with DJs travelling from all over to put on some excellent party nights. Others are stalwarts for DJ sets and club music nights, such as Club Acapulco which is located within the Acapulco Resort itself, and even some of the hotels have some good nightspots like the Zeta Club at the Jasmine Court Hotel. Slightly further east, you also have the Mansion Club which has been opened by the Malpas Hotel, with a beachfront location and chilled out décor and decent DJs. In Famagusta, you have Lions Gardens , which is a huge complex offering more than just a club venue. It carries on throughout the year with international DJ sets, and it finds a wide variety of excuses to hold various parties! Some of the bigger hotels such as the Salamis Conti and Bilfer Palm Beach, also have their own disco facilities. To get in to any clubs in Northern Cyprus, you have to be aged 18 or over and should carry some ID with you if you think you look younger. Lads do have to pay to get into some of the clubs, whereas girls often get in for free. Taxis are always around, and the clubs should look after you by calling one if you require, but bear in mind that there are also water taxi services to take people back to Kyrenia. Top Things To Do > Cycling Trails With perfect weather conditions, varied and challenging terrain, and beautiful scenery, Northern Cyprus is a firm favourite for leisurely and competitive cycling, all year round. Enthusiasts love the island’s rugged character, which can go from rocky to clay, and steep to flat, within the space of 10km. Whether venturing out on your own or following one of the myriad of routes, the roads ahead unfold across scenic urban, rural, mountainous and coastal terrain, with plenty to discover along the way. You'll find all manner of sights including streams, forests, quaint villages, the natural, the cultural and the historical, and it's easy to end up somewhere delightfully unexpected. ​ Biking Holidays Biking holidays are becoming more and more popular and many travel agents offer these. A typical itinerary would be something like this: DAY 1 - Start in Famagusta DAY 2 - Famagusta by bike DAY 3 - Famagusta - Salamis - Bogaz DAY 4 - Cross Karpaz peninsula to Karpaz Gate Marina DAY 5 - North coast then inland to Dipkarpaz DAY 6 - Through Karpaz National Park - Cape Andreas DAY 7 - Cycle then drive to Kyrenia via Kantara DAY 8 - Trip ends Kyrenia This tour would cycle 177km over 5days (an average of 35km per day), but you could extend that by a further 70km if you wish. Bike is typically a 21 gear mountain bike with front suspension, water bottle holder and facility to fit your own pedals or saddle if you wish . Spare parts and maintenance would be taken care of. All you'd need to bring is your own head gear. ​ Biking Trails Extensive biking trails span from the west to to Karpaz. Along these trails, you'll find agricultural fields, pine forests and carob and olive orchards in the Akdeniz Protected Area. The trails in these areas are mostly flat and smooth dirt roads among the fields, and sandy and rocky trails along the coastline. The Kyrenia Mountain Range offers a wide variety of trails at different levels of difficulty. There are two fairly flat roads which provide alternatives for the more difficult dirt roads with many ups and downs. The trails are mostly through Pine forests, along the North and South facing slopes with views over the Mediterranean Sea and Mesaoria Plain . The mountain range extends into the Karpaz Peninsula and the trails become less steep here and reach the famous Apostolos Andreas Monastery near the tip of the Island. The network is comprised of 580 km of trails covering the Northern part of the island. Boards with maps and information about the area are installed at most of the trail heads, and all trails are marked with white and green signs to make them easier to follow. The trails are all connected to each other and intertwine, allowing you to choose the best path for you and completely personalise your biking experience. ​ Top Trails Alevkaya Bellapais-Buffavento Restaurant Buffavento Castle Catalkoy to Besparmak Karmi to St Hilarion Karsiyaka to Lapta Kyrenia Muntains to Alevkaya Lapta Coastal Walkway Top Things To Do > Diving Northern Cyprus has one of the longest diving seasons in the Med, with crystal clear waters giving visibility up to 30m and the most exciting reef formations. The warm water around North Cyprus attracts marine life from the Red Sea, via the Suez Canal, and gets washed in by the gentle currents. You’ll find an unbelievable variety of fish such as Stingrays, Grouper, Scorpion, Amberjacks and Wrasse. Coral and sponges grow in abundance and among the rocks lurk eel and octopus. It’s also a major breeding ground of Green and Loggerhead Turtle, so this is one of the few places where divers can swim with turtles. There’s more than 20 unique diving sites east and west of Kyrenia as well as diving safaris to other places along the coast or to the south of the island. You can try scuba diving for the first time; take a basic PADI course; or go for one of the speciality courses available. Private groups and families are catered for and dry suits ensure dives won’t be spoiled if the water temperature falls below comfortable. Equipment available to rent or buy: Regulators, BCD's, Masks, Fins, Snorkels, Dry/wet suits, Boots, Gloves. Services available by qualified technicians : Servicing, Repairs, Hydrostatic Tank Testing, Air Fills. ​ PADI , The world's largest diver training organisation has authorised centres in Northern Cyprus offering: Try Dive and Bubble Makers - First underwater experience for children 8+. Discover Scuba Diving - 1st step diver education. Min age: 10 Open Water Diver Course - Entry-level. Trains to be qualified to dive anywhere to a maximum depth of 18 meters. Advanced Open Water Dive r - Extension of the Open water Course. Qualifies diving to a maximum of 30 meters. Emergency First Response (EFR) - CPR & First Aid. Recognised by UK HSE and can be used in the work place. EFR Instructor - Qualifies you to teach CPR and first aid. Rescue Diver Course - Teaches to organise and assist in a diving emergency and how to administer oxygen. Divemaster Course - Leadership training and professional membership of PADI. Assistant Instructor Course - Preparation for Open Water Scuba Instructor training. Instructor - Qualifies you to teach and certify PADI Scuba programmes, enrol on speciality courses or start a new business. IDC Staff Instructor - Prepares you to shape the next generation of PADI Professionals. Some of the Speciality Courses available in Northern Cyprus: Boat Diving Underwater Navigation Deep Diving Underwater Naturalist Fish ID Wreck Diving Multilevel Diving Equipment Specialist Night Diving Digital Underwater Photography Nitrox Emergency Oxygen Provider Underwater Naturalist Underwater Navigation Example of a dive site – Plane Wreck 500m north of a beach close to Esentepe sits a lonely rock known as DOMUZ TASI, and 100m to the east of that lies the wreck of a WW2 twin-engine bomber. Originally thought to be a WELLINGTON, RAF Hendon has suggested that it could be a BRISTOL BEAUFORT or BEAUFIGHTER. In 1944 a squadron of Wellingtons was based in Malta, then superseded by Beaufighters, which required less crew. Photos are being studied by the RAF museum at Hendon and the Imperial War Museum to provide a positive ID. The dive boat is boarded from a beach, and 5 minutes later you’ll be anchoring close to engine number 1 of the plane. Generally, visibility is very good (in excess of 20m). There’s usually a westerly current, which varies in strength depending on wind direction. Water temperatures vary from 27° in summer to about 15° in winter. The seabed is mostly Neptune grass with sandy gully areas dotted around. Engine number 1 lies in 12.5m of water and engine number 2 in 14m. Moving south-west from engine number 1 for about 20m brings you to the machine gun and electrical generator, and what looks like an air intake for the engine. This is home to a large Octopus, so no further exploration has been done so as to not disturb this guest. North from there you’ll find the engine oil coolers, then north-west to a depth of 23m you’ll find the fuselage in a sandy gulley. Northeast from there, the cockpit section containing throttles, dials and engine controls also comes into view. Up to now, this site has been dived relatively few times, and each dive seems to produce a new piece of wreckage with, it's hoped, much more to find. Because of the size of the area it’s very easy to become immersed in discovery, so it’s very important to monitor air supply. Example of a dive site - Power Station The Power station is about 1.5 miles north of the large power plant west of Kyrenia. The setting is exposed, so checking the weather forecast beforehand is a must. This is a large site and usually warrants two dives to cover the whole complex of rock formation. Unlike a classic reef structure, this site reminds you of three large pyramid rock structures, with other large boulders and rocks scattered about. The tops of the rocks are at 9 metres and extend down to 30-34m. As you enter the water, drop down to 9 metres and fin to the north end of the site. The bare rocks are pitted with indentations full of marine life. Around the rock you’ll see striped groupers, moray eels, amberjacks, stingrays, sea breams, parrotfish and large schools of mackerel, especially in September and October. On the sandy bottom, at around 30m, you’ll find rocks covered by colourful sponges filled with soldier fish. At the end of the site where the grass begins, there’s a large cave at 31m. The wide entrance and interior of the cave is decorated with a variety of colourful sponges, lobsters and small marine life. You’ll also see black-spotted nudibranch on the sponges. Moving to the outer edges of the site, you’ll start to see the predominant Neptune grass. You can slowly ascend along the rock surfaces and enjoy the rich marine activity of this dive site. You’ll never tire of this dive site. It’s a little off the beaten track so the marine life is secure and abundant in their isolation. ​ Example of a dive site - Zenobia Around 2:30am on 7 June 1980, the Zenobia capsized and sank in Larnaca Bay, 1500 meters from the shore, at a depth of roughly 42m/138ft, taking her estimated £200 million worth of cargo with her. There were no casualties in the disaster. The wreck is consistently ranked as one of the top 10 recreational dive sites worldwide. As a dive site, Zenobia provides a wide range of challenges, from a fairly simple dive to 16m depth along the starboard side of the ship, to a more advanced dive inside the upper car deck and accommodation block, right up to extremely adventurous dives within the lower car deck or the engine room, which are only suitable for very experienced divers. Day trips to the Zenobia dive site can be organised from Northern Cyprus. Departing around 6.20am and arriving back about 3:30pm, the trip includes two dives and a BBQ lunch. Other Dive Sites Ancient Wreck – the ship sank in this area more than two thousand years old. The wreck was discovered in 1965 and restored by underwater archeologists. The remains of the 15m long vessel lie at a depth of 24m. Diving here is for the history, rather than for marine life. Location: Kyrenia Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: sand Requirements: BSAC Sports Diver, PADI Advanced Open Water ​ Bambi – this is a shallow (14m) and easy dive, ideal for beginners. It's a more or less flat area and can be a good location for night dives. Divers can admire a beautiful 150m long reef, large boulders, colourful fish and other marine organisms. Even turtles can be seen in this area. Location: Kyrenia Type of dive: shore dive Sea bed: sand Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water ​ Fred – this site offers beautiful coral formations, but the real attractions here are the friendly fish such as groupers, breams and triggerfish, waiting for food that divers bring (boiled eggs, bread). The depth ranges from 13m to 29m. Location: Girne Type of dive: shore/boat dive Sea bed: rock Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water ​ Karpaz Wreck – the wreck lies at a maximum depth of 16m. Divers can also admire picturesque scenery with colourful sponges and abundant marine life. There is a wide cave at a depth of 28m in this area. Location: Karpaz Peninsula Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: sand Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water ​ Paradise – this is a deep and excellent dive. With a depth ranging from 24m to 43m it's a diving paradise. Reef, walls, holes, canyons and abundant marine life. Location: Sunset Beach (Kyrenia) Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: rock Requirements: BSAC Sports Diver, PADI Advanced Open Water ​ Pinocchio – the scenery here is very picturesque, with boulders and rock formations, colourful sea slugs and abundant fish species. The average depth is 20m. Location: Sunset Beach (Kyrenia) Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: rock Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water Diver ​ Zephyros – the main attractions are large reef systems, unique rock formations and old anchors. Maximum depth is 32m but there is also much to see at 20m. This dive site is good both for beginners and advanced divers. Location: Sunset Beach (Kyrenia) Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: rock Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water ​ Zeyko – Main attraction is a beautiful reef and some magnificent rock formations (walls, holes). Colourful sponges, corals and fish species make this dive a good choice. The depth ranges from 12m to 40m. Location: Kyrenia harbour Type of dive: boat dive Sea bed: rock Requirements: BSAC Ocean Diver, PADI Open Water ​ Northern Cyprus Diving Centres Amphora Dive Centre North Cyprus British Scuba Centre Scuba Cyprus Dive Hub Blue Dolphin Top Things To Do > Eating Out Top Things To Do > Fishing Offshore fishing is available at either Sunrise or Sunset and you should allow up to 5 hours for the trip. All fishing tackle, safety equipment and refreshments are usually supplied, and catches include Albacore Tuna, Bluefin Tuna, Skipjack Tuna, Bonito, Mediterranean Spearfish and Dorado. Private trips can be arranged and fishing is year round with catch depending on season. ​ Friend Ship North Cyprus Ex 737 pilot Captain Bekir Kasapoglu operates this 29’ boat, powered by twin 115 HP Mercury engines. Accommodates up to 8 and features a toilet, kitchen, fridge, multi-media system, & tons of seating. GPS and Fish Finder help locate targets & the live well keeps bait fresh. Beginners, pros, or families are all welcome. The warm Mediterranean waters are home to plenty of delicious Tuna including Skipjack, Dogtooth, and Bluefin. You’ll also have your shot at Grouper, Barracuda, and Mahi Mahi. Capt. Bekir brings all the gear you need, as well are lures and fishing licenses. Snacks and drinks are provided so you can fully relax and enjoy your time. At the end of the trip, he’s happy to clean and fillet any catch you choose to keep. For a truly unique experience, choose a trip that includes a visit to Capt. Bekir’s restaurant, where you’ll prepare and enjoy your fresh catch in an authentic environment. Friend Ship North Cyprus really is a trip to remember! North Cyprus Fishing A 33’ Dawson flybridge operated by Australian Captain Dennis Davut , whose spent decades fishing there and in Cyprus. Accommodates 8; has twin 300 HP Cummins with a top speed of 30 knots; GPS; fish finder; A/C; cabin with kitchen; plenty of seating; private toilet; beds; quality Penn and Shimano fishing gear; fighting chair; tuna tubes to keep your bait fresh; and outriggers to extend your reach. On half day excursions, expect Jacks, Common Pandora, Barracuda and Yellowtail. Full day excursions expect Swordfish, Tuna, Dusky Grouper, Mahi Mahi, and Spearfish. Children 8+ welcome. Life jackets provided for everyone. Most Popular Features: Live Bait, You Keep Catch, Drinks, Toilet, Child Friendly, Air Conditioning, Ice Box, Rods, Reels & Tackle, Fighting Chair, Food (Lunch & Snacks). Targeted species: Amberjack, Barracuda (Great), Common Pandora, Dolphin (Mahi Mahi). Fishing techniques: Light Tackle, Heavy Tackle, Bottom Fishing, Trolling, Jigging, Popping, Deep Sea. Trip includes: Rods, Reels, Tackle, Penn & Shimano, Live Bait, Lures, Snacks, Drinks, First Mate, Lunch. ​ Cyprus Offshore Fishing Captain Barbaros Özkaptan operates from Kyrenia Hrbour with a 44’ Wellcraft boat with a top speed of up to 30 knots, thanks to twin Volvo engines, she can take up to 8 anglers. Professional navigational and safety gear on board; tuna tubes; outriggers; downriggers; fighting chair; A/C; toilet; shower; kitchen; beds; wheelchair accessible; multimedia system and a TV. Note that smoking on board is not allowed. Head north for Tuna, Swordfish, Grouper, Marlin, and whatever else crosses your path, and get ready for some jigging, trolling, deep dropping, and more. Charter covers all fishing gear including spearfishing equipment, as well as licenses, food, drinks, and catch cleaning. Just bring your lucky rod if you have one and an adventurous spirit! Most Popular Features: Fishing License, Live Bait, Catch Cleaning & Filleting, Drinks, Toilet, A/C, Ice Box, Rods, Reels & Tackle, Fighting Chair, Food (Lunch & Snacks). Captain Barbaros Özkaptan is a passionate fisherman with over 15 years fishing experience, including international offshore fishing tournaments. He specialises in putting his customers on top of the hottest bite that local waters can offer, and loves sharing his knowledge with his guests. Targeted species: Amberjack, Great Barracuda, Dolphin (Mahi Mahi), Dusky Grouper. Types of fishing: Offshore Fishing Fishing techniques: Trolling, Spinning, Jigging, Popping, Drift Fishing, Deep Sea Fishing Trip includes: Rods, Reels & Tackle, Live Bait, Lures, Catch Cleaning & Filleting, Snacks, Drinks, First Mate, Fishing License, Lunch, Fly Fishing Equipment ​ Fishing With Ladyboss Captain Ozgur Gokasan , with his decades of experience, will make sure you have an incredible time fishing with him. You’ll spend the day on a 34’ custom built Turkish wooden boat that accommodates 6, has a 185 HP Perkins engine, and with her fishfinder, you’ll have your lines wet before you know it. Capt. Ozgur knows where the fish are and will get you trolling for Mahi Mahi, Bonito, and Tuna. This is a great opportunity for the whole family to get involved with fishing. Kids over 12 will love this rare opportunity to fish offshore. Fishing With Ladyboss fully supports sustainable fishing, so once you’ve caught more than you could possibly eat, they’ll ask you to catch and release the rest of your haul. Let the crew know which restaurant you’ll be taking your fish to. Sandwiches, snacks, and soft drinks are provided. If you fancy a stronger drink, you’re welcome to BYO. You’ll use Penn rods and reels, with Rapala lures. No live bait is used. Most Popular Features: License, You Keep Catch, Catch Cleaning & Filleting, Drinks, Toilet, Child Friendly, Ice Box, Food (Snacks). Ozgur Gokasan has been fishing his whole life and running charters for 20 years. He’s fished all over the world, from Turkey to South Africa to Florida. He loves targeting Tuba as it’s exciting to catch. Targeted species: Bonito, Dolphin (Mahi Mahi), Albacore Tuna, Skipjack Tuna. Fishing techniques: Trolling Trip includes: Catch cleaning & filleting, Snacks, Drinks, First Mate, Fishing License. ​ Kn Fishing Stores Trips KN Fishing Stores are retailers of fishing tackle equipment in Larnaca and Nicosia. Captain Constantinos combines selling fishing tackle with knowledge of fishing to provide a team of passionate fishermen. The 18’ Aquamar boat is located at Larnaca Marina. accommodates 4 and is powered by twin 90 HP Suzuki engines with a maximum speed of 25 knots. Along with necessary navigational and safety equipment, the boat also features a live bait tank, ice box, tuna tubes, and downriggers. You’ll explore nearshore and offshore fishing spots, targeting a variety of fish species, such as Mahi Mahi, Barracuda, Snapper, Grouper, Amberjack, and Tuna. You can keep the catch after the trip, so pick a restaurant where you want to take the catch and have it prepared. Taking a trip with a crew that runs a tackle shop has its perks. They’ll provide tip-top equipment, so you’ll know you’re using the best quality gear. You only need to purchase your fishing license and prepare some snacks and drinks for the day. Enjoy this unusual day at Cyprus and catch some tasty fish on the way! ​ SEAze The Day – Larnaca Captains Panayiotis, Andreas, and Nicolas are brothers who share the same passion for life on the ocean. They’re locals with years of experience in fishing and diving, know every corner of this island, the best fishing spots it has to offer and launch from 5 different marinas. From Larnaca Bay you can expect deeper, sandy waters with multiple reefs and target giant Amberjack, Grouper, Dentex, Pargus, and more. There’s a limit of 3 kilos of fish that you can keep, so make sure the ones you take taste great. The captain will clean and fillet your catch for you. Once you get back to the marina, he’ll recommend a great local restaurant where you can have your fish prepared in a traditional way. “Arkalos,” is an 18’ inflatable DiveRib boat. She can accommodate up to 4 guests and can take you to the fishing spots very quickly and comfortably. This high-speed boat can reach a maximum speed of 40 knots and reach offshore spots within 30 minutes. Snorkelling equipment is also available free of charge. If you’re interested in using it, just make sure to mention it in advance, so everything can be prepared in time. Fishing adventures with SEAze The Day are available year-round. Top Things To Do > Fruit Picking Top Things To Do > Go Karting For anyone used to European go-karting tracks full of scruffy piles of tyres and less than glamorous facilities, North Cyprus go-karting tracks will come as a very pleasant surprise. Go-karting is for young and old, ages 7 to 70, and gives you the thrills of motor-racing without the need for Formula 1 major sponsorship deals. The single engine karts zip around at speeds of up to 90kmp, and being close to the ground, hug the corners far more effectively than a normal car. It’s as much about skill as speed, as any F1 fan will tell you, so youngsters can enjoy trying their go-karting driving skills in a safe and well-monitored environment. So, when the beaches have warmed you to perfection, and you feel the need for speed, here’s where to go karting: ​ Zet Karting There can be few go-karting tracks that are set in a botanical garden, but the Zet Karting track is one such facility. The Zet Karting circuit was built to meet international standards as laid down by the go-karting governing bodies, the CIK and FIA. Safety barriers are erected for maximum protection for drivers as well as spectators with fire extinguisher placed at strategic places for safety precautions and a fully equipped First Aid room in line with International Safety regulations. This family-run go-karting centre is suitable for both first-time drivers and experienced go-karters, thanks to its excellent design and range of facilities. It’s no surprise to discover that the family who built the centre really love their karting; their father raced saloon cars in Britain before the family moved to North Cyprus. It soon became apparent that the family’s love of karting was outgrowing the streets and bus garages where they raced, so they clubbed together to set up the island’s proper karting circuit. The Zet Karting circuit is 1200 metres long and 7 metres wide, and you can race in one of five different track modes; from 300 metres to 1200 metres. You can even race at night thanks to a very efficient floodlighting system. There are two kinds of karts available; the 120cc single engine karts for those aged 7 to 14, which can reach speeds of 40kmp, and the 270cc single engine karts for adults, which can reach speeds of 90kmp. The kids will love zipping around the 300-metre circuit, specially designed with them in mind. The central control tower keeps a computer record of very lap time and speed, so you can analyse your performance after each race, and plan how to race better next time. The centre also has a bar and cafeteria, and in a typically North Cyprus touch, a barbeque serving local dishes as well as international ones. The fully airconditioned Bar is open for special occasions, such as Theme Nights and Birthday parties.You can also take professional karting lessons here and even race Remote Controlled cars if you prefer not to be in the driving seat. ​ Cemsa Karting Located in North Nicosia. and 5 minutes away from the city centre, the 1650m outdoor circuit is designed to CIK/FIA standards and open 7 days a week. They also offer a wide range of services to companies and institutions, from small organizations to large tournaments. With the timing system, you can compare your scores at the end of the race with those of your friends and improve yourself. If you want, you can continue this sport with professional go-karts accompanied by trainers, participate in championships and develop your own career. Don't forget that even master Formula 1 drivers are trained in Karting. Maxmile Power Go Karting If you're thinking about where to go except pool and sea, call out your friends and meet at Max Mile Go Karting in Famagusta. Wear your flat cap and choose your go kart one by one then get ready to a cut throat competition! Max Mile Power Go Karting invite you to Famagusta to have a great, fun karting competition! In the last thirty years, karting has evolved from a simple weekend pastime, to a nationally organized competitive form of motor sport. Yet a great deal of the original appeal of karting remains today. Karts are still the most inexpensive way to enjoy the thrills and excitement of motor racing. Whether you're looking for family fun or downright serious competition, the versatility of karting provides it all. Karting is fun, competitive and challenging. The first look at a kart is usually deceptive. It's hard to take anything so small seriously, yet closer scrutiny reveals that whilst a kart is simple in construction, it is quite sophisticated in design and theory. Top Things To Do > Golf Korineum Golf and Beach Resort The first golf hotel in North Cyprus, set in beautiful countryside, surrounded by umbrella pines and olive trees, between the impressive Five Finger Mountains and the sparkling waters of the Mediterranean, Korineum is the perfect vacation resort for golf, spa and dining experiences in Northern Cyprus. If you’re looking for a golf break away from the hustle and bustle of city life, then it’s a perfect location. High standards of accommodation, beautifully decorated and furnished rooms, an attractive outdoor pool and sumptuous spa facilities. These impressive amenities are everything you would expect from a top-class resort complex. ​ ​ Golfers will be delighted at the immaculately kept course and excellent practice facilities. Spreading over 6,232 meters this par 72 gem is designed for golfers of all ages and standards. Enjoy mountain and sea views from every hole, making for a breath-taking experience. The paspallum playing surface is maintained in excellent condition all year round, and with strategically placed bunkers and water hazards players face a true challenge. Five tees at each hole gives players of all abilities the opportunity to enjoy their round. Buggies are available, allowing play to be more relaxing but also giving players a chance to absorb the stunning natural beauty of the surrounding area. The beautifully manicured lawns and impeccably kept golf course are not the only marvels of the Resort. With a private beach and a deluxe Boutique Hotel, the experience offered is one of Celebrated Relaxation. The dramatic beauty of the Resort is sure to take your breath away with its stately grandeur. The landscape is carved from a natural forest of Umbrella Pines, Carob and Olive trees and will ease you into the steady beat of island life. If you’re picturing blue skies, acres of green, a delightful drink and a good book, then you’re envisaging Korineum. Top Things To Do > Hiking Self-Guided Hiking Tour This is a must-do day trip if you're in the Kyrenia area and have some extra time! The hike is not long (4.5 miles), but it’s all above 2,000 feet so, while it’s challenging, it’s also one of the best day trips which can be tailor made to suit your requirements. ​ What's Included Bottled water Air-conditioned vehicle Hiking shoes or hiking boots Walking poles Your guide will meet you at your hotel in Kyrenia the evening before your hike, to finalise details and ensure all your questions are answered. Pick up can also be arranged from Nicosia, Larnaca, Bafra and Limassol hotels, The hike begins above the village, passing through a young pine underwood. Gorgeous views over the shore and the Mesaoria plain will please your eye until the walk ends in the small village of Kantara, where you can enjoy a break and some cold refreshments at the Kantara Restaurant. The walk then continues as an undulating track to the Crusader Castle of Kantara. The enormous castle rises 650m above sea level at the beginning of the Karpaz peninsula. On a clear day, you can spot Cape Zafer, Türkiye, in the distance. ​ 7-day Hiking Trip Kyrenia to Kyrenia Adventure is calling you for a seven-day hiking trip that’ll have you experiencing this incredible region like many never do. Discover beaches, forests and villages on foot around the Kyrenia Mountains, a breath-taking range along the northern coast that’s still mostly a cherished local secret. Travel Style: Active - made for outdoor types. Service Level: Standard - Comfortable tourist-class accommodations with character; mix of public and private transport. Physical Rating: 3 - Average. Trip Type: Small Group - Maximum 16, Average 12. Age requirement: 12+. Under18s must be accompanied by an adult. Itinerary Day 1 In the evening, meet your fellow travellers and choose whether to head out for dinner with the group. Day 2 Discover Kyrenia on today's walks through the Old Town, Kyrenia Castle and the nearby town of Lapta. Visit Kyrenia's ancient harbourfront and stroll the seaside. Meals included: Breakfast Day 3 Travel east to the village of Esentepe, where few tourists visit and the local way of life moves at its own pace. With scenic trails through forested areas, enjoy a guided walk that ends at Antiphonitis Church, built as a monastery in the 12th century. Meals included: Breakfast Day 4 Visit Incircli Cave, the largest in Cyprus, rich with folklore and intricate rock formations. Continue to Kantara Castle, the first of two Crusader castle ruins to explore. Take a scenic walk down to the beach and enjoy free time for a swim. Meals included: Breakfast Day 5 Climb up to the ruins of St Hilarion Castle, a majestic maze of stone walls with a very famous lookout point. It's said that Walt Disney took inspiration for one of his fairy-tale castles here. Continue to Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus. Wander the Old Town and see the striking Selimiye Mosque and Arab Ahmet quarter. Visit a bakery and observe how traditional foods, such as lahmacun (dough topped with minced meat) and olive breads are made. Meals included: Breakfast & Lunch Day 6 Visit the ruins of Soli, one of the ten ancient kingdoms of Cyprus. Walk the steps of its Roman amphitheatre and admire its beautiful floor mosaics, dating back to the 6th century. Continue to the village of Lefke by hiking through a fertile valley filled with citrus trees. Meals included: Breakfast Day 7 Depart at any time. Meals included: Breakfast Top Things To Do > Horse Riding There are many beautiful ways to see Northern Cyprus, but what better way than to do it on horseback ? Seasoned rider or novice, you can take a trek with various organisations in a relaxed and safe environment. Horse riding and pony trekking in Northern Cyprus has been a popular pastime for hundreds of years, with families keeping horses as part of the family for travelling and pulling agricultural machinery. Today, horses are kept for trekking, showing and competition. Several riding clubs have flourished, and you can now find regular competitions across Northern Cyprus. Facilities are modern, up to date, and animals are well loved and cared for. Most riding clubs offer riding lessons within the club grounds, catering for beginners to advanced level, in spacious paddocks with jumping arenas. They’ll provide all the necessary head gear and advise you on how to go about getting into the saddle comfortably and safely. One of the nicest ways to travel on horseback in North Cyprus is by going on a hack, which can take you on really beautiful routes in the mountains. Here, you’ll take in views across the island, as well as ride past historical churches and other monuments. ​ Hacks can be group or private, and guides will know the best and safest ways to navigate routes, as well as the less well-trodden tracks and paths. Depending on where you'd like to ride, there’s several clubs. More central and heading towards Lefkosa, is Besok Riding Club . They also have an animal farm for kids to enjoy. A little further along in Balıkesır is Yusuf Efendi Ciftliği , a long-established riding centre whose family has kept horses for 3 generations. In Famagusta area, you’ll find the Royal Riding Club , not far from the sea. This is a very active riding club comprising all ages, which regularly holds its own competitions as well as competing in wider events. Last, is the wonderful Ranch , located west of Kyrenia, in Karsiyaka. Promoted also as a Petting Farm, the place buzzes with activity, from ducklings to donkeys. A very popular place for local residents and holidaymakers. Top Things To Do > Jeep Safari A fun and exciting jeep adventure, exploring the Kyrenia Mountain range of North Cyprus. Discover an abandoned tank, deserted monasteries and some of the most spectacular views North Cyprus has to offer and make sure you bring your camera! ​ We can’t promise you lions, tigers and bears, but we can promise you a great day out. A fun and safe off-road 4x4 adventure takes you on a scenic tour of the Kyrenia mountain range. Experienced and knowledgeable drivers will take you on an adventurous, yet safe, trip into the hidden heart of Northern Cyprus. Jeep Safari is a friendly, informative, cultural and fun experience, suitable for all the family, with amazing views and hidden places. A truly adventurous and exciting experience not to be missed! ​​ INCLUDES Pick up and drop off at hotel Off road 4X4 Jeep Safari adventure Refreshing breezes and a cooler temperature in the mountains Visits to a deserted village, a memorial tank, forgotten churches and abandoned monasteries Breathtaking views Spectacular scenery Nature & wildlife Cypriot lunch at a rural beach restaurant AVAILABLE Tuesday to Sunday DURATION 0930 to 1530 Check when booking if swimming costumes are needed, as during the hotter months it includes a beach stop. During peak season, June - September, book early to avoid disappointment. Top Things To Do > Luxury Hotels Top Things To Do > Markets Northern Cyprus's farmer markets are unique in their long history, and they also have a rather strange work schedule. Many years ago, local farmers had a tradition of taking their products to the surrounding cities for sale, and this tradition still exists today. The market begins on Wednesday in Girne, then moves to Famagusta on Thursday, Iskele on Friday, and Lefkosha on Saturday and Sunday. The market opens at 10:00 a.m. and closes at 16:00-18:00 p.m. There, you'll find a wide variety of fruits and vegetables grown by local farmers, as well as spices, nuts, and candies. Pay close attention to the sellers of fresh local fish and seafood. You'll also find authentic Turkish coffee in a variety of grinds and varieties. Also, you can find clothing, bedding, and even carpets at a very attractive price. A great tip, beginning from 16:00, vegetable and fruit sellers offer huge discounts on their fruits and vegetables. However, starting from 16:00, all other goods are likely to be packed or transported to another city. ​ Lambousa Market The Chateau Lambousa Saturday Market is a must to visit whether you're visiting North Cyprus for a short time or you spend your life here. It offers a cheerful atmosphere where locals trade with one another. You are sure to find someting you might like among the range of goods available at this market. Antiques, clothes, books, plants, jewelry and many more. The market is open from dawn till noon every Saturday. Early birds get the worm! go there early before all the good ones are taken. The market is situated behind the Chateau Lambousa hotel in Lapta, Kyrenia. Top Things To Do > Painting Classes Explore the world of Art ​ Island Studio provides an environment for children and adults to explore the world of art. It’s led the way inbuilding quality art lessons for art lovers or first timers. Classes are to learn, socialise, have fun, relax or be as creative as you can be. Previous classes include acrylic painting, life modelling, still life painting and drawing, marbling paper, watercolour techniques, and drawing with soft pastels and charcoal. Newer classes are oil painting and glass painting, with many more to come. If you’d like to join a class, all you need to do is to show up. Island Studio provides all necessary materials to accommodate you in the art class. It also provides painting parties with a minimum of 4 persons to a maximum of 8 people. Painting parties are usually held on Fridays from 6:30 to 8:30. Art classes are held on Saturdays from 10:00 to 12:00. Private lessons are avaiable upon request. Island Studio is located in Ozankoy, Kyrenia. Also check out Art Gallery Cyprus . Top Things To Do > Quad Bikes Cyprus is a very popular destination and thousands visit every year to relax on the beach and get some sunshine. Quad bike safaris are a great way to spice up your holiday by getting some excitement in a controlled and safe environment. This activity is suitable for all ages and is a great way to explore beyond the beach as they take you into the interior of this beautiful island. 2-Hour Village Tour About the trek: First is a demonstration of how to operate and safely ride your quad bike, then you’ll be given all relevant safety equipment. You’ll start on flat tarmac, progress to dirt tracks, then be led off through the traditional villages of Voroklini, Kellia, Troulli and Pyla which is located on the buffer zone. On tour, you‘ll experience the untamed countryside in a way you’ve never seen before, covering over 50km of terrain through mountain trails, farm treks and country roads, with stunning views and scenery. Trained staff will guide you on a 2+ hour awe-inspiring trip with 2 stops for resting. Continue through the hidden beauty and magnificent picturesque Cyprus which can only be achieved by a self-driven quad bike. Tours can also be tailored to ensure groups of all ages an experience of their own adventure! ​ Half-Day Village Tour About the trek: ​Turn your stay in ​Cyprus into an adventure that you’ll not soon forget. See some of the most incredible scenery seen by very few. The ​Half-Day Village Tour take​s​ you through ​beautiful villages​, areas with mountain and sea views. During uour ride you’ll have 3 stops for resting and lunch in a traditional Cypriot tavern. Join the hundreds of satisfied first timers and repeater customers who chose Quad Bike tours with confidence. Fun and excitement is guaranteed for singles, couples and families. This half-day tour includes safety briefing​​. Top Things To Do > Rock Climbing Garga Suyu Rock climbing is a sport in which participants climb up or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls. Named after the nearby spring ‘Garga Suyu ’, the massive rock outcrop on the Kyrenia to Buffavento main road, is the birthplace of rock climbing in North Cyprus. The climbing area has 15 climbing routes which lead up the rugged cliff, parallel to an impressive cave on the rock face. With a 5-minute easy approach from the main road, this climbing area attracts a small but growing group of rock-climbing enthusiasts. Getting ready for a climb, Görkem ties a ‘figure 8 knot’ to secure his harness to the climbing rope while Sertunç is watching. Bolt is a point of protection permanently installed in a hole drilled into the rock, to which a metal hanger is attached, having a hole for a carabiner or ring. Görkem is the lead climbing, while Sertunç is belaying on the ground. Görkem is collecting the express sets (carabiner pairs) on his way down the route, after clipping the rope through the top anchor point. Physically connected to each other by the rope, the climber and the belayer connect in mind as well. Communication and trust between them is necessary for a safe and comfortable climb. Outdoor Artificial Climbing Wall Members of the Nature Sports Club in the Middle Eastern Technical University can test their skills on a difficult route on the outdoor artificial climbing wall. The 11-meter-high climbing wall offers numerous difficulty levels. Wall climbing is used as training for climbing on natural rock formations with most beginners introduced to climbing via an artificial climbing wall. Learning particular techniques and special moves are necessary to be able to ascend up routes with higher difficulty levels. ​ Artificial Rock Walls Rock climbing can also be practiced on artificial rock walls, as well as on natural rock formations. The aim of rock-climbing is to safely reach an endpoint through a pre-defined route using ropes. In top-roping, an anchor is set up at the summit of a route, before the start of a climb. Rope is run through the anchor; one end attaches to the climber and the other to the belayer, who keeps the rope taut during the climb, and prevents long falls. This type of climbing is widely regarded as the safest type of climbing, with the lowest chance of injury. Rock climbing is a physically and mentally demanding sport requiring strength, endurance, agility and balance and mental control. It can be a dangerous sport, and knowledge of proper climbing techniques and usage of specialised climbing equipment is crucial for safe completion of routes. ​ Kyrenia Mountains Rock Climbing In 2007, the leading rock-climbing enthusiasts of North Cyprus Nazife ‘Nazo’ Canıtez and İnan Taşlı invited the professional rock climbers of Türkiye, Tunç Fındık and Doğan Palut to open the first routes on the Kyrenia Mountains together. This pioneer group designated the Kartal Kayası rock outcrop to be the most suitable and accessible place, and installed climbing bolts to create the first climbing area in Northern Cyprus. Rock type is very important in designating climbing areas, as outcrops must be free of easily crumbled rocks, which may break during a climb. The Kyrenia Mountains are particularly suitable for rock climbing as there are plenty of outcrops of very strong dolomitic limestones, mostly recrystallized and brecciated. ​ Lead climbing In lead climbing, one person, called the “leader”, will climb from the ground up, with rope directly attached to their harness (not through a top anchor). The second person, “belays” the leader by feeding out enough rope to allow upward progression without undue slack. As the leader progresses, they clip the rope through intermediate points of protection (bolts,) with quick express carabiners, to limit the length of a potential fall. Top Things To Do > Water Sports A must of your holiday in North Cyprus is water sports. The lure of the clear blue waters of the warm Mediterranean Sea is almost irresistible, so there’s plenty of water sports on offer to make the most of this fantastic aquatic playground. Most seaside hotels offer water sports or you can take part in them via specialist firms at Kyrenia or other ports. ​ Windsurfing The north coast is ideal for windsurfing, with enough wind to enjoy yourself without being blown to Turkey. Beginners can learn in calm coves where errors only mean a dip in the sea. The main windsurfing hire companies and training schools are based west of Kyrenia and at resort hotels near Salamis. For stronger winds, expert windsurfers should head off the capes and ride the waves in style. ​ Water skiing and Mono-skiing Beginners are well catered for since the sea is usually calm and warm for those inevitable spills. Beach tuition is available, experienced skiers are also welcome and you can also mono-ski. ​ Banana Boats The only skill needed for these fun rides is the ability to hang on tight and scream a lot. Fun for all the family, these rides are very popular on the beaches. Just pop on a life jacket and join in the fun. What holiday video would be complete without footage of a banana ride? Jet skiing You might need a driving licence to hire a jet ski, but once you do these mean machines are great fun to zip around the coastline, but make sure you avoid any nesting turtle beaches or military zones. Kyrenia has jet skis available for hire for use off its 1km long sandy beach, and the public beach at Glapsides north of Famagusta also have jet skis to hire. ​ Power boating North Cyprus powerboat trips come complete with an experienced driver. Just sit back and enjoy the ride as the magnificent coastline of Northern Cyprus flies past in a flurry of spray. ​ Canoeing Canoes can be hired from most major hotels, and for a peaceful paddle around the coast they can’t be beaten. Ideal for spotting fish or swimming turtles, without even getting wet! ​ Sailing/Yachting Courses can be found in the local harbour towns. Sailing is a very calm and tranquil way of skirting the coastline, with the summer weather meaning the seas are extremely calm. It’s become a very popular pastime since the first Eastern Mediterranean Yacht Rally in 1990 which visited North Cyprus as part of its route, and is now a major feature of the yachting calendar featuring around 100 vessels. ​ Water Parks Another favourite for kids and adults alike. The Oscar and Acapulco Resorts to the east of Kyrenia, both have great water slide parks to spend hours mucking around in, with slides, huge pools, flumes and even organised daily pool activities for children in the summer. Both are open to non-residents of the hotel for a fee. On the west coast of Kyrenia there’s the slide park and wave pool at the Club Lapethos in Lapta, or in Famagusta there is the Club Exotic which has a slide park. Paragliding As you soar like a bird with a para glider, the umbrellas lined up on the bright white beach and the colour of the turquoise blue sea make you feel like you’re looking at a giant tourist brochure. ​ Swimming There’s plenty of places to have a dip in the Med, and you can either drive along the coast to find secluded and sheltered spots, or spend the day at one of the many beach clubs around the central areas. There’s indoor and outdoor pools at the major hotels that are also open to non-residents, normally free if you have a bite to eat while you’re there. Other Water Sports Yes, there’s more! You can also hire a water bicycle, go tubing, knee boarding, wake boarding and almost any other kind of boarding you can imagine! Just ask your hotel reception for details, or see what everyone else is doing on the beach. Top Things To Do > Zipline Top

  • Reservations | Whats On In TRNC

    Rezervasyon Yaptırın Ayrıntıları seçin, size en uygun yerleri bulalım Konum Eagle's Nest Kişi sayısı 2 kişi Tarih Saat

  • Churches | Whats On In TRNC

    Guides > Churches Apostolos Andreas Bellapais Abbey Sourp Magar Monastery St Francis Church St Mary Church Ayia Zone Ganchvor Monastery St Andrews Church St George of the Greeks St Nikolas Church Ayios Philon Panagia Chrysopolitissa St Anne Church St George of the Latins St Simeon Church Ayias Trias Basilica Panayia Pergamininiotissa St Barnabas Monastery St Mamas Monastery The Twin Churches Guides > Churches > Apostolos Andreas Monastery The easternmost monastery on the island, for hundreds of years it's served as an important resting place for followers of the Orthodox faith on pilgrimage to the Holy Land . As an important multi-faith place of pilgrimage, visitors from all over the world to this monastery offer their devotion or pray for healing. It's almost at the end of the Karpaz peninsula, and is a place of reverence by both Turkish and Greek Cypriots. It's thought there's been a monastery here since Byzantine times, and is possibly the location of the surrender of Isaac Commenos to Richard the Lionheart in 1191. St Andrew, a follower of John the Baptist, was the first man who was called to become a priest, and as such received the title of “O Protoklidos”, which means “the first one to have been called”. One of the stories about him is that on his way to Jerusalem, the boat in which he was sailing ran out of water, As the captain, who was blind in one eye, was wondering how he would find water, St Andrew told him that he would find water in the place where the monastery now stands. Those who went ashore found water there, as they had been told. The water was brought back to the ship, and as the captain drank the water, sight returned to his eye. He wanted to reward Stndrew by giving him valuable goods but St Andrew would not accept them. Instead, the captain and his crew converted to Christianity. Afterwards, the captain bought a very valuble icon of StAndrew and put it by the well. Thereafter, the site became a place of pilgrimage known as "the Lourdes of Cyprus " and in the 15th century, a small chapel was built close to the shore, where you can still collect the healing water. The church of the main monastery dates to the 18th century, with main buildings 100 years younger. ​ Although St Andrew is known primarily as a saint who is able to cure health problems related to the eyes, those who have other incurable illnesses or worries believe that they can be cured by praying to him too. Those who have their wishes granted, depending on the nature of their problem, leave a small figure of an eye, ear, hand or child made out of wax or metal next to the religious icons. Amongst the offerings made to StAndrew are money, silver, gold and other jewellery. Those who cannot come to the monastery can make an offering to him by taking a bottle of olive oil and throwing it into the sea at the closest point. It's believed that by taking control of the winds, St Andrew will ensure that sooner or later the bottles will be taken to the priests at the monastery. Mass pilgrimage only dates to the early 20th century. Apparently, in 1895, the son of Maria Georgiou was kidnapped. Seventeen years later, St Andrew appeared to her in a dream, telling her to pray for her son's return at the monastery. Living in Anatolia, she embarked on the crossing on a crowded boat. Telling her story during the journey, one of the passengers, a young Dervish priest, became more and more interested. Asking if her son had any distinguishing marks, and on hearing of a pair of birthmarks, he stripped off his clothes to reveal the same marks, and mother and son were reunited. ​ On your arrival, you'll see a courtyard, surrounded by cloisters where the pilgrims once stayed. Looking towards the sea, you 'll see the bell tower of the church where you'll find some icons and normally some nuns or a retired priest acting as caretakers. The small chaperl which has been built next to it in the Gothic style is the monastery's oldest building, thought to have been built in the 15th century. The church to the far west of the chapel was built in 1867 by the priest of DIpkarpaz, Babayuannu Ilkonomou. The monastery rooms which are set arounf the church and chapel qwew built attsome poit after1912. Further down the slope, you'll reach the oldest part of the monastery and the holy well. On two days of the year, the monastery is really busy; August 15th, Assumption Day (when Mary was "assumed" into heaven to be reunited with her soul), and November 30th, which is St Andrew's day. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, Greece, Cyprus and Russia. Although the monastery fell into disrepair in recent years, funding for refurbishment was provided by Church of Cyprus, EVKAF Administration and the United States Agency for International Developmen t (USAID). The first phase concerned the restoration of the main church, and the building of a new north arcade. On November 30th, St Andrew's day, the completed first phase was handed back to the Church of Cyprus, and a service was held. Phase two will see the chapel and the fountain close to the shore renovated. Phase three will see the restoration of the buildings to the north of the church, and the final phase will involve the completion of external works below the main road, and landscaping. Top Guides > Churches > Ayia Zone Church Ayia Zone is typical of Orthodox churches built in later medieval times, with Gothic architecture incorporated into otherwise Byzantine forms. In the south east of Famagusta, close to St Nikolas church , it's one of 3 remaining Byzantine churches in the area, the other being St Simeon . A simple cross-shaped church it may well stand on earlier foundations. It's likely this church was abandoned or used for other purposes during the Ottoman reign, as it's maintained itself very well throughout hundreds of years. Ayia Zone is dedicated to the sacred belt of the Virgin Mary . According to tradition, the Holy Belt was made by the Virgin Mary herself out of camel hair,. was about 90cm long, with strings at the end to tie it up. Three days after she died, during her ascension, she gave the belt to the Apostle Thomas. Thomas and the other Apostles opened her grave, but didn't find her body so the belt is seen as proof of her ascension into heaven. At some point, it must have had a piece of this cloth, a sacred relic of the clothing of Mary. It's currently used as a rehearsal room for a local theatre group and contains fragmentary frescoes of the Archangel Michael . Top Guides > Churches > Ayia Philon Church Dating to the 10thcentury, this church was dedicated to the saint who converted people of Karpaz to Christianity in the 4thcentury. It was built on top of ruins from Hellenistic and Roman periods and is pretty much all that remains of the Phoenician port of Karpasia. Founded by King Pygmalion of Cyprus , it was a flourishing trading port between Salamis and Anatolia. It was abandoned in 802 after Arab raiders sacked it and inhabitants moved inland, founding Dipkarpaz. Traces of the old harbour wall can still be seen offshore, but the majority of the village is now under sand dunes west of the church. The church is named after St Philo , who converted locals to Christianity, and had been ordained by St Epiphanios in the 4th Century. (St Epiphanios' Basilica is at Salamis). It's a typically domed Byzantine church, with a 3-part apse and a courtyard surrounded by columns. There's a cistern and baptising room, as well as numerous mosaics from the earlier structure. Top Guides > Churches > Ayias Trias Basilica To the North of the small village of Sipahi , this basilica has been dated to the end of the 5thcentury. Destroyed by Arab raiders in the 7th century, it was discovered by accident in 1957 and is famous for its well-preserved mosaics, but they've been left to the elements and their colours are fading. It must have been a grand building in its day, with the richness of the floors suggesting wealth of the surrounding areas in Byzantine times. Decorated with geometric, leaf and cross motifs, there's also an inscription in front of the main apse which credits a deacon called Heraclos as having “paid for the building of this part of the structure”. There are 3 unusual areas of mosaic. Two show pairs of sandals, one facing in and one facing outward as well as a representation of pomegranates. The site boasts remains of what must have been an impressive solea , a barrier running down the middle of the church, marking out spaces for clergy and other members of the congregation. A cross-shaped baptismal pool can be seen in the baptistery. There's also a number of wheat mills, thought to have been used to grind wheat for bread used in religious ceremonies. In May 2018, plans were announced for preservation works. Top Guides > Churches > Bellapais Abbey Bellapais Abbey, also known as Bellapais Monastery, was founded by the French ruler Aimery , to house Augustinian monks expelled from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre when Jerusalem fell to Saladin in 1187. Known as the “Abbaye de la Paix”, (Abbey of Peace), most of what remains dates from 1267–84, with the cloisters and refectory added in 1324–59. In its early years the monastery adopted strict beliefs, but as time went by it became known as a place where monks ate and drank to excess, took wives (sometimes two or three), had children, and would then only accept their own sons into the monastery as novices. Very French you might say. Though it built up considerable wealth, its treasure was plundered by the Genoese in 1373. After the Ottoman Conquest in 1571 the abbey became derelict, and was raided for its dressed building stone, although the church escaped as it was used by the local Greek Orthodox community. ​ Vandalization of the monastery continued under the British, who even used the refectory as a rifle range. Very British you might say. It's not uncommon for Monasteries and abbeys to be built in spectacular locations and this is no exception. The ruins overlook the sea from a small square filled with trees, lawns, flowerbeds and park benches. When you go in, you’ll see the Kybele Restaurant , which occupies the abbey’s kitchen court, and a set of steps to the abbey’s medieval tower which is far too good a photo-op to miss.Tall Gothic arches standing shoulder to shoulder invite you into the cloisters. This is one of the iconic images of North Cyprus and a must visit place on your holidays. The flat roofed church is the most complete part of the monastery. North of the church are the cloisters, the most atmospheric part of the abbey. Poplar trees were planted in the quadrangle in 1940, and are now home to a flock of sparrows whose constant chirping just adds to the unique atmosphere of the place. To the north of the cloisters, accessed via a superb doorway with dog-tooth edges and three Lusignan coats of arms, is the refectory. 30m long, 10m wide and 12m high, it’s covered by a single-span stone vaulted roof, an architectural triumph considering it stands at the edge of a cliff. It's illuminated by natural light that streams through its windows, throwing shadows across the columns. At one end was the Abbot’s high table in front of long tables of the monks. There’s also a pulpit where scriptures would be read to silently eating monks. Outside the refectory is a fountain where monks would wash their hands and if you look carefully you can make out the Roman sarcophagus into which it’s been incorporated. Concerts and musical events take place in the abbey from May to October , mostly in the refectory. It’s also used for weddings during summer months, and it’s hard to imagine a more beautiful and romantic setting. ​ Lawrence Durrell lived in Bellapais from 1953–56. His house is up from the abbey square, past the Tatlisu market on Aci Limon Sokak (Bitter Lemon Street) and has a ceramic plaque above the door. Across the road is the public water fountain (marked “ER 1953”), which played a prominent part in the tortuous and hilarious process of buying the house, which takes up a whole chapter in his book. Another chapter of the book is devoted to the “Tree of Idleness ” that stands opposite the abbey. Durrell was warned never to sit under it because “its shadow incapacitates one for serious work”, a belief that arose from the idle hours spent by many villagers under the tree. Legend has it that those who sit under the tree will become so lethargic and relaxed they’ll be unwilling to work, and Durrell was struck by how true this legend seemed. It‘s now the centrepiece of a pretty good restaurant. The Village Halfway between St Hilarion and Buffavento , 210m above sea level, is the flower-covered village of Bellapais. Full of narrow lanes and steep hills with views of Kyrenia, Bellapais is best known for its medieval abbey, one of the most beautiful in the eastern Mediterranean. The village itself is a step back in time, with quiet lanes and whitewashed houses. The name Bellapais comes from the French ‘belle paix’, meaning ‘beautiful peace ’. It's popular because of the abbey, but was also made more famous by English author Lawrence Durrell who lived here in the 1950s ,and included descriptions of the village and its inhabitants in his classic holiday reading book “Bitter Lemons ”. To find Bellapais, head east from Kyrenia, turn right at the Bellapais-signposted “peace” roundabout (with its two figures holding olive branches), then take the first main turning left. At the top of the hill, turn left at the roundabout, and continue on to the village where there’s parking. There’s no shortage of restaurants and bars in the village, with many in the square overlooking the abbey. While the abbey is definitely a must see, there’s also ancient crusader paths that criss-cross the mountains where you can follow in the footsteps of Richard the Lionheart. Accommodation There’s a good choice of accommodation if you’d like to stay in the village. A stone’s thrown from the Abbey is The Abbey Inn , a small boutique hotel with only ten rooms, small pool and a restaurant. Close by is another small but quality hotel called The Residence . Then there's Bellapais Monastery Village , and further down the road, about half-way to Kyrenia, is Altinkaya Holiday Village . A short walk from the abbey takes you to Bellapais Garden Top Guides > Churches > Ganchvor Monastery Ganchvor Sourp Asdvadzadzin is the Armenian Apostolic church located within the walled city of Famagusta. The Armenians escaped Mameluke attacks against Ayas of Cilicia and arrived from the southern coast of Turkey, before the French Lusignans arrived. Like other non-Latin or non-Orthodox Christians, they settled in the Syrian quarter of the city, especially populated with Carmelites . The Armenian church was built in 1346 by Armenian refugees from Cilicia in a typical fortress-like Armenian style with Cypriot masonry. and was part of an important monastic and cultural centre, where Saint Nerses Lampronatsi is said to have studied in the 12th century, suggesting it was an important theological institute. A scriptorium devoted to the writing, copying and illuminating of manuscripts operated here, manuscripts of which survive at the Armenian Saint James’ Monastery in Jerusalem. After the Ottoman siege, the church became unused from 1571. Records show that until 1862, it featured a small bell-tower. It was preserved by the Department of Antiquities in 1907 and in 1936 it was leased to the Armenian community of Famagusta for a period of 99 years. After repairs between 1937 and 1944, the first liturgy was held on 14 January 1945 by Archimandrite Krikor Bahlavouni, but it was partially burnt by militia in 1957. After being repaired, it was used as a church until 1962. It was taken over by Turkish Cypriots and then in August 1974 by the Turkish military. Even after the partial lifting of movement restrictions by Northern Cyprus in 2003, it was still inaccessible, as it was located within a "military area". It’s now accessible. It's small, with only one aisle and a cylindrical apse. The roof is in the shape of a cruciform, and the apse is covered with a semi-dome. There is some evidence that a second chapel was added to the north east, but this hasn’t survived. Outside the church, crosses have been inscribed on the wall by pilgrims as a declaration of faith. Beyond the southern door, you can also see traces of a medieval sun dial . It adjoins the Carmelite church, which was established at a similar period, as part of a monastic complex dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Top Guides > Churches > Panagia Chrysopolitissa Kyrenia's Oldest Church. Dating to the 1500’s it was built as a Latin church and set in narrow back streets behind Kyrenia Harbour, almost opposite the rear entrance to the Folk Art Museum . The interesting architectural feature is a Gothic doorway on the north side. The Crucifixion of Jesus Christ is also depicted on the wall of the front entrance. Though now blocked up it doesn't appear to be in its' original state and may well have come from another, and larger, Gothic building. Top Guides > Churches > Panayia Pergamininiotissa A late Byzantine church, dating from the 11th century in Tatlısu, an unspoilt coastal village 20 km from Esentepe. Has a interesting cylindrical apse but the building is square shaped, with the roof in the form of a cross, topped with a drum on which sits a small dome. It may have been built over a much earlier one, as foundations were exposed outside the apse during renovation. Wall paintings from the 11th and 12th centuries have mainly been removed, although some still remain. Look carefully and you can see the overgrown ruined foundations of buildings that once surrounded the church, reached via some paths. Works to prevent deterioration of the building means it is no longer possible to get inside, however it is still worth taking a look at, especially if you plan to tour the Minia Cyprus Museum within the same grounds, another must-see for visitors. Top Guides > Churches > Sourp Magar Monastery Also known as Magaravank , this is an Armenian monastery set in a forested valley in the Alevkaya range. First established in the 11th century as a Coptic (Egyptian Christian) monastery, it came into Armenian hands about the 15th century. The Armenians retained control of its lands under Venetian and Ottoman rule when it was often called the Blue Monastery, on account of the colour of the doors and windows. 530 metres above sea level, also referred to as the Monastery of the Virgin Mary, Sourp Magar had been a religious centre for Armenians for centuries, the quiet surroundings providing a haven for clergymen and laymen alike. The Armenian community in Nicosia used it as a summer retreat, and it became a stopover for pilgrims headed for Jerusalem. It once housed a collection of manuscripts and other sacred items which were relocated to the Holy See of Cilicia in 1947. Upheavals in the Ottoman empire at the beginning of the 20th century resulted in the arrival of thousands of Armenian refugees to the island, and the monastery opened its doors to orphans and those in need. It helped feed the hungry by developing farming on monastery lands which ran to around 3,000 acres. Although the last monks left in the early 20th century, the monastery remained a favourite place for Armenian families and schools to visit, as the grounds were particularly pleasant, especially in hot summer months. The residential buildings at Sourp Magar are extremely important for the history of architecture in Cyprus, being the best-preserved and most extensive examples of late medieval domestic building on the island, even in its current state. It consists of an irregular rectangle of two-storied residential buildings constructed around a generous precinct, sited on an overall slope. Two small churches or chapels, standing in the north-east part of the central courtyard, stand side-by-side. The largest chapel, with its vault still in place, was built in 1814. The line of residential buildings facing towards the north and east probably belong to the 15th century judging from the shape and style of the Gothic windows and doors. One window has a chevron design, a characteristic feature of later Gothic building in Cyprus. These buildings were probably put up when the Armenians first took possession of the site. Internally, the buildings are two-storied, with a simple arcade below and a walkway above. The walkway was originally edged by stone posts with wooden lintels. The roofs throughout rested on wooden beams and were covered with curved tiles. Inside the monastery enclosure you can still see the remains of an orchard with a tiny church and pilgrims’ cells lining the east and south perimeter walls. It's well worth a visit to soak up the atmosphere, marvel at the distant views or even picnic in the grounds. Armenians retain great attachment to their ancient establishment and pilgrimages have been made there in recent years. Access to this monastery lies on the road that leads from the Five Finger Mountain to Alevkaya. After driving for about 6.5km, looking down at the valley below, the monastery buildings will be seen nestling among the pine trees. Top Guides > Churches > St Andrews Church One of two Anglican churches in North Cyprus, St Andrew’s was built in 1913 thanks to the generosity of a lay reader Ernest Eldred McDonald and a wealthy Scottish mine owner George Houstoun, and is approaching 110 years of service to the Kyrenia community. The site of the Church was well chosen. A few yards from Kyrenia Castle and the Harbour , it's near to the centre of the town and much of the congregation is holiday visitors. Well seen from the outside, the church tower itself was constructed 25 years after the main build. Items of interest within the church include the bowl of the font, which is a domestic marble mortar found in 1949 at Lambousa and dated to the 6th century A.D. It's part of the Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf (one of the four dioceses that make up the Episcopal Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East), which includes Cyprus, the Gulf States, Iraq and Yemen, and also a part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Top Guides > Churches > St Anne Church The church of St Anne was probably built in the early 14th Century and was part of a monastic complex. It was erected in what was known as the Syrian quarter and was originally a Latin, Catholic church before it was passed to Maronites later in the century. Located in the walled city of Famagusta, next to the Martinengo Bastion , it forms part of the “Martinengo Cluster” – a collection of monuments conserved to promote the economic growth and territorial development of those regions. St Anne was restored by both the Turkish and Greek Cypriot communities in 2018. It consists of a single nave with 2 bays, with groin vaults separated by transverse ribs. The walls are supported by external buttresses, between which are tall windows, a typically Gothic feature. It's believed the original facade supported a belfry. Top Guides > Churches > St Barnabas Monastery Head west from Salamis and you’ll come to the Monastery of St Barnabas, once one of the most important Christian sites, now an archaeological and icon museum. Said to have been built as the result of a divinely inspired dream, it consists of the church of St Barnabas and monastery cloisters, which is a colonnade of pillars on three sides of a lush and well-tended garden. An extension. further colonnades and a campanile, though modern, fits in pretty well with the rest of the building. The white domes are the local landmarks. ​ The buildings An archaeological museum housed in rooms that overlook the garden, contains Neolithic axe-heads, Bronze Age pottery, Iron Age antiquities and Ottoman artefacts. A stunning collection dating back to the 7th Century BC, they're kept in the monks' old cells and are mostly intact. It also has a small gift shop and restaurant. ​ An Icon Museum housed in the church of St Barnabas is a large collection of lit-up icons, depicting mostly well-known religious figures which are in great condition. Some of the Orthodox furnishings remain, including the pulpit, a chair and the iconostasis or screen. Four frescoes to the right of the entrance tell the story of the finding of St Barnabas’s body. What is said to be the tomb of the Barnabas himself is housed in a 1950s-built mausoleum about 100 yards from the monastery, built on the spot where his remains were discovered. Brief History St Barnabas is the patron saint of Cyprus . Over the years, Cyprus had rulers with different religious beliefs which have intermingled and the result is an island with mixed religions, churches and mosques. In Roman times most people practised Judaism, including St. Barnabas who came from Salamis. He travelled to the Holy Land to study law, met Paul the apostle and converted to Christianity. He was made the Archbishop of Salamis, returned, founded the Cypriot church and became a preacher. See The Bible Acts 4: 36-37, & Acts 13: 1-5 for reference. He convinced the Roman ruler Sergius Paulus to adopt Christianity, making Cyprus the first country in the world to have a Christian ruler. Together with his cousin Mark the Evangelist and the pivotal St Paul, he travelled extensively in both Cyprus and Asia Minor, spreading the gospel. Barnabas was so successful the Jewish elders in Salamis had him stoned to death around 75 AD. Mark retrieved his body and buried it secretly in a cave to the west of the city. Over time, the location of the cave was forgotten. 400 years later Cypriot Church under Archbishop Anthemios was faced with a takeover bid by Antioch , the patriarch of which claimed the right to rule over the island’s Christians, a claim supported by Byzantine Emperor Zeno . In 478 AD, when all seemed lost, Anthemios was visited in a dream by the spirit of St Barnabas, who told him where his body was buried – beneath a distinctive carob tree on the western edge of Salamis. Anthemios discovered a skeleton along with a copy of The Gospel of Matthew written in Hebrew by St Barnabas himself. Anthemios shot off to Constantinople, donated the book to the Emperor and the Church of Cyprus was triumphantly granted autonomous status. Zeno also paid for a monastery to be built over the saint’s final resting place. In Cyprus, most churches feature an icon of Barnabas holding St Matthew’s gospel, placed in the backrest of the bishop’s chair. St Barnabas is said to be the patron saint of peace making and hailstorms , with St. Barnabas day taking place on June 11th. The monastery crumbled over the years and was replaced in the 18th Century. It was rebuilt with three domes, but lack of foundations and soft soil made one of the domes and an apse collapse. The third dome wasn’t replaced but the walls of the original apse can still be seen. Top Guides > Churches > St Francis Church During the life of St Francis of Assisi, this was the most important structure of the Franciscan order in Cyprus. It was part of a Franciscan monastery in the north of the Royal Palace of Venice, built by priests. Today it can be found close to the Venetian Palace. It consists of a three-sided apse with a small chapel off the south side. Buttressing supported the external walls. It was built in the 14th Century with funding supplied by Henry II who was known for his close ties with the Franciscans. Henry's reign was anything but peaceful. He saw the fall of Acre in 1291, was imprisoned himself from 1306 to 1310, and saw the disbandment of the Knights Templars in 1313. He funded the building of this church, the fortification of Famagusta, and the start of the rebuilding of St Nicholas Cathedral. The Franciscans were founded in 1209 by Francis of Assisi as part of the Catholic Church. Followers gave up all their possessions and life to live in poverty and they became famous for their love, simplicity and practices. Francis himself was believed to have visited Cyprus during a trip to the Holy Land during the Crusades. The Franciscans are one of the oldest and most important Latin religious groups in Cyprus, and their monasteries in Famagusta have become some of the city's most important religious structures. The site housed a monastery that occupied a large area within the city and because of its proximity, the Royal Palace once had a private entrance to the monastery and church, through a steeped road. Nobles from Famagusta, Genoa and overseas who contributed to the construction of the church are buried in this area. Archaeologists discovered tombs dating back to 1314-1474 under the church. Structurally, it resembled the Church of Mary with side chapels added. Outside walls are supported by struts, and visitors can see medieval stone workmanship outside the western gate. The monastery, which didn't survive, was believed to be located to the southwest of the church. Top Guides > Churches > St George of the Greeks Church This Nestorian Church , officially known as the Church of St George the Exile r, is in Famagusta. Not to be confused with St George of the Latins , it is the second largest church in Famagusta, and during the middle ages served as a Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Built in the 12th century around the time St Nicholas Cathedral was initiated, it was financed by East Syrian Nestorian merchants, the Lakhas brothers, who were known for their immense wealth. It's architecture and decorations were reminiscent of Southern French and Italian Gothic churches of the time, and may have been influenced by King Peter I’ s visit to Avignon in 1363, although its' architecture is also reminiscent of the 12th–13th century Crusader architecture in Palestine and Syria. ​ The Orthodox Cathedral When the French Catholic Lusignans took rule of the island in 1191, they inherited an island that was predominately eastern Orthodox, and they immediately reduced the power of the church. In doing so, the southeast corner of Famagusta became a compact Greek quarter, and a conglomeration of several churches came about, most still inherent today and within close proximity of one another. Although there was a perfectly serviceable cathedral church, namely the small Byzantine St Simeon Church , the Orthodox community wanted a place of worship that rivalled its neighbouring counterparts. They built the much greater church with a wide central nave, two side aisles and huge columns that held up the nave vaulting. Gothic elements were also added to the church’s north side to create a hybrid form of architecture that makes this 14th century Byzantine figure somewhat rare amongst Mediterranean churches. The central nave also featured chapels on both sides, leading to a cross nave, all with rounded apses. St George of the Greeks became the Orthodox cathedral of Famagusta and was dedicated to St Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis , who had gained a reputation as a strong defender of orthodoxy. It's believed the saint’s remains were formerly buried at the adjacent St Simeon before his body was taken to Constantinople by Emperor Leo in the 9th century. Unfortunately, the structure was too large, with insufficient buttressing and a roof that was just too heavy, and years of modifications and renovations followed. The pillars throughout the nave were expanded to take more weight, and the roof was inserted with large upturned terracotta pots to spread the load. The church was not in existence long enough to find out if the revised compositions were sustainable. Taking the brunt of the Ottomans, evidence of which is still very evident in the remaining walls, the main of the build stood for a little over a hundred years. ​ Siege of Famagusta After the capture of the city, the church was converted into a stable for camels , with worship here only being permitted once a year, during the feast of St George the Exiler. The Ottoman siege in 1571 left its marks on the structure and visitors today can still see cannon ball marks on the top of the church and cannonballs still embedded in the walls. Consequently, little remains of its vaulted roof. It's believed that during this era the apse was used as a shooting gallery, and there is much evidence in the form of bullet holes to be seen. By the 18th century, it was more or less abandoned, with only a handful of residents living near to the desolate churches. Sailors from the nearby port would disembark and come into the city, sometimes sketching drawings of their ships into the plaster of these derelict churches. Some of these etchings can be seen at the western end of the St George Greek church. In 1905, the British administration handed the church to Greek Cypriots , who used it as their parish. By the 1930’s, many frescoes that were previously observed had disappeared, and between 1937 and 1939, Greek Cypriots undertook excavations and repaired some parts of the build. The church is still nevertheless home to numerous frescoes dated to the 14th and 15th centuries, depicting the life of Christ. Unlike Byzantine Orthodox churches, the frescoes in the Nestorian Church were not part of a unified design, and many were painted in differing periods by various artists. Visitors can still make out the faint outlines of once-rich frescos upon the interior stone walls. The apse on the other hand may have had a unified design, but this is impossible to ascertain given the level of damage. The church walls are made of ashlar and the structure has three naves and three apses. All three naves have entrances to their west. Originally, the church was built with a single nave and a protruding apse while the other two naves and two minor apses were added at a later date. Some fragments of wall paintings still cling to the walls of the eastern apse, and pieces of pottery jars sit within the ceiling, which were thought to improve the church acoustics. During the pre-Ottoman modifications, collars were added to support the overweight, and visitors will notice the remains of the iron clamps that were used to hold the blocks together. A drawing of the church from the 18th century shows a dome on the church, not unlike the one on the nearby St Nikolas Church , an octagonal drum with the dome sat on top. Even with the extra support added to the pillars, eventually the dome has fallen to inexistence. Along the walls of the church, you can see several arched niches. These alcoves were the tombs of the patrons of the church. The sarcophagus was at ground level, while the brackets you can see would have held a stone slab, probably with an effigy of the deceased carved on it. It's believed these niches were built after the walls, and their construction further weakened the roof support. Excavations on this site have also unearthed coloured glass, most likely from the old church windows. The only church in Famagusta that still has a bell, the Church of St George of the Greeks is one of the best-preserved from medieval times despite the damage incurred and yet another impressive ruin to add to your visit list with much to discover. Top Guides > Churches > St George of the Latins Church Sitting amid a traffic intersection, St George of the Latins is one of Famagusta’s oldest churches. Located in the northern part of the old city, close to Othello’s Tower , the remaining walls with their distinctive lancet windows, are a great example of early Gothic architecture. Though the precise date of its construction is unknown, evidence of a fortified parapet where defenders could protect the church, indicates that St George was built at a time when the Lusignans had not yet completed the city walls, most likely in the last quarter of the 13th century, using materials removed from Salamis. Its design is said to be inspired by Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, considered among the highest achievements of the Rayonnant period of Gothic architecture, and consecrated in 1248. Despite what remains today is predominantly the northern and eastern walls, the remnants indicate what the edifice may have looked like in its prime. ​ Thin columns built into the walls were usually elaborately carved with religious figures or with coats of arms belonging to benefactors of the church. Areas of the walls between the pillars were structured to be relatively free of weight, one of the main features of Gothic architecture, granting huge windows and substantial sunlight to enter the church. In the south west corner, the first steps of what was a spiral staircase leading up to the roof can be seen, and to the north west, remnants of a guard house with a conical roof, the entrance doorway still unmistakable. Following the line of the roof you can still see some of the protective wall, complete with arrow slots, another reason researchers believe the church was built before the city walls were completed. As was the case with most of the towering buildings, the city walls didn't provide complete protection and the church suffered damage during the Ottoman siege of 1570 – 1571, some of which can still be observed on the eastern wall of the church. The only entrance which survives is to the north, and this is comparatively well preserved. It's surrounded by carvings – a gargoyle in the form of a monk opening his mouth with his hand, most likely used to drain water from the walls, and also of a lion devouring a lamb. Not to be confused with the similarly named St George of the Greeks church which is a few minutes walk away. Top Guides > Churches > St Mamas Monastery Dedicated to the island’s beloved tax-repelling patron saint, the monastery was formerly the site of a pagan temple. St Mamas Monastery in Guzelyurt is the third most important place of worship for the Greek Orthodox in North Cyprus, after the St Barnabas Tomb at Famagusta and the Apostolos Andreas Monastery in Karpaz . Today it also houses several significant icons and artefacts. ​ Legendary Tales According to local legend, Mamas was a hermit living in extremely poor circumstances in a cave outside of town. When the authorities tried to tax him, he pleaded poverty and evaded them for some time. Soldiers were sent out to recoup the levy and arrested him at his dwelling. On the way back he escaped by jumping on to the back of a ferocious lion attacking a lamb, and he rode it all the way into town while carrying the injured lamb in his arms. On seeing this sight, the Byzantine authorities were so impressed that they decided to exempt him from paying taxes for the rest of his life and of any punishment. Since then, St Mamas has been the Patron Saint of tax avoiders and so famous locally there are over 10 churches on the island dedicated to this Christian Saint. Another tale says Mamas was killed in Anatolia and placed by his family in a stone coffin aided by Jesus Christ. The story continues with the coffin swept away to sea and washed up on the shores of Guzelyurt Bay. Discovered by a local farmer, he harnessed the immensely hefty coffin to two oxen and hauled it as far as the beasts could manage, and when they could go no further, a church was built around it. ​ The Church Most of this compound dates from the 18th century but its Iconostasis, the lavish wall of icons and religious paintings separating the nave from the sanctuary, is a gorgeous sample of artful wood carving of the 16th century. The church in the monastery was originally a Byzantine building, built on the site of an Aphrodite temple. It has been reconstructed at various times over the centuries, and most of the buildings today date to the 18th century, when the large central dome was also added. The side portals and columns of the nave survive from an earlier Gothic church built by the Lusignans. A strange mixture of Gothic and Byzantine styles, it’s more spacious than many other Orthodox churches on the island. It has a central nave, apse, and two side aisles, with the grand dome that rises above the nave at the altar end, pierced by six tall narrow windows. The columns are decorated with foliar carvings, vine leaves and visages carved with clear delineation. Into the Iconostasis are incorporated marble panels that are carved with Venetian coats of arms, and there are two marble pillars on either side of the Holy Door that are evidence of early recycling, probably from an earlier church, though not necessarily on this site. The pulpit was built in 1711, and the oldest icon is dated to around 1745. There’s no evidence this church was ever in use by members of the Catholic faith and therefore presumably it has always been a place of Orthodox worship. The most beautiful exhibit in the church is the magnificent crystal chandelier that hangs in the centre of the apse and surprises every visitor upon entry through the side entrance as its plain outer façade gives no hint of the splendid interior. Hundreds of droplets glow with all the iridescence of the spectrum when the lamps are lit, and it's flanked by smaller, though equally elegant, examples of the glass-blowers craft. St Mamas is shown as a relief on the outside of the church, as well as on several icons inside. Monastery buildings are to the north and east, and records show them as being built in 1779. Architecturally, the arches on the front of the northern buildings that reflect a traditional style, are quite different to those on the eastern side, which have a resemblance to 18th century Ottoman inns, with stone columns on the ground floor and timber balconies on the second. ​ Tomb of St Mamas The marble sarcophagus of the Saint can be found forming part of the north wall of the church, surrounded by richly carved decorations, many in the shape of ear drums, depicting scenes of excruciating martyrdom. It’s said that during Ottoman rule, believing there was treasure hidden in the coffin, they pierced holes into its lid, from which in turn an ointment liquid oozed out. This liquid, which appeared at irregular intervals, was purported to have curative properties. Around the tomb you will see offerings in the shape of ears since St Mamas is not only the Patron Saint of tax avoiders, but also of those suffering ear aches and infections! ​ Icon Museum Whilst the Icon collection isn't as extensive as the collection at the St Barnabas Monastery, St Mamas remains without doubt the most beautiful and best kept of all the Orthodox churches that are preserved as Icon Museums on the island, and is the highlight of any visit to Güzelyurt . The magnificent collection of religious Icons is certainly worth seeing, as is the skilled art and craftwork dating back many centuries. Top Guides > Churches > St Mary Church Located in the bastion precinct, this church was one of the city’s larger buildings. In the 13th century, middle eastern Christians fled the Holy Land and although Christian, their beliefs weren't Latin or Orthodox and they tended to congregate in the same area. In1311, Pope Clement V allowed the Carmelites to settle in Cyprus. Two other mendicant orders, the Franciscan and Dominican , were established 15 years prior and the Augustinians, the last of the mendicant orders, arrived shortly after. The Carmelites originated from the Carmel mountains of Northern Israel and settled in what later became known as the Syrian quarter of the city. The church was built in the 14th Century as part of a monastic complex dedicated to the Virgin Mary , hence its name. Other churches were built in the town at the same time, as Famagusta was one of the richest cities in Christendom. It was close to where the Venetians would later build the Martinengo Bastion in the 16th century. It adjoined the Armenian monastery, established at the same time, and was next to other monasteries Located in the bastion precinct, this church was one of the city’s larger buildings. In the 13th century, middle eastern Christians fled the Holy Land and although Christian, their beliefs weren't Latin or Orthodox and they tended to congregate in the same area. In1311, Pope Clement V allowed the Carmelites to settle in Cyprus. Two other mendicant orders, the Franciscan and Dominican , were established 15 years prior and the Augustinians, the last of the mendicant orders, arrived shortly after. The Carmelites originated from the Carmel mountains of Northern Israel and settled in what later became known as the Syrian quarter of the city. The church was built in the 14th Century as part of a monastic complex dedicated to the Virgin Mary , hence its name. Other churches were built in the town at the same time, as Famagusta was one of the richest cities in Christendom. It was close to where the Top Guides > Churches > St Nikolas Church This is one of 3 remaining Byzantine churches in Famagusta. St Nikolas is a small double-aisled church that history has taken its toll on, although some parts still remain and are visible. The structure had 2 domes , noticeable at the top of the piers. Below the window of the dome, a visible groove indicates something was lowered from here, possibly a chandelier or maybe the church bell. Three small holes in the wall create a triangular formation and behind these are hollow spaces made of clay pots that have been built in – a technique that lightened load to make it structurally more reliable. At the same time, these pots were thought to create better acoustics , creating a more heavenly aura. If you try chanting you can judge for yourself.. Top Guides > Churches > St Simeon Church In the early 14th century, the Church of St Simeon in Famagusta was described as the metochion of a Sinai monastery. Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt , controlled by the Church of Sinai and part of the Greek Orthodox Church, owned lands in Cyprus. The Sinai founded the priory of Saint Simeon, which Pope John XXII endowed with privileges in 1334. The term metochion when used with a monastery describes a dependent of the senior monastery, almost like a child that's being given blessing and support, to develop into an autonomous monastery or society. The metochion would perhaps receive clergy from that monastery or other forms of support. St Simeon is one of 3 churches remaining in Famagusta that were built during Byzantine rule, the others being Ayia Zoni and St Nikolas. An orthodox Bishopric was established early, and the Agios Simeon became the Orthodox Cathedral when citizens of Salamis moved to Famagusta. The cathedral was cruciform in shape and would have supported a dome. There were two aisles, each with a semi-circular apse and altar, situated behind a decorated iconostasis. It's reputed that the remains of St Epiphanios, Bishop of Salamis, were once enshrined here although his remains were taken to Constantinople by Emperor Leo in the 9th century. The St George church is also attached to the north wall, dedicated to this Bishop who had gained a reputation as a defender of orthodoxy. The Orthodox community built this newer and grander church alongside the old Simeon which later became abandoned. Top Guides > Churches > The Twin Churches Among the many churches in Famagusta, these two medieval buildings have an exhilarating story. Officially named Templars Church of St John and Hospitallers Church of St John they were built alongside one another within the same century, and together are known as the Twin Churches. The larger and older of the two is the Templars and together they were the centres of the two orders in Cyprus. Also known as the Knights Templa r, they formed one of the three great military orders of knighthood, founded around 1119 to protect pilgrims on their way to the Holy Land. They quickly rose to legendary wealth and influence for two centuries. At the head of the order was the Master of the Temple at Jerusalem until 1291. With the gradual loss of their possessions in the Holy Land and the fall of the Latin kingdom, the Templars relocated their headquarters to Cyprus which they had once previously acquired from King Richard I of England in 1192. The Hospitallers were a Christian organisation founded in Jerusalem in 1080, founded by St John the Almoner of Amathus , son of the Byzantine Governor of Cyprus Epiphanios, and provided care for poor, sick or injured or injured pilgrims to the Holy Land, and soon became the other Christian force in the region. After the first Crusade it became a military order, charged with upkeep and defence of the Holy Land. They soon became the most powerful Christian groups in the area, enjoying similar privileges and prosperity to the Templars, and, like them, sought refuge in Cyprus in 1291 after the fall of Acre, the crusaders’ last Levantine bastion. After their heyday, the two famous fighting orders of the Crusaders’ period met with very contrasting fates. Following the failed papal attempt to merge them into one, the Hospitallers were able to establish a lasting rule in Rhodos , while the Templars, persecuted by Philip IV of France and Pope Clement V , were dissolved and many of them burned at stake. The Hospitallers became involved in Cypriot politics. After the Templars were dissolved, they took over their Cypriot properties. Nonetheless, they constructed their own church abutting the older church, hence the Twin Churches of Famagusta, a testimony to the two orders’ adventures in Cyprus. A later addition saw a passage built connecting the churches. Above the doorway of the Templars, you can see a small rose window and above the opposite door, the coats of arms of the Knights Hospitallers are still visible. The belfry of this church is a much later addition, dating to the 16th century. Various Byzantine frescoes from the same period can be seen to this day on these walls. These churches have been since restored and are an historic site for thousands of visitors each year. A hundred metres over from the Twin Churches is the Somineli Ev or Chimney House , a hybrid of exterior Venetian architecture meets interior Ottoman design. The building has been modified since and is used for arts and crafts exhibitions. Top

  • Nature | Whats On In TRNC

    Guides > Nature Alagadi Turtle Beach Butterflies Hunting Mushrooming Turtle Protection SPOT Audoin's Gull Carob Trees Incirli Cave Reptiles & Amphibians Water Besparmak Mountains Cumbez Tree Karpaz National Park Snakes Wild Donkeys Bird Watching Flora & Fauna Monumental Olives Tulipa Cypria Guides > Nature > Aligadi Turtle Beach Experience nature at its best Watch baby turtles hatch, or a mother turtle crawl up the beach in the middle of the night to bury her eggs in the sand. This is Alagadi Turtle Beach, near Esentepe, about 20km east of Kyrenia, and its home to two species which nest in the sand - the Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta) and the Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas ). This turtle conservation site is constantly monitored during laying and hatching seasons, as is the long stretch of sand on Golden beach in the Karpaz Peninsula and the Akamas Peninsula in the south. Female, or hen, turtles lay 70-150 eggs in the nesting season that runs from late March to early June. Once the mother’s nested, conservation efforts to protect the eggs are deployed, such as cages to prevent dogs or humans from accidentally digging them up. Incubation period depends on temperature, but is normally 50-60 days, with peak hatching between July and August. The tiny hatchlings emerge from their eggs at night and make their dangerous journey to the sea. A baby turtle is only around 4cm long and weighs just 15-20 grams. Being born at night provides them greater protection from predators such as seagulls, crabs, dogs and humans, but even so infant mortality is still extremely high, because even if they do make it to the sea they’re also food for large fish. Loggerhead turtles are thought to be one of the oldest species of turtle in the world, weighing up to 450kg. They typically have a diet of jellyfish, squid, flying fish and molluscs, and powerful jaws allow them to crush the shells of clams, crabs and mussels. Interestingly, the Loggerheads appear to be totally immune to the toxins of the Portuguese Man of War. If a Loggerhead Turtle reaches maturity, they can live to 40–65 years old, as their only real predators are sharks and boats such as fishing trawlers. A combination of instinct, moon, gravity and sea, enable a female turtle to return to lay eggs on or near the beach where she was hatched, even if she’s migrated thousands of miles throug the oceans. They used to be killed for their shells, which were used to make combs, spectacle frames and fancy boxes, but now they’re classified as an endangered species and protected. ​ The Green Sea Turtle, also known as the Black Turtle , is named not for the colour of its shell that are olive to black coloured, but from the green fat beneath its skin. It’s an herbivore, feeding in lagoons and shallows on different species of sea grass. Known for long migrations between their feeding grounds and the beaches where they hatched, they lay their eggs similar to Loggerhead Turtles and once they reach maturity, can live up to 80 years, grow to around 5 feet long, and weigh 70kg-200kg. Green Turtles used to be considered a delicacy, and were killed for their flesh, as well as their eggs, which used to be stolen from their nests, before they were added to the endangered species list. Green Turtles don’t have many predators. Only humans and larger varieties of shark feed on them, but their biggest threat is destruction of their habitats. Sandy beaches, where they’ve laid eggs for millions of year,s are slowly being destroyed to make room for development, which is why conservation areas such as Alagadi Beach are vital for their survival. Society for the Protection of Turtles (SPOT) In 1991, the Society for the Protection of Turtles (SPOT) was founded in North Cyprus. Today, Marine biology students from universities all over the world come to do their residencies at Alagadi beach. Students and volunteers monitor the turtle eggs throughout the summer season to try to protect them from predators. The beach is closed to the public at night, but you can view the turtles by booking with SPOT. A sighting isn’t guaranteed as it depends on weather and numbers, but generally mid-June to mid-July is busiest. You can do the same at other beaches such as Karşıyaka or Dipkarpaz. Night Viewing You’ll be surprised how big turtles are and you have to be very quiet so you don’t scare them. Children are allowed to come, but they must be quiet and supervised. Phones or cameras with flashes or lights aren’t allowed as these disorientate mother turtles, who go by the light of the moon to lay their eggs. Pack a beach towel or blanket to lay on, wear long trousers and warm clothes as it can get chilly, and wear trainers or good sandals as there can be uneven terrain. The walk is around 1km to the site and you can expect to be there from around 8pm until 5.30am if you’d like to stay all night, but you can leave earlier via prior arrangement. The Society for the Protection of Turtles (SPOT) was founded by British expatriates Ian and Celia Bell and local philanthropist Kutlay Keço. In 1988 a preliminary field study found nesting of green and loggerhead turtles to be significant. SPOT contacted Glasgow University and in 1992 a volunteer expedition team made a thorough survey. On the basis of this expedition, Kutlay committed to provide volunteer accommodation in Alagadi, which is still used today by the Marine Turtle Conservation Project (MTCP). MTCP continues as a collaboration between SPOT, University of Exeter’s Marine Turtle Research Group and the North Cyprus Department for Environmental Protection. Although initially established as an organisation for conserving sea turtles, today SPOT has increased its area of research and projects concerning marine life. These include: ​ Sea Turtles Monk Seals Fisheries Dolphins & Whales Sharks and Rays Bio invasives Pollution Booking Turtle watching is a great experience and should definitely be on your agenda of things to do in Northern Cyprus if you’re visiting in the summer months. You can book for individuals or groups via the SPOT website . Viewing nights are really popular, so book early. Alternatively you can visit the Alagadi site office close to the beach. Just follow the signs to the Turtle Conservation Project (AKA the Goat Shed). They’re generally open from late May to late September between 9am and 8pm. SPOT also have a Facebook page , a Twitter page and an Instagram Page , where you can find all their information. Tracking turtles - Katie’s story G055 (Katie) has been monitored since 1995, so she’s probably over 50 by now. In 1999 she was tracked to Egypt, where she seemed to be resident. In 2003 she came back to Alagadi, and was then tracked to Libya. 20 years later, in June 2022, she came back to Alagadi yet again and had a GPS transmitter and dive data logger attached, to see whether she remains faithful to her old foraging site in Libya’s Gulf of Sirte. Safe journey Katie. Can’t wait to try and meet you next time you come into Alagadi beach. Top Guides > Nature > Audoin's Gull Classified as ‘near threatened’ due to its small population, limited range and vulnerability, regions where Audoin's Gull have more than 20 nests are declared as Important Bird Areas. Although foraging grounds of Audouin’s Gull include the northwest coastlines of Africa during winter, its breeding grounds are almost entirely in the Mediterranean. Ebro Delta of Spain contains the largest colony, harbouring 67% of the breeding population worldwide. Detailed information exists about the distribution, numbers and ecology of birds breeding in the Western Mediterranean Region, but little is known about their state in the Eastern Mediterranean, including Cyprus, which hosts the eastern most breeding population known to date . The only consistent breeding region in the island is the Kleides Islands off Cape Andreas, and this population has been monitored annually since 2007.The Kleides Islands are not only a significant breeding region for the Audouin’s Gull, but also for the endangered subspecies of Shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis desmarestii) which is an endemic species to the Mediterranean. The Islands are also used by the Yellow-legged Gull (Larus michahellis) for breeding purposes. As a result, the Kleides Islands has been declared as an Important Bird Area since 2004. Each year during the breeding season, a small team visits the Kleides islets by boat, to count the number of adults and nests of Audouin’s Gulls, Yellow-legged Gull, and Mediterranean Shag, a subspecies of Shag found only in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, all of which breed there. This programme contributes data to an international Action Plan for Audouin’s Gull. Results so far suggest that the Cyprus population is decreasing, with 8-28 breeding pairs counted each year, although in different years the birds do nest in different areas on different islets (mainly on Zinaritou, Kasteletta and Kleidi rock). In 2012, for the first time ever, the gulls were also found nesting at Lefkoniso islet, on the north coast of the Karpasia peninsula, about 17km away from the Kleides archipelago. The programme will continue, to acquire a longer run of data and detect any problems with the population. ​ Since 2008, KUŞKOR has organised an annual census of birds breeding on the islands, and has observed the changes that the colonies of Audouin’s Gull have been experiencing in particular. Historically, >40 pairs bred at the site, but this has steadily fallen and in 2015 recorded the lowest numbers at a mere 8 pairs - a clear warning that the future of the species on our island is in grave danger. The loss of this colony would represent a significant range contraction. The most apparent reason for this decline is likely human disturbance by rod-fishermen using the islands. As the islands are small, even stepping on them can flush the birds and cause them to desert their nests. In the light of this, in 2014 KUŞKOR campaigned with the Turkish Cypriot authorities, and landing on the islands without a permit has now been banned by law, and there are warning signs at the most intensively used places in the region and at boat landing sites, to provide information about the ban. Further threats could also be influencing a decline in this colony including resource competition, kleptoparasitism, and predators like the Yellow Legged Gulls which share the islands. The islands are also likely ratted, which could be contributing to reduced breeding success. Overfishing may also be a factor. The impact of these threats is unknown and, along with threats from climate change, which can affect sea temperature and fish populations, and native and introduced predators, such as Peregrine Falcons, results in a need to keep the tiny population under constant surveillance. Further studies will quantify these threats and help draw up a management plan for the islands aimed at preventing the extinction of the species as a breeding bird of Cyprus. Top Guides > Nature > Besparmak Mountains Also known as the Kyrenia Mountains , this long and narrow mountain range runs for over 170 km parallel to the coast of North Cyprus. One of only two mountain ranges on the island, its highest peak is Selvili Tepe , at just over a 1,000 metres. It’s primarily made of limestone, including dolomite and marble dating to the Mesozoic period. Clothed in pine and cypress forests, including a selection of deciduous trees, Arbutus, Holm Oak, Azarolus, Fig and Walnut are all well spread and frequent. The range is an area of diverse flora , many of them endemic species. There are three main passes through which most traffic is routed, though there are other tracks used by walkers and hikers, especially the famous Besparmak Mountain Trail. In Byzantine and Lusignan times, the location of these mountains near the sea made them desirable locations for watch towers and castles to overlook the coast and central plain. Castles sat astride of peaks during the Middle Ages that today attract thousands of visitors each year, namely St Hilarion, Buffavento and Kantara. Despite its relatively low altitude, it still provides an effective barrier between the Mesarya Plain and the northern coastline, preventing harsh winds from drying the fertile soil that fills this agricultural area. Winter rain irrigates the plain and the porous limestone provides an excellent filter for the water that’s preserved in mountain aquifers that provides water for nearly all the towns and villages in North Cyprus. An abundance of fire breakers run alongside the mountain slopes, established after a destructive forest fire in 1996 which continued for three days and destroyed a large part of the Kyrenia forestry and habitat. A giant flag of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus is also painted on the southern slope of these mountains. At 425 metres wide and 250 metres high, this flag can be seen from miles south and is illuminated at night. The Besparmak’s most distinguishing feature is a peak that resembles five fingers with many legends explaining how this came about. The Legendary Tales A long time ago a pretty girl lived in a village on the outskirts of Kyrenia. Two men were very much in love with this dame, but only one would receive her affection. One’s heart was made of gold, the other’s was full of evil. Tired of trying to outwit one another for her heart, the men decided to settle for a duel in a close by marshland. The malevolent man quickly wounded the other and threw his opponent into the swamp. He was quickly dragged down but somehow managed to drag his opponent in as well so that both were buried alive. The gentle man however was entombed with his left fist tightly quenched above the mud, yearning in desperation his love would save him. When the marshy area dried out, the man’s hand turned into the mountains and today, we can see his knuckles and five fingers on the Besparmak range. ​ A gutsy villager fell in love with the local Queen and asked for her hand in marriage. For most this would stay an unrequited love, but the villager confronted the Queen nonetheless. The Queen wished to be rid of the rude man and requested that he bring her some water from the spring of Apostolos Andreas Monastery in the Karpaz, quite a risky journey in those days, deemed an almost impossible mission. The man set off and after several weeks returned with the precious water, much to the dismay of the Queen. Although he had succeeded the Queen still refused to marry him. In a fit of rage, he poured the water on to the earth, seized a handful of the resulting mud and threw it at the Queen’s head. She dodged the lump of mud which sailed far across the land all the way to the top of the Kyrenia mountain range, where it is to this day, still showing the impression of the thwarted villager’s five fingers, or a representation of the heartbroken villager’s disappointment. Another famous tale is of the Byzantine hero Digenis Akritas . Tradition has it that the bold warrior leapt across the sea from Anatolia in a magnificent attempt to save Cyprus from the Saracen invaders. Hand gripping the mountain to get out of the sea, it's his heroic handprint in the mountains. ​ According to another legend, the gnarled massif was formed millions of years ago when the world was peopled by giants . A giant aiming a handful of rocks at his opponent, missed their target and the rocks landed on the hillside, forming the limestone five-finger ridge. Top Guides > Nature > Bird Watching Northern Cyprus is home to around 347 different species of birds, 7 of which are unique to the country. The twice-yearly arrival of migrating birds adds to the unique pleasure of bird watching, with visiting birds heading north from March to May, and south between August and October. Visitors include Swallows, Swifts, Hoopoe, Masked Shrike and Little Ringed Plovers. There are birds that migrate specifically for breeding purposes, and the island is used as a convenient stopping off post for many species in transit to other lands. Learn more about Birds of Northern Cyprus . ​ Some great places to go bird watching in North Cyprus include: Wetlands around Famagusta Tip of the Karpaz Peninsula Kaplica beach coastal area Various Reservoirs Kyrenia Mountain Range Kaylar and surrounding area Mia Milia Sewage Treatment Plant area Inonu and surrounding area ​ Mountain Bird Watching One of the best places to watch birds is in the Kyrenia Mountains, where the pines and cypress trees teem with birds. Kantara Castle offers a picturesque spot to observe both resident and migrant birds, including the Blue Rock Thrush, Spectacled Warbler, the resident Cyprus Warbler and Wheatear, and Black-Headed Bunting. Alpine Swifts can be seen darting around their nests, perched on the cliffs around the castle. ​ North Cyprus Griffon Vulture The Griffon Vulture still soars above Kantara and St Hilarion in the Kyrenia Mountains, riding the winds on its 2m wingspan. Birds of prey numbers have been affected by hunting but it’s still possible to see buzzards and falcons, and nesting pairs of red kite can be spotted around the Lapta area. Other hunters include scops owl and little owls. The reservoirs at Köprülü and Gonyeli attract overwintering duck, herons and grebes, which in turn attract birds of prey to feast on them. ​ Karpas peninsula bird watching This peninsula juts out eastwards from the north coast, pointing towards the Turkish mainland. It’s a major stopping point for many migratory birds where you can spot Golden Orioles and Bee-eaters. The Rollers always provide a great display, as they bounce across the countryside in their trademark jerky flight pattern. At the far end of the Karpas peninsula, the Klidhes Islands provide refuge for sea birds such as Audouin’s Gulls, Cormorants and Shags. During March and April, the islands are also home to breeding Peregrine Falcons, audaciously fast hunters who snatch birds from the sky as food for their offspring. The peninsula is also home to two game birds, the Francolin and Chikor, both types of partridge. Bird Society (Kuşkor) The North Cyprus Society for the Protection of Birds (Kuşkor) has been active since 1988 and works for the welfare of all birds and holds regular education programmes for adults and children alike. Kuşkor work hard to protect and conserve the breeding and migrant bird populations of Northern Cyprus at a time when natural habitat is dwindling through human development and the numbers of birds are depleting due to hunting, poisoning, changes in land use and climate change. ​ The Kuşkor ringing scheme. Mark and recapture or resight is one of the fundamental methodologies in the field of biological sciences and is applied to bird populations throughout the world as a tool for identifying species structures, taxonomy, demography and movements. In 2001 the Kuşkor Ringing Scheme was founded by Kuşkor officials and qualified British ringers. In 2015 Kuşkor became a member of the European Union for Bird Ringing (EURING). Adopting British Trust for Ornithology conventions and regulations and British-sourced metal rings headed ‘Kuşkor North Cyprus’, the Kuşkor scheme has welcomed qualified ringers who have been trapping birds at sites across Northern Cyprus, assisted by resident ecologists. Cyprus is at the heart of the vast Eastern Mediterranean flyway and has resident, passage migrant, migrant breeding and wintering populations of birds about which relatively little is known, which makes them perfect subjects for ringing studies. As well as adding significantly to our general understanding of birds at the study sites, ringing-based articles from Kuşkor ringers have been published on the breeding Eurasian Reed Warbler, Nightingale and Cyprus Warbler and the presence of the scheme has continued to give focus to avian conservation issues in Northern Cyprus. ​ Karpasia Peninsula - Kleides Islands The remote, relatively un-spoilt and picturesque Karpasia Peninsula, with its rolling hills, juniper-dominated shrubland and low-intensity farmland is one of the outstanding IBAs in Cyprus, important for its characteristic Mediterranean bird community. The site is also an Endemic Bird Area, and significant for no fewer than 4 species of global conservation concern, like the Roller and the Audouin’s Gull. The rocky Kleides islands and the islet of Lefkoniso are the only breeding sites in Cyprus for this gull species. ​ Pentadaktylos Mountains This site encompasses most of the Pentadaktylos range, which stretches along the north coast of the island. The steep slopes of the range are sparsely vegetated on the southern face but covered in scrub and mixed forest of pine and cypress on the wetter north-facing slopes. The site is of importance for many breeding forest birds including the Black-headed Bunting and the Bonelli’s Eagle and for its characteristic Mediterranean bird community. It's an Endemic Bird Area site, with significant populations of the endemic Cyprus Wheatear and Cyprus Warbler. ​ Kormakitis Peninsula On the north-west of the island, Kormakitis Peninsula with its rocky coastline, extensive areas of low scrub, patches of lowland pine forest and low-intensity cereal-growing land, is of importance for passing waterbirds along its coastline and for breeding birds, like the Nightjar and the two endemics. ​ Mia Milia Sewage Treatment Plant A man-made set of sewage treatment pools and surrounding agricultural land on the outskirts of Nicosia. The site attracts breeding waders and has regularly attracted small but significant numbers of the globally threatened White-headed Duck in winter. ​ Mesaoria Plain This extensive site captures an important part of the central Mesaoria plain and is almost entirely dominated by cereal fields. Though more intensively managed and man-dominated than most other IBAs, it is the top breeding site on the island for three species typical of open, flat and dry landscapes: Stone Curlew, Crested Lark and Calandra Lark. ​ Famagusta Lakes An extensive though fragmented complex of fresh and brackish marshes and pools on the outskirts of Famagusta town, the site attracts a wide range of waterbirds, notably breeding Black-winged Stilt and Spur-winged Lapwing. The lakes are also the only known breeding site for Glossy Ibis in Cyprus. ​ Other bird watching sites in North Cyprus Cape Andrea’s (Zafer) Avtepe / Kuruova area The north cost around Kaplica Tuzluca Marsh Silver Beach Akova Reservoir Demirhan pools Akdeniz Reservoir Cape Koruçam Geçitköy Reservoir Acapulco and Arapköy Reservoir Haspolat The Five Fingers Mountain and Herbarium ​ Wild Birds Found in Northern Cyprus Top Guides > Nature > Butterflies Butterflies indicate a healthy environment, and are generally described as the essence of freedom, peace and nature. Northern Cyprus is famed for rural diversity, the beauty of which acts as one of the main draws to this jewel in the Mediterranean. From stunning mountain ranges to powder soft beaches, the landscape is as picturesque as it is varied. Little wonder then that Northern Cyprus attracts thousands of holiday makers year upon year. The very same reason that it’s loved by an altogether different breed of visitor...the humble butterfly. Northern Cyprus acts as a resting point for over 50 different species as they make their yearly pilgrimage. Hundreds upon millions of butterflies migrate each year, flooding the skies with colour while navigating their way, ensure their continuing survival. Fully grown butterflies appear in February in coastal areas such as Kyrenia and Famagusta. They’re on the wing until May in lowland areas, and at the beginning of July appear in mountain areas. Butterfly watching is a growing hobby in North Cyprus for nature lovers, who find, identify and record their behaviour. It’s particularly amazing on the Five Finger Mountains and Alevkaya areas, where you’re likely to see Cyprus Grayling and Cyprus Meadow Brown . You can also spot gorgeous butterflies in bushes, nearby flowers or shady locations. If you take a stroll through the Alevkaya forest between May and September, you may have the unique chance to see the wonderful Hermit and Eastern Rock Grayling . ​ One of the most easily recognisable visitors, is the Vanessa Cardui or Painted Lady. This particular species, distinguishable by its warm orange wings, edged in black and spotted with white polka dots, has an impressive wingspan of up to 9cm. During March this delicate creature travels up to 15,000 kilometres from is wintering locations in Africa, through the Mediterranean and onto Europe before making the return trip in Autumn. Several varieties of butterfly are endemic to Northern Cyprus, which means that these beautiful insects can be appreciated throughout all four seasons. The Paphos Blue or Glaucopsyche Paphos is one of the island’s permanent residents and unmistakable due to its blue wings. February sees adult butterflies start to emerge in coastal regions and are visible on the wing until June. The Levantine Leopard or Apharitis Acamas appears in June and is a rare and spectacular sight. With wings bearing a distinctive leopard print on the underside, edged in a fine line of silver scales, these delicate wings hold a secret only revealed in the sunlight. Each hind wing possesses two tails, the larger of which is painted with an area of blue and only visible when the light hits it. Most commonly seen between April and October at all altitudes, is the Cyprus Meadow Brown or Maniola Cypricola . A lover of fragrant herbs such as thyme, the females have wings painted on the upper side in shades of amber and yellow, with a distinctive jet-black eye spot. Interestingly, the males of the species are less boldly marked. Another butterfly that enjoys the warmth of the Northern Cyprus climate is the Vanessa Atalanta , or Red Admiral. Easily recognised by its black velvet wings, intersected by striking red bands and specks of bright white, this specific butterfly is fiercely territorial. So much so, that females will only mate with males that hold territory. Unusual in the fact that this butterfly is regarded as ‘people-friendly’, the Red Admiral is only too happy to use humans as a comfortable perch to rest on, just one more reason to make Northern Cyprus your holiday destination. Top Guides > Nature > Carob Trees Carob has been cultivated in Cyprus since the 1st century and was one of the island’s major exports from the medieval era right up to the end of British rule. The carob (harnup), is a flowering evergreen tree or shrub in the legume family, Fabaceae, that can reach 10 metres in height and has a broad thick-bowed crown. It’s widely cultivated for its edible pods, but also has many other uses. Although native to the Mediterranean region and the Middle East, it's also found in North America. It’s usually planted together in mixed cultures with olives, pruned and grafted at an early stage. ​ History As Kyrenia region harvested over a quarter of the island’s carob tree pods, Kyrenia Harbour became the centre for its trade, and harbour-front buildings were used as warehouses to store the carob harvest before it was packed into hessian sacks and shipped out to Europe, where it was fed to cattle, sheep and horses. The trade of this cash ​ crop was very profitable for the island and helped to produce such abundant wealth it was named the “Cyprus Black Gold ”. Although the international carob trade collapsed in the 1960s, it continues to be harvested by local farmers. Carob Tree The best carob growing areas are within the Kyrenia mountain range, and can be found anywhere, whether it be dry or stony terrain, to 600 metres above sea level. Its leaves are pinnate, smooth-edged leathery leaflets, dark green to russet in colour. The tree produces clusters of long pods, which in early growth resemble a curved goat’s horn, hence referred to locally as keçiboynuz. It blossoms in July to October, when the catkins appear hanging from mature branches. By the end of the summer the mature pods are 10-30 cm long and flat. During ripening, these gradually turn to a rich dark brown colour and before the pod dries out in the summer heat, it's harvested. ​ Modern Day Uses Carob is a feed substance that's highly nutritious and full of sugar, so in addition to being used for animal fodder it has other domestic uses. Carob pods are naturally sweet, not bitter, and contain no theobromine or caffeine. The carob tree fruit is widely used in medicine, as it's rich in such vitamins as A, B, B2, B3 and D . The ripe, dried, and sometimes toasted pod, is often ground into carob powder, which is sometimes used to replace cocoa powder. Carob bars are an alternative to chocolate bars and are globally available in health and vegan food stores. However, the local pekmez (molasses) condiment, produced by boiling carob powder into a reduction, is a healthy favourite found in all supermarkets. The carob is also an excellent source of firewood, and the resin extracted from the seeds is used in cosmetics, paper and textile industries.You can just enjoy eating the fresh dark-brown pods itself, filled with natural honey-like juices and enjoyed by many other mammals alike. ​ Landscaping The carob tree is widely cultivated in the horticultural nursery industry as an ornamental plant for Mediterranean climates and other temperate regions around the world, and is especially popular in California and Hawaii. It's very drought tolerant, and if the size of the fruit harvest is not of importance, it can be used in xeriscaping designs for gardens, parks, and public municipal and commercial landscapes. Carats The carat (the unit of measurement for the size of diamonds and other gemstones), is based on the weight of a carob bean, which is remarkably consistent from pod to pod and tree to tree. There are records of carob beans being used to weigh gems as early as Roman times, and it's thought that the word carat actually derived from these pods. Top Guides > Nature > Cumbez Tree In Famagusta town centre lies this colossal ancient tree. Outside Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque , this tree according to botanists, was planted at the time when building of the original St Nicholas Cathedral structure commenced, making it over 720 years of age , and the oldest living tree on the island. The tree has many names, including Ficus sycomorus,(sycamore fig) or the Fig-mulberry as its’ leaves resemble those of the mulberry, but locals refer to it simply as the “Cumbez”. ​ The Cumbez is native to Africa south of the Sahel and north of the Tropic of Capricorn, and is a tropical fig species that has been cultivated since ancient times. The main trunk of the tree is surrounded by smaller trunks springing up from the massive root system, which have grown into the main one, providing it added support. According to local folklore, there are seven trunks round the main trunk, each representing every 100 years of its past. In the Bible, the sycomore is referred to seven times in the Old Testament and once in the New Testament. This monumental tree is what botanists call simple deciduous. Its' leaves will have all but disappeared in the winter giving the illusion that the tree has died, yet in a month, towards the beginning of spring, all the leaves cover the whole tree with dense green foliage, throwing a magnificent shade over the courtyard of the cathedral converted mosque, welcoming travellers visiting during the hot summer days. The Cumbez is the oldest living thing in Cyprus and what a story it's witnessed – Lusignan knights, Venetian builders, Ottoman sieges, earthquakes, and only the tree knows what more. It’s listed under the Department of Culture’s National Heritage List and is protected by the Department of Forestry Famagusta Office. Top Guides > Nature > Flora & Fauna Springtime is by far the time best viewing season with 100+ Cyprus endemic species and 19 North Cyprus endemics to discover . Crocus, cyclamen and muscari do bloom during the winter months, but late February to end of April are best months for seeing Cyprus in bloom. The flora depends on how much rain fell in winter, as the heat from April onwards brings an end to blooming wildflowers. ​ Flowers The first colour of Spring is the bright yellow of the Oxalis pes-caprae . An agricultural nuisance but a welcome splash of colour, this is soon followed by the anemones in white, pale mauve, blue and red, and after them come some of the Ophrys and Orchis species such as Ophrys fusca (the Brown Bee Orchid) and Orchis morio (Green-winged Orchis), which are widespread and can be found in the pine forests and on rocky hillsides. The Mandrake (Mandragora officinarum) has flowers in the white to dark blue spectrum, and grows as a flat cluster of broad green leaves with the flowers nestling in the middle. It can easily be seen along road-sides and on many of the ancient sites. The Crown Daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium), est of the island. covers the fields and verges with pale orange, bathing the countryside in sunshine. As the weather starts to get warmer, the most colourful of the Spring flowers clothe the scene. Asphodels, Calendula and three varieties of Cistus (Cistus creticus, Cistus parviflorus and Cistus salviifolius) produce a host of shades. The giant fennel (Ferrula communis) is an inedible plant and grows unchecked in fields and mountains. It grows to a height in excess of 2m with a feathery leaf, used by the local florists in flower arrangements. With many heads of bright yellow flowers, towering over all other species it’s unmissable. The vibrant blues of the anchusas (Anchusa azurea), tall, bright and hairy, and Anchusa undulata, low growing, dark blue almost purple), mix with the paler blue of the Dyer’s alkanet (Alkanna Lehmanii), and the equally colourful echiums, (Echium angustifolium, narrow-leaved Bugloss, and Echium plantagineum, viper’s Bugloss). Flowering from February to May are the ranunculus that grow in the foothills of the mountains. The turban buttercup or Persian crowfoot (Ranunculus Asiaticus), grow in a variety of colours from cream to yellow, deep scarlet, and white flashed with red. Though similar, they’re not to be confused with the anemones that share the same habitat. The common pink corn flag (Gladiolus italicus) can be found in the corn fields as can the Cyprus black tulip (Tulipa cypria), not truly black but very dark red. The Arabian sun rose (Fumana Arabica)and the endemic Cyprus sun rose (Helianthemum obtusifolium) favour the same habitat and are very similar, with papery thin yellow petals, growing in rocky terrain they flower from February to May. North Cyprus is also well known for its tulips, and a Tulip Festival is held yearly in Tepebaşı which is a village located between Kyrenia and Güzelyurt on the north west of the island. ​ Orchids North Cyprus is home to around 30 different orchids, all of which are protected species, with the Ophrys Kotscdhyi variety only growing in Cyprus. You can join walking tours specifically tailored to see some of the varieties growing on the island. Mixed in with the orchids, you’ll see brilliant splashes of colour after the rainy season, with poppies and cyclamen mixed with crocus and cyntius. Trees Olive trees are another feature of North Cyprus, with destruction of these ancient trees completely illegal. In the autumn you’ll often see families out on their land, shaking olives from trees and taking them to be pressed for oil. Other North Cyprus trees include the jacaranda with its beautifully coloured bark; the wonderfully scented frangipani and jasmine; the purple flowering Judas tree; delicate pepper trees; and the staples of almond and carob trees which litter the gardens of many . Fig and mulberry trees are also common. ​ Citrus Trees Around November, you’ll regularly see orange, lemon and grapefruit trees bursting with fruit. There’s three types of oranges grown in North Cyprus, and each has a specific purpose and many people still have them growing in their gardens. Pomegranates are also grown. ​ Ranunculus Asiaticus (Turban Buttercup, Persian Crowfoot) The Turban Buttercup is a perennial with sparingly branched stems up to 30 cm high, bearing bright flowers of many colour forms, from white to cream, yellow to orange, flame to scarlet, salmon pink , deep salmon pink, carmine and many amalgamations of these. These beautiful flowers have many different colours, which makes spotting them exciting. For the complete novice, identifying them can be confusing, because at first sight they’re not unlike Crown Anemones. The quickest way to differentiate between them is to be sure that there are green sepals below the petals; there’s no green bract wrapped around the stem under the flower. Habitat: Rocky or grassy hillsides, pastures, roadsides, in ditches, foot-hills of the Kyrenia range on open scree below the north face; sea-level to 2,200 feet alt. Flowers from February to May. Cyclamen Cyprium (Cyprus or Autumn Cyclamen) Flower stalk slender c.10 cm high erect bronze/purple, bearing a sweet-scented flower in the autumn before leaves appear. Petals white or very pale pink with conspicuous deep magneta (noses) blotch M-shaped where they turn sharply up/back; after flowering the stalks curve down forming small tight "springs" bearing a seeding-box (you can pull gently on the coil and feel the spring-tension which pushes the ovary against the ground, enabling ants to carry away the seeds); seed coat dark brown, rough, very sticky when newly shed. Leaves spade-shaped, fleshy grey-green, marbled; leaf underside rich purple or crimson. Tubers with rough greyish bark, about 7 cm diameter or less; roots appear from one side of lower surface. Habitat:Shaded calcareous or ingenious rocks, on steep hillsides, banks, under shrubs or trees; sea-level to 3,000 ft alt. ​ Anemone Coronaria (Crown Anemone) This is one of the most memorable and beautiful Mediterranean plants because of its brightly-coloured flowers, which are among the first to appear in the early spring (although exceptionally bad storms of rain or hail and cold winds have been known to retard the flowering time until the sun encourages them to appear). Flower stems 10-30 cm high, bearing a solitary flower head, leaf-like twice cut into narrow segments. Flowers large, 4-8 cms across, without green sepals, which distinguishes it clearly from the Asiatic Buttercup; 5-8 oval petals, in lavender, lilac, deep purple, red to scarlet, rose-pink, magneta, and more rarely white, blue or in many and various intermediate shades, sometimes two-coloured, with a white or pale base; even the white have a circle of white in the area near the stamens (the white petals make this circle more difficult to see, but caught in the sun at certain angle the white circle shines silvery-white or white). The red form and the shades of purple are the most widespread, but it is very exciting to find the rarer pale apricot pink and the deep salmon pink. Fruiting heads become taller and more cylindrical as the petals fade. Stamens numerous; filaments pink, violet or red; anthers purplish or black; styles threadlike 1-2 mm long, blackish. Torus ovoid; nutlets densely woolly. Leaves broadly triangular, 3-12 cm across, divided into 3 triangular, stalked, pinnatifid or deeply divided segments, ultimate divisions narrow, variously toothed; stalks 3-7 cm long. Habitat:Habitat of both normal and dwarf forms (var. parviflora) with just as many brilliant colours, but with flowers no larger than a lady's small watch-face, open spaces, grassy slopes and hillsides, in cultivated and fallow fields, by roadsides; sea-level to 2,900 ft alt. on the Kyrenia range, near Five Finger mountains and across from the south face towards the Nicosia road. Flowers from December to April. Narcissus Serotinus (Late Narcissus) Small perennial with ovoid bulb 1.5-3 cm long, with a thick papery dark brown covering. One or two flowers on slender green stems (with tendency to coil or curve); flowers fragrant, with perianth tube narrow, pale green; petals white, apex rounded to slightly pointed; corona very small, with six semi-circular orange lobes, only 1 mm long. Capsule 1 cm long. Leaves only 1-2, very slender, usually appearing after flowering. Habitat:Shallow soil over rocks, open areas; sea-level to 800 ft alt. Flowers October to early December. ​ Crocus Veneris [var. Cyprium (Cyprus or Autumn Crocus) Perennial herb with a corm, in flower 4-8 cm high. Flowers 1-2, fragrant; six white segments, often with a violet stripe or feathering on the outside of the outer three. Leaves 3-4, equalling the flower in height, but occasionally with only the tips showing; up to 1 mm wide, bright dark green, with a narrow silvery median stripe on the upper surface. Habitat: Stony and grassy places in maquis or open conifer woods; 300-2,500 ft alt. Flowers November to January. ​ Tulipa Cypria (Cyprus or Black Tulip) This tulip appears to be bright scarlet, but in normal reflected light resembles its common name - Black Tulip. (Note that the scarlet flower with yellow inside is considered by botanists to be a distinct species, Tulipa Agenensis). The cup or the solitary head, has 6 oval petals with pointed tips, the black basal blotch on each petal being only slightly bordered by yellow; stamens thick and sturdy, with bright yellow polen borne on dark red oblong anthers; stigmas creamy, conspicuous on top of the ovary. Stalk 30 cm high, pale yellow-green. Leaves at bases spreading sideways, about 20 cm long, grey-green with undulating margins; those part-way up the stem smaller, narrower and sharply-pointed. Habitat: Mostly in cereal fields, hidden below the level of the wheat, but in great numbers. Flowers Mar-Apr. Helianthemum Obtusifolium (Yellow Cyprus Sun Rose) Straggling shrublet with branches to 25 cm long, growing on stony ground; flower-buds hairy, purple-black striped with two outer sepals and 3 inner broader ones like pointed spades; 5 pale yellow petals 15 mm long; stamens 4 mm long with distinct oblong anthers which show clearly in the open-plan arrangements of the stamens. Habitat: Dry rocky hillsides in garigue; sea-level to 3,000 ft alt. Flowers February to May. 5 Flowers that Solely Grow in Cyprus Officially, there are 140 recorded endemic plants that only grow on the island. Here’s 5 to for you to admire. If you find yourself out in nature, by all means look for them but don’t pick them as you might be putting the species in danger. Tulipa Cypria Commonly known as the Cyprus Tulip, the Tulipa Cypria is one of the rarest flowers of the island, making it difficult to stumble upon, but an exciting occasion if you do! Considered a strictly protected species, this tulip flowers during the months of March and April. The Cyprus Tulip is small in size, growing up to 15-40 centimetres high, while its particularity is its two larger leaves at the lower end of its stem. Its striking dark, blood-red colour makes it hard to miss! ​ Bosea Cypria In full bloom from April until July, this evergreen shrub can be seen in abundance hanging on the side of cliffs, stone walls or even trees and it’s usually found not too far away from the sea level. Prevalent in the Akamas Nature reserve in the Paphos region, the shrub isn’t hard to miss with its bright red berries! ​ Alyssum Akamasicum The Alyssum Akamasicum borrowed its name from ‘Akamas’, the notable natural reserve in the Paphos region where it can be found. Notably, there are 11 locations where it can be seen in the Paphos region only. Known to grow close to the sea level, researchers believe that there are only about 3,000 of its kind in the area, justifying its listing as a vulnerable species. ​ Ophrys Kotschyi Known as the Cyprus Bee Orchid, the Ophrys kotschyi has 3 subspecies to its name, 1 of them being native to Cyprus. Prevalent in grasslands and open pine woodlands, this beautiful and distinctive orchid is listed as ‘near threatened’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. ​ Cyclamen Cyprium The Cyclamen Cyprium is also known as the Cyprus Cyclamen. It is the national flower of the island. Flowering from November to March, the Cyprus cyclamen likes to grow in the mountainous regions. Its leaves are heart shaped with rigged edges, while its petals are pale pink with magenta streaks on the edges. ​ Herbarium If you’re interested in the flora of North Cyprus, then the Herbarium is well worth a visit. You’ll find it in the Alevkaya Forest Station on the mountain ridge between Esentepe and Degirmenlik and it has over 1,200 native plant species. ​ Illustrated Guide North Cyprus is a fantastic place to view hundreds of different types of flora and flowers and “An Illustrated Flora of North Cyprus ” by Dr Deryck Viney, is an invaluable guide for amateurs and professionals alike if you want to become even more familiar. Top Guides > Nature > Hunting Love it or hate it, Cyprus has had a culture of hunting for generations. Hunting season is normally between September and October. Hunters can use dogs to hunt game such as pheasant, snipe, quail, crow, magpie, and rabbit . It's absolutely prohibited to shoot any bird that isn't on the list issued to hunters, especially birds of prey. Hunting for small game doesn't allow dogs and is mainly for smaller migratory bird species. ​ The Game and Wild Bird Law Covers Hunting Season, Hunting Animals, Hunting Regions and Hunting Days. North Cyprus has its own Hunting Federation who oversee and govern hunters and the issuing of licences. They're also involved in breeding programmes to replenish stock and conduct patrols, to ensure hunters are compliant with the laws. Over recent years environmental groups, biologist groups and the public, have voiced concerns about decimation of wildlife, the rise in the number of illegal hunters being caught and the use of illegal hunting methods to trap song birds. Hunting will always be a sensitive issue, but other detrimental effects on the natural habitat are also to blame for decreases in bird population, such as major road building projects and prolific property development. In addition to permanent game protection zones and no hunting zones, it's forbidden to hunt, kill, catch or chase any game or wild birds in the following areas: ​ 500 meters or closer to dams and ponds 300 meters or closer to picnic areas 300 meters or closer to Eleousa Monastery 200 meters or closer to residential areas 200 meters or closer to the Tashkent Nature Park 200 meters or closer to the Central Prison buildings 200 meters or closer to Haspolat Treatment Plants 200 meters or closer of all shooting ranges 200 meters or closer to the new Ercan Airport runway construction 200 meters or closer to universities 200 meters or closer to formalized corral areas 200 meters or closer to Muratağa, Atlılar and Sandallar martyrdoms and massacre pits 100 meters or closer to the Animal Waste Storage Area The TRNC Flag drawn on the rocks over the Tashkent village 200 meters or closer to the adjacent meteorological station Top Guides > Nature > Incirli Cave Within a hill near the tiny village of Cinarli, sits the largest cave on the island . Taking its name from a nearby fig tree, Incirli Cave is a naturally formed gypsum cave located about 2km to the northeast of Cinarli, containing a fascinating collection of stalagmites and stalactites. To better understand the speleology of Incirli, (the study or exploration of caves), here's some key words to get your head around. ​ Gypsum : A soft sulphate mineral that's widely mined and used as a fertilizer and the main constituent in many forms of plaster, blackboard chalk and dry wall. Stalactites : Icicle-shaped formations with pointed tips, that hang down from the ceiling of a cave. Produced from water dripping through the cave ceiling. Stalagmite: Upward-growing mound of mineral deposits made from water dripping onto the floor of a cave. Most have rounded or flattened tips. ​ The Cave Incirli cave is a fascinating collection of stalagmites and stalactites. Hidden away off a signed beaten track, the entrance to this amazing cave is so small that you'd hardly know it was there if it weren't for the nearby symbolic fig (Turkish: incir) tree. Two flights of steps take you down into the widest and longest part of the cave. The only known developed gypsum topography cave in Northern Cyprus or Türkiye, it's very well illuminated for visitors with hand rails to make it easy to make your way through. Lined with unique cauliflower shaped structures formed out of the white mineral, coarse stalactites hang from the ceiling whilst smooth stalagmites rise from the ground. Columns extending to the ceiling and sandstone rock formations add to the beauty. The air inside is dry and refreshing and the rocks will remind you of coral. The cave extends to a depth of about 250 metres. It's 5-10 metres wide at points, and 4-7 metres high, which is said to change according to the phases of the moon. Towards the end, the passageway narrows and sharply turns, providing a maze-like tour, with small corridors branching off into darkened nooks and rock formations swept upwards in exquisite curves. ​ Legendary Tales A long time ago, there were three thieves who hid their stolen goats in this cave. Villagers followed the footprints of the animals all the way to the fig tree where they mysteriously disappeared. After days of patrolling the area and with the help of local police, they laid an ambush which led to the discovery of the cave entrance nearby. As they watched the thieves enter the cave at midnight, they guarded the entrance until sunlight to make their move. Entering the cave the next morning, they were shocked to find no trace of the thieves nor the animals. Rumour has it the thieves escaped from a second entrance, close to the village of Altinova, some distance from Cinarli – this entrance is still waiting to be rediscovered to this day. In the 1950’s and 1960’s this cave was also known to be used as a hideout for nationalist guerrillas that fought a campaign for the end of British rule. Getting There The village, also referred to as ‘Platani’ and ‘Bladan’, is in the foothills of the Besparmak Mountains, famous for its organic honey and accessible from all directions. From Kyrenia, drive east along the coast towards Tatlisu and you'll see a sign post which will take you along a stony, windy road for about 4 km until you get to the car park. If you prefer, you can bypass this first sign and carry on a few kilometres where you'll see a second sign which takes you there via a much easier tarmac road. From Famagusta or Nicosia, the road bypassing Gecitkale towards the coast will take you directly to this second sign. A more scenic countryside stretching from Iskele via Sinirustu is yet another course to this remarkable site but the roads are simle to say the least. There is a car park and a ticket office office where you can buy some water or take a toilet break if required. The fig tree at the entrance that this cave takes its name from, has fruits believed to have healing powers. If you visit in the peak of summer you may find some to pick from the lower branches, assuming you beat the locals to it. Caves were amongst the earliest forms of shelter for mankind and one of the first places where humans began to pictorially depict their world around, in wall inscriptions and paintings. The Incirli cave is a fine example of the mysterious and astonishing world that caves represent for the curious and intrepid explorer. Top Guides > Nature > Karpaz National Park Jutting out into the Mediterranean Sea’s easternmost reaches, the Karpaz Peninsula, otherwise known as the “Panhandle ”, is a welcome diversion from the hustle and bustle of everyday life further inland. Almost 80 km from one end to the other, this peninsula is perhaps the Mediterranean’s last piece of unspoilt tranquillity, where green and azure meets history. Sparsely populated, with a wealth of deserted golden sand, life’s a beach here. Crop farmers, still relying on archaic horse-drawn implements, cheerily go about their work, while the Cyprus donkey roams freely in abundance. Along with multiple amphibians, reptiles and birds passing through on their migration routes, loggerhead and green sea turtles are also proud to regard this unspoilt stretch of land as home, sensing idyllic nesting grounds when they see them. From here, Maquis, Cypress and Pine trees pepper the countryside and scurry up hills to altitudes of around 1,000 metres, comprising a handsome backdrop to the serene sapphire blue of the gently caressing ocean. The surrounding waters have a wonderful clarity, ideal for snorkellers while those of a less intrepid nature may opt for a spot of fishing instead. Blessed with a biodiversity so rich, the entire area has been rightfully deemed a national reserve. The architectural eye candy includes several ruins, Kantara Castle and the Monastery of Apostolos Andreas, dedicated to Saint Andrew. The peninsula has lonely white sandy beaches, including the famous Golden Beach. Natural sanctuary The main reason for making Karpaz a conservation area is its natural flora and fauna. It's home to many endemic and protected species. Plant species number about 1,600 (22 endemic), bird species about 350 (7 endemic) and 26 reptile and amphibian species, so the biological diversity is especially rich. ​ Plant species Springtime sees colourful flowers like anemones, turban buttercups, poppies and gladioli. Although the area was cultivated with tomatoes, bananas and fruit trees, the "terra rossa" soil derived from limestone, red in colour due to the iron compounds, hosts orchids and lime-loving plants as well. The area on the whole is a landscape of rolling hills and grain fields, partly domesticated with vineyards, tobacco fields, olive or carob trees. Up to an altitude of 1,000 metres the hills are covered with pines, cypress and maquis vegetation. Wildlife Karpaz peninsula is one of the main migration stops for birds between Eastern Europe and Africa with around 300 species, amounting to millions of birds following this route in early spring and late summer. The remotest tip of the Karpaz, the Klídhes islands, allows sea birds such as Shag or Audouin's Gull to nest undisturbed. The cliffs provide secure strongholds for nesting Peregrine Falcons, as well as Doves and Pigeons. About 46 sandy beaches in the Karpaz are natural habitats and the main nestling ground to loggerhead ( Caretta caretta ) and green sea turtles ( Chelonia mydas ) who come to lay eggs on sandy beaches east of Cape Plakotí. Cyprus donkeys live freely in the Karpaz national park. Generally black, sometimes ginger, approach them with care. ​ Life in Karpaz Almost free from heavy population and industry, the region is one of the least polluted in the European Mediterranean. Fishing is the main industry of the countryside, with Bogaz and Kumyali the most important fishing villages. Many tourists visit to have a trip, admire the abandoned civilization of Byzantine churches, or just enjoy the nature and wide sandy beaches. Among the historical sights is Apostolos Andreas Monastery, a popular meeting point of many worshippers and visitors at the very tip of the Karpaz peninsula. Top Guides > Nature > Monumental Olive Trees Think of the Mediterranean and you'll picture perfect coastlines, spectacular mountainsides and landscapes lined with olive trees. The “Monumental Olive Trees ” may not be the first attraction you consider visiting in Northern Cyprus, but these gifts of mother nature are certainly overwhelming. Located in the village of Kalkanli on the North West coast, just outside Guzelyurt , these are the most ancient olive trees in Northern Cyprus, believed to have been planted in the 11th century Lusignan period. Some 2,000 colossal trees over 700 years in age , this area is one of the most important projects in the Natura 2000 initiative under EU protection. The area is a living cultural and natural heritage and makes a very popular attraction. If you enjoy nature and unique sights, these majestic trees in the wilderness are definitely a must-do on the list. ​ Usually on the last Sunday of March, the annual “Kalkanli Monumental Olive Trees Walk” is held with the aim of promoting olive trees and their importance to Northern Cyprus and Turkish Cypriot cultural heritage alike. Think of the Mediterranean and you'll picture perfect coastlines, spectacular mountainsides and landscapes lined with olive trees. The “Monumental Olive Trees ” may not be the first attraction you consider visiting in Northern Cyprus, but these gifts of mother nature are certainly overwhelming. Located in the village of Kalkanli on the North West coast, just outside Guzelyurt , these are the most ancient olive trees in Northern Cyprus, believed to have been planted in the 11th century Lusignan period. Some 2,000 colossal trees over 700 years in age , this area is one of the most important projects in the Natura 2000 initiative under EU protection. The area is a living cultural and natural heritage and makes a very popular attraction. If you enjoy nature and unique sights, these majestic trees in the wilderness are definitely a must-do on the list. Top Guides > Nature > Mushrooming Mushroom hunting is serious business in Northern Cyprus – really. A mushroom is actually the fruit of a fungus, which is simply a net of threadlike fibres called a mycelium, which grows in soil, wood or decaying matter. Most mushrooms are edible and highly delicious, some aren’t edible, and the rest are deadly poisonous, so if you want to go mushroom hunting in Northern Cyprus – take notice! The function of a mushroom is to produce spores which are the bits that make it reproduce. Spore identification is the master key for fungal identification. Some mushrooms produce their spores on gills (gilled fungi); some in pores (pore fungi), some on teeth (tooth fungi), some inside a leathery pouch (puffballs), some on the inside of shallow cups (cup fungi) and some simply on the surface of the mushroom (coral fungi and others). The spores fall off, get blown away by wind, or are carried by animals, water or insects. If a spore lands in a suitable spot, it germinates and grows into a new mycelium. ​ Mushrooms fall into two major groups. Ascomycota includes morels, cup fungi and truffles. They produce their spores in a closed ascus which opens upon maturity, and are called spore shooters. Basidiomycota ​includes gilled agarics, boletes, polypores and jelly fungi. They bear their pores on naked basidia called droppers, because they drop down the gills as they mature. The mushrooms most people recognise are the gilled fungi. These typical parasol-shaped mushrooms have caps with bladelike gills on the underside and stems with or without rings. The pore fungi are similar in appearance but have a spongy layer of tubes of pores on the underside of the cap instead of gills. Mushroom collecting requires the simplest of equipment: an ice box or flat-bottomed basket; small plastic or polystyrene boxes; a roll of waxed paper; a digging tool; and paper for notes. Be sure to collect the entire mushroom, including the base. Take only fresh, young mushrooms that are free of insect damage. Each type of mushroom should be wrapped separately in waxed paper and kept in small polystyrene boxes along with any notes you might want to make about the habitat and appearance of the mushroom. Don’t use plastic wrap as it just hastens decay. It’s a good idea to note where the mushroom is growing (on wood, soil or moss for example); whether it’s single or in clusters, the colour of the caps, gills and stem; and any other distinctive features. The more you can observe about the mushroom in the field, the easier it will be to identity. ​ Individual spores are too small to be seen with the naked eye, but you can make a spore print to show the colour of the spores which is an important identifying characteristic for many mushrooms, especially the gilled fungi. To make a spore print, cut the stem off and place the cap gill-side or pore-side on a piece of white paper for coloured spores or coloured paper for white spores. (For best results use white paper and black paper). Cover with a bowl or jar. If the mushroom is at the right stage, not too young, old or deteriorated, the spores will slowly collect on the paper. A spore print will be visible in 12-24 hours. There’s over 100 different species belonging to 60 different genera in Northern Cyprus. Top Guides > Nature > Reptiles & Amphibians Herpetofauna All of the amphibians and reptiles that exist in a specific area. The herpetofauna of Northern Cyprus is represented by 3 amphibian and 23 reptile species (3 are turtles), 11 lizards and 9 snakes. The biodiversity of Cyprus fauna may not be as wide as continental Eastern Mediterranean countries, but due to its’ geographical isolation, endemism is high. Animals on Cyprus have been separated from their continental counterparts for so long they’ve evolved slightly differently. The Troodos lizard is one of 7 endemic species on the island. Geological formation of the island occurred over three geologic time periods. In the Palaeozoic period, Troodos Mountains started to emerge as an island. In the Mesosoic period the Pentadactylos Mountains started to take shape as another island. During the Cenozoic period, with sea levels changing, the Mesaria plain took shape and formed the island as it is today, so Cyprus has been separated from the Anatolian mainland for around 5 million years. This isolation had a crucial role in forming the present day herpetofauna of Cyprus and is probably the main reason for endemic reptile races. There are no venomous lizards or frogs in Cyprus but 30% of snakes are. Cat Snake and Eastern Montpellier Snakes are usually harmless. Even if they bite your fingers their fangs are way back in their upper jaws so they’re unlikely to pierce your skin. The Blunt-nosed Viper however, can be dangerous to mammals, including humans, as it has a large pair of venom fangs in the front of its upper jaw. ​ If you’re bitten by a venomous snake: ​ Reassure and calm the person. Immobilise the bite area, as movement may spread the venom. Immediately go to a hospital with antivenin facilities. If medical attention is going to be more than an hour away, a firm, but not tight, ligature can be applied over the bite area to slow the venom spreading. Cutting with a sterile razor or sucking the wound is not recommended. The first may induce shock and the second might poison the sucker! Washing with strong disinfectants or with potassium permanganate should be avoided. People who happen to be highly sensitive to snake venom may collapse. Get them medical attention asap. ​ Northern Cyprus Herpetofauna Name Family Endemic Budak's Skink Scincidae No Ocellated Skink Scincidae No Spotted Skink Scincidae Subspecies Level Worm Snake Typhlopidae No Large Whip Snake Colubridae No Dahl's Whip Snake Colubridae No Coin Snake Colubridae No Levantine Dwarf Snake Colubridae No Dice Snake Colubridae No Cat Snake Colubridae Subspecies Level Eastern Montpellier Snake Colubridae No Blunt-Nosed Viper Viperidae Subspecies Level Green Toad Bufonidae No Lemon-Yellow Tree Frog Hylidae No Levantine Marsh Frog Ranidae No Balkan Terrapin Geomydidae No Loggerhead Turtle Chelonidae No Green Turtle Chelonidae No Kotschy's Gecko Gekkonidae Subspecies Level Turkish Gecko Gekkonidae No Starred Agama Agamidae Subspecies Level European Chameleon Chamaelontidae No Spiny-Footed Lizard Lacertidae No Troodos Lizard Lacertidae Species Level Snake-Eyed Lizard Lacertidae Subspecies Level Top Guides > Nature > Snakes Snakes normally generate dread as people imagine they're going to jump out and bite, but the reality is that snakes just want to be left alone, so if you do come across one, leave it be! Even non-poisonous snakes may bite or whip their tails to defend themselves if they feel threatened, so simply turn round and walk the other way and they'll more often than not simply slide away or not react at all. Worm Snake The pink worm snake (Typhlops Vermicularis) is the most uncommon snake in Cyprus. It’s small, only 25-40 centimetres long, and its shape makes it look like a worm. It lives and hunts underground, eating ants, ant eggs and maggots, as well as spiders and insects. Snakes are an important part of the ecological system and their extinction would have grave consequences. There are many natural predators, including cats, which were imported in large quantities on the orders of a saint in the 4th century, and they are very effective at their job. The Large Whip Snake or Black Snake The Black Snake (Coluber Jugularis) is common in North Cyprus and non-venomous, but it does kill its prey by constriction (squeezing them to death!). Can grow to around 3 metres in length and is considered the longest snake in Europe. Up until 5-6 years of age, it has a brick colour with dark brown spots but later takes its' characteristic black colour. Can be found in heights up to 1,500 metres, habitat can be fields, forests, mountain areas and sometimes up a tree raiding a bird’s nest for eggs. Its diet consists of small mammals, bird, lizards and even other snakes. It was imported to keep the numbers of poisonous varieties down. It is completely harmless but considered dangerous when thretened. If found in danger, it lifts its body to bite, which is not poisonous but may last longer due to the curviness of its teeth. It is this snake which is most often seen on the island, and you can often see them on the road where they have been run over by a car. An adult has gleaming black skin with a bluish tint. The younger snakes are light brown with dark spots or stripes. The whip snake eats rodents and other snakes, and is a powerful enemy of the poisonous blunt-nosed viper. The Cyprus Whip Snake Non-venomous species endemic to Cyprus. Changes from olive-brown to a dark brown-black on maturing. Can grow to around 1.5m, is often seen in rocky, well vegetated areas near to streams and mainly feeds on lizards, snakes, frogs, rodents and inssects. It is completely harmless and will flee in the presence of humans. It's a rare breed on the island and located at heights up to 2,400 metres. It moves day as well as night. Ir prefers wet shady area near streams or dams which are covered by bushes or other vegetation. ​ The Coin Snake The coin Snake (Coluber Numifer) is non-venomous and often mistaken for the Blunt Nosed Viper, which is very dangerous, but the circles on its back are brighter and more distinct. Will hiss loudly if it feels threatened and can give a painful bite. Grows to around 1.4m, has a large head, is yellow or gray brown in colour and has distinctive markings on the top and side of its head with a roundish pattern along its length. Feeds on lizards, mice, small birds and geckos. Most often seen in the coastlines and mountain areas. ​ The Cat Snake Hunts at night so you may not see this one so much. Slow moving and venomous but not known to bite humans. If threatened, will coil up into a ring, raise itself and hiss at you. Can grow to around 1m in length, has a yellow-brown body colour covered with black spots and lives mainly on a diet of lizards. Not a common species, but you may find them in some coastal areas as well as the Troodos mountain area.You can find this snake at all heights, in open forest areas as well as residential areas and can lay to 8 eggs. It mainly feeds on small mammals as well as lizards. It hunts at dawn and dusk and kills its prey with venom and then swallows it. T he Montpellier Snake Venomous but very rarely would bite and the poison is not life threatening anyway, but would cause swelling and headaches so take note.. Usually grey-brown in colour and can grow to 2m in length. Has coarse scales which sound like grinding when slithering and ridged eyebrows make it look quite menacing. Found in forests, open fields, coastal and mountain areas, it feeds mainly on lizards, small mammals and insects. It also feeds on other snakes while the young feed on insects and mainly beetles. On the back of its jaw it has two large poisonous teeth. Its large eyes are characteristic of its good eyesight which is its main sense. The Blunt Nosed Viper The most dangerous snake in North Cyprus with a potentially deadly bite. It's also a protected species so it's illegal to kill them (even though their bite might kill you!). Grey-brown colour camouflages it with the rocky terrain it favours, so keep alert if you're walking in mountain areas. They're also known to like areas around swimming pools during the hotter summer months, because of wildlife that comes to drink at pool-sides. Can be quite fat in appearance and growing to around 1.5m with a diamond patterned back. It will warn you of its presence with hissing (how considerate!), but will attack quickly if threatened. Its bite is made more dangerous by the fact that it imbeds its fangs into tissue and pumps large amounts of poison into the wound. Top Guides > Nature > Tulipa Cypria This perennial bulb plant is a Cyprus endemic belonging to the Liliaceae family . Grown on the pastures around the Tepebaşı and Avtepe villages, the deep red flower blossoms can be seen in March and April. Under protection and picking forbidden, the absence of references to this endemic tulip species in ancient literature suggests that the Cyprus Tulip may be a recent mutant of a species which arrived within the last 300 – 400 years. Tulipa cypria, the Cyprus tulip, is an erect perennial bulbous herb, 15–40 cm high (in blossom), with glabrous, glaucous leaves. It flowers March–April. The fruit is a capsule. The Cypriot tulip grows in juniperus phoenicea maquis pastures and cereal fields, on limestone at altitudes of 100–300 m (330–980 ft) above sea level. The plant is endemic to Cyprus, on Akamas, Kormakitis and some areas of the Pentadaktylos range. It's very rare and strictly protected. Top Guides > Nature > SP OT ( Society for the Protection of Turtles) Top Guides > Nature > Water A new £270 million undersea water pipeline from Türkiye (Northern Cyprus Water Supply Project) puts water “on tap” in North Cyprus. Previously water come solely from rainfall and costly desalination and dry summers saw drinking, golf course and irrigation water shortages. Now the Northern Cyprus Water Supply Project, initiated by Türkiye 40 miles away, has guaranteed clean, pure drinking water for everyone in the TRNC and, potentially, eventually for the whole island. ​ Alakopru dam , built in Anamur in the Mersin province of Southern Türkiye, holds up to 4.61 billion cubic feet of water. The water goes to a pumping station which pumps it through an 80km (50 mile) long pipe, 250m nder the sea, to a pumping station in Northern Cyprus. There, it gets pumped to the massively expanded, spectacular Gecitkoy Dam , which nestles behind the Besparmak hills close to Kyrenia. This project has enhanced irrigation, agriculture and hence the standard of living, as well as ensuring that all residents and visitors never have to face water shortages in the future. The pipeline will also potentially provide electricity to Northern Cyprus from Türkiye. Dubbed “Peace Water” or in Turkish “Baris Su” – many experts hope the water can act as a catalyst for increasing co-operation between North and South Cyprus, as the South is urgently in need of a reliable supply of fresh water too. Half of the new water will be used for irrigation and half for domestic consumption . One thing's for sure – you can now benefit not just from the reported increase in land prices as a result of the pipeline, but also from beautifully pure and healthy Turkish spring water. On tap! Top Guides > Nature > Wild Donkeys You might have bumped into these lovely animals while exploring the beautiful landscapes of the Karpaz Peninsula, or paying a visit to the Apostolos Andreas Monastery , or out towards Zafer Burnu . Descended from the African wild ass, donkeys were domesticated around 4,000 BC. Traditionally, donkeys played an important role in agriculture on the Karpaz Peninsula, to carry olives from the groves and cereals from the fields to mills. Households often had one or two donkeys which were sure-footed and often able to carry more than a horse. However by the 1970’s, tractors and trucks began to replace these donkeys which were abandoned and left to fend for themselves. All stray donkeys across the island were subsequently rounded up and taken to the Karpaz , and despite farmers installing fences to protect their crops, many donkeys escaped into the wider area which is the protected National Park. ​ These hardworking, faithful, reliable and docile creatures with strikingly beautiful eyes are a must see for island sightseers. You’d be forgiven if you thought you saw horses at first, thanks to their sizeable bodies, but don’t let their size fool you, these donkeys are actually quite friendly. Lovers of open fields and tasty carrots or carobs, they enjoy being patted and given treats. Just make sure you don’t squeeze them too much because they'll show some attitude if you step too far into their comfort zones. The most popular and widespread type of the Cyprus Donkey has a dark coat with a white belly and is probably of European origin. This is the unusually large breed, which is a favourite amongst tourists. There’s also a smaller type of donkey that typically has a grey coat and has African roots. One thing is certain about both breeds: no matter their size or coat, you’ll love them just the same. The Cyprus Donkey isn’t the only animal unique to Cyprus. There’s the majestic Cyprus Mouflon , a wild sheep, which is classified as “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The Mediterranean Monk Seal is also under the “endangered” category, and has been spotted along the shores of Cyprus in increasing numbers over recent years, even though they’re not unique to Cyprus. Perhaps it was the focus on preserving these animals or many others, like green and loggerhead turtles, that left the friendly Cyprus Donkey slightly underappreciated over the years. When news broke out in 2008 that their numbers were declining, the reaction of the Cypriot population was so heartfelt that it sparked one of the first collaborations between both sides of the island in years. Top

  • Locations | North Cyprus Whatsonintrnc

    Guides > Locations Alsancak Çatalköy Hidden Getaways Lapta Tatlisu Bahçeli Esentepe Iskele Lefke West Coast Bellapais Famagusta Karşıyaka Nicosia Zeytinlik Boğaz (Karpaz) Güze lyurt Kyrenia Ozanköy Guides > Locations > Alsancak Alsancak is a large village situated on the hillside, yet still reasonably close to the coast. Many ex-pats love this traditional village due to the green surroundings and well-developed infrastructure. It's 15 minutes from Kyrenia but has great facilities including English school and supermarkets, as well as hotels and restaurants. There are several beautiful beaches to visit. The most popular beach is the Escape Beach Club, which offers lots of entertainment, water sports, music, restaurant and bar. There are other beaches near to the Merit Crystal Cove Hotel and the twin hotels, Merit Premium & Casino Hotel and the Merit Royal. The Alsancak Folk Dance festival takes place in July. ​ Distances from Alsancak : Kyrenia - 16 mins Ercan - 55 mins Larnaca - 90 mins Top Guides > Locations > Bahçeli Heading further along the Esentepe Coast road you'll find the Bahçeli Coast area. This area gets its name from Bahçeli village which doesn't have a lot of property options svailable but the coastline below the village boasts popular new developments right on the coast. Restaurants in this area include the very popular Coconut Bar as well as great local options including the Sea Breeze overlooking the coast. Average distances from Bahçeli : Kyrenia - 30 mins Ercan Airport - 40 mins Larnaca Airport - 85 mins Top Guides > Locations > Bellapais Tourists come from all over the world to experience the historic Bellapais , made more famous by Lawrence Durrell in his book “Bitter Lemons of Cyprus .” This charming and atmospheric hillside village is just 10 minutes from Kyrenia but a world away in time. Bellapais Abbey is the centre of attraction and was built by monks who fled the Saracen conquest of Jerusalem over 900 years ago. The spring that watered their vegetable garden still flows down the valley. Throughout spring and summer, the Abbey is the venue for the Bellapais Music Festival , filling the warm air with music. Outside, you can still sip coffee and while away the hours at the café under Durrell’s ‘Tree of Idleness" a giant mulberry that has been there almost as long as the Abbey. The most famous restaurants are the Bellapais Gardens Hotel Restaurant, perched on the steep hillside giving one of the best views in Northern Cyprus, and the charming Kybele Restaurant , a popular venue for wedding receptions, which is set almost in the grounds of the Abbey itself with stunning views down the hill to the Mediterranean. Bellapais offers some of the most interesting traditional craft and jewellery shops and lovely local cafes . Further down the hill is the English School of Kyrenia, making this village a very attractive place for families wishing to buy property. ​ Distances from Bellapais: Kyrenia - 10 mins. Ercan Airport - 40 mins. Larnaca Airport – 1 hour 40 mins. Karakum public beach - 3 mins. Cratos Hotel beach - 3 mins. English School of Kyrenia – 3 mins. Top Guides > Locations > Boğaz (Karpaz) The East coast is dominated by the ancient walled and modern cities of Famagusta and many of the original villages near to the city have been absorbed into the metropolis. 35 minutes north of Famagusta, if you're seeking the village atmosphere, you should visit the village of charming harbour village of Boğaz , which in Turkish literally means “throat", or "pass”. This east coast Boğaz village should not be confused with the “Girne Boğaz” village which is between Lefkosa (Nicosia) and Girne (Kyrenia). As a visitor or local resident in one of the many new developments near to this Bogaz harbour village, you can enjoy a lovely lunch or evening meal, looking out over the Mediterranean and watching the fishing boats coming into the small marina. There's a large supermarket nearby although most of the shops and other restaurants are found in the area of Iskele. ​ Distances from Boğaz : Famagusta - 35 mins. Ercan Airport - 50 mins. Larnaca Airport - 70 mins. Top Guides > Locations> Çatalköy “Çatalköy” literally means “forked village ” and is so named as the roads split in two directions in the village. The heart of the village is very traditional with local coffee shops, mosque and mini markets. Lower Çatalköy stretches right down to the sea, with great local supermarkets on the main road. Wxtremely sought-after area for both locals and ex-pats seeking a residence and offers an ideal location being near all facilities yet still having a village centre. Homes here include restored old houses, luxury villas with pools andmodern apartments. Çatalköy has two of the country’s biggest 5-star hotels, the Cratos and the Malpas . Çatalköy also offers two beautiful beach clubs – the Shayna Beach club (a small sandy bay, which is very popular with the locals) and the Cornaro beach club which is part of the Malpas Hotel. There's a huge number of restaurants in Çatalköy, offering wonderful seafront locations, fabulous fresh local cuisine and occasional live music in the summer. ​ Distances from Çatalköy : Kyrenia – 10 mins. Beach clubs – 3 mins. Ercan Airport - 40 mins. Larnaca Airport - 90 mins. Top Guides > Locations> Esentepe “Esentepe” means “windy hill ”. Perched on the top of a hill, this charming old village, 25 minutes east of Kyrenia, has some of the best views on the North East Coast of Cyprus that stretch all the way along the coast to Kyrenia and beyond. The village is up a sweeping road up the hill from the coast road. The village square has at its heart an old Church which has been converted to the local mosque, and an increasing number of shops aserving locals and ex-pats alike. There's lots of local and traditional eateries, several shops and supermarkets, the local council offices and a small medical centre with ambulance station. This is a great place to visit and enjoy the fabulous views whilst enjoying a drink, coffee or a meal with a great view! ​ The name Esentepe was originally used only for the hilltop village but now refers to a coastal area stretching for about 5 miles from Korineum Golf Course to the east all the way to Esentepe Beach to the west with much in between. Although these Esentepe coastal facilities aren't on a windy hill, they all took the name when they were built. Korineum Golf Club includes Korineum Beach Club, Restaurants and Spa which are all open to non-residents. Just past this on the coast are some of the best known new “villages” that offer their own facilities and are the locations of choice for many ex-pats who can enjoy the beach while still being able to drive up the hill to the original Esentepe village for banking and medical facilities. The best-known beaches in the Esentepe area are Esentepe public sandy beach and the private Korineum Beach Club, open to the public for a daily fee. New villages such as Turtle Bay village and Carrington offer their residents private beaches. Popular local restaurants include Remzi’s, Tumba, Stone Castle, Korineum Golf club, Taro Brasserie and the famous Cengiz's. There's a petrol station close to the village turn off. ​ Average distances from Esentepe : Kyrenia - 25 mins. Ercan Airport - 45 mins. Larnaca Airport - 90 mins. Top Guides > Locations > Famagusta Famagusta , known locally as Gazimağusa or simply Mağusa, was the most important port city in Cyprus. The naturally deep harbour attracted ships, merchants and traders from all over the Mediterranean and made the city flourish with wealth. This wealth inspired merchants to build lots of churches and led to the city bing known as “the district of churches”. At one time Famagusta was said to have a church for every day of the year, each one paid for by someone hoping to buy their place in heaven. Every turn in this city reveals churches with a story to tell. Today, the area boasts some of the most impressive medieval ruins anywhere in the world. The contrasting Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque, fascinating for its gothic cathedral exterior as it was once a church, has since been converted into a mosque. A 3km walk along the Venetian walls which encircle the city, offers a wonderful insight to its history. One of the ancient City Kingdoms of Cyprus, Salamis is home to fantastic Roman ruins, containing statues, standing columns, theatre and baths. Fortresses that inspired William Shakespeare, defence models drawn by Michelangelo, Venetian Palaces inhabited by royals, hidden treasures yet to be discovered, excavated tombs with miraculous revelations, and much more. Famagusta is famous for its opulent history and a hot spot for travellers. Top Guides > Locations > Güzelyurt Travel from the capital Nicosia or alternatively head west from Kyrenia and follow the coastal route, and you 'll travel through unspoilt countryside before reaching Güzelyurt in the centre of the citrus growing area. Its name means “Beautiful Place” and its’ surrounding villages are definitely stunning. Close to the Troodos Mountains, this town is the most fertile agricultural area in Northern Cyprus growing many of its’ fruit and vegables and leads to it being called locally the “Fruit Basket ”. Also known by the Greek name of Morphou , Güzelyurt has been inhabited since the Bronze Age and was a major centre for copper mining during its history. Under British rule, it was also connected by rail to Nicosia and Famagusta. Although Güzelyurt is not as culturally or architecturally rich as other towns in Northern Cyprus, it does have deep historical roots. Visit the Archaeology and Nature Museum and the Church of St Mamas , the patron saint of tax avoiders, to see why. Built in the late 18th century, St Mamas contains Gothic and Byzantine styles as well as an exquisite glass chandelier. Its' museum holds Cypriot artefacts including ornate gold jewellery. You might want to plan your trip around the market day on a Saturday, where local produce is sold. Top Guides > Locations > Hidden Getaways Top Guides > Locations > Iskele One of the largest towns in the North, İskele is fast building a name for itself as an up-and-coming area, with wonderful golden beaches and fish restaurants. Formerly called Trikomo , legend has it as the very town the Goddess Aphrodite brought the first fruit to in Cyprus. There are two churches of historical importance in the village, Panayia Theotokos which is also a museum, built in the 12th century, and the tiny cruciform church of Ayios Iakovos (St James) erected in the 15th century. Iskele is an important tourist centre. The people are hospitable, very interested in culture and art related activities. In the municipal park of Iskele, locals and tourists stay up until the break of dawn singing live music, and enjoying sweet times past. It’s famous for its annual festival, held during the first two weeks in July, and the Mehmetcik (Galateia) grape festival, normally held during the first week in August. Both these festivals are major regional cultural events, attracting visitors across the island. Travel further North and the sandier shores and clear blue waters of Bafra are second to none. Previously an old village, Bafra has metamorphosised into a major tourism hotspot with the development of high-class hotels and casinos. On the main road from Famagusta to the Karpaz Peninsula, it’s worth a stop, if only to take in the fresh sea breeze. Top Guides > Locations > Karşıyaka The Besparmak (5 fingers) mountain range towers over Karşiyaka with the mountains here being much closer to the sea. The traditional village of Karşiyaka is on the hillside with lovely views and traditional cafes and local mini markets. There are panoramic views from both the village and the surrounding areas. Most of the newer properties are built outside of the village both on the hillside, just a short drive down to the beach, or on the coast. Karişyaka properties tend to be more easily available and priced more realistically than properties in Alsancak or Lapta. The Karşiyaka area is surrounded by nature, picnic areas and pretty little beaches. There are plenty of local traditional restaurants and European-style bars. The wide Karşiyaka bay invites you for swimming, sunbathing and walking along the seashore. ​ Distances from Karşiyaka : Kyrenia - 30 mins. Ercan Airport - 60 mins. Larnaca Airport - 1 hour 45 mins. Top Guides > Locations > Kyrenia Kyrenia , or Girne as it's known locally, has had it all for 6,000 years. Early settlers were surely attracted by the location in which this beautiful port still sits. The warm clear waters of the Mediterranean lap gently along miles of gorgeous sandy beaches, backed by the slopes of the surrounding Five Finger Mountains. Set in the midst of this stunning location is the city of Kyrenia , bursting with trendy villages and historical sites. Throughout its history, Kyrenia has attracted great civilisations to enjoy and add their stamp to its culture. Greek, Roman, French, Ottoman and British architecture and customs remain, packed in the town’s cobbled streets, small harbour and magnificent castle. This sits spectacularly opposite the harbour wall. Once guarding the bustling port, it now provides a backdrop to stunning quayside cafes, bars and restaurants. The citadel is packed with artefacts from its past to be appreciated by everyone. Kyrenia gives you an experience you'll treasure. It's an amazing city filled with luxury accommodation and a host of leisure spots and events. Top Guides > Locations > Lapta Lapta village (on the hill) is favoured by those who really want a traditional village experience, with a maze of windy hillside lanes and roads and lovely local facilities and restaurants. Here ex-pats can purchase both converted village houses and newer properties which have been built closer to the sea. The area around Lapta is full of citrus trees – the lemon is the symbol of Lapta. The spring Orchid Festival takes places here. Lapta coast boasts a brand new seaside walkway, a fully-paved area for leisure and exercise right on the Mediterranean coast. The “Lapta strip” right on the coast is one of the most developed holiday areas on the North Coast of Cyprus with a multitude of bars and restaurants making this a popular area with holidaymakers. There are numerous venues for shopping and relaxation. The Sunset Beach Club is very popular with its traditional summer BBQ nights. Distances from Lapta : Kyrenia - 20 mins. Ercan Airport - 60 mins. Larnaca Airport - 100 mins. Top Guides > Locations > Lefke A small town bordered by picturesque coastline, the Troodos Mountains, lakes and reservoirs. Water from mountain springs flows down to fertile plains with rich soil and gentle climate. No surprise the area's known as ‘The Fruit Basket of Cyprus ’. Fruit, nuts and citrus groves flourish. In summer, check out the Orange Festival in nearby Güzelyurt, the Walnut Festival in July and the date festival in the autumn. In Roman times, Lefke was a thriving copper and gold mining town. Evidence of this remains, along with 3 mosques from the Ottoman period and houses that reflect the town’s colonial history. Nearby are the ancient city of Soli and the Palace of Vouni. Soli is famous for its Roman remains, particularly the Basilica, with its mosaic floor, and an amphitheatre which has been restored and now presents plays and concerts. The Palace at Vouni enjoys a spectacular cliff-top location and the ruins will remind you of bygone splendour. Beyond Lefke is the lovely border town of Yesilirmak with its Strawberry festival at the end of April and early May. Nearer to Guzelyurt is the village of Gaziveren . Top Guides > Locations> Nicosia Nicosia, or Lefkoşa as it's known locally, is the largest city and capital of Northern Cyprus. It brims character, and is an intriguing look into the past. The city’s best known feature is probably the 14ft tall Venetian Wall that was built to encircle the city, complete with 11 bastions and 3 city gates. Built in the 16th century, and still in excellent condition, the walls surround the Old Town. Not much has changed there for many years and a stroll through it will see you appreciate the calm and relaxed atmosphere as you admire architectural treasures. The Buyuk Han, the ‘Great Inn ’ was built by the Ottomans in 1572 and is today a beautiful courtyard with shops and cafés. From the Selimiye Mosque with its gothic cathedral exterior to a 400-year-old Great Hammam Turkish bath house, there's so many historical sights to appreciate. With much to discover and experience here, you'll sure to love this city’s timeless charm. Top Guides > Locations > Ozanköy Ozanköy village is a popular choice for both a holiday home and for property owners living in Northern Cyprus full time. ​ Only 5 minutes’ drive from Kyrenia, it combines great views with the quaint atmosphere of a traditional village and excellent restaurants. ​ The world-famous Bellapais Abbey can be seen from almost every spot in Ozanköy, where you can really feel the atmosphere of the past as you explore its narrow streets and traditional stone-built buildings. ​ Distances from Ozanköy : Kyrenia - 5 mins. Ercan Airport - 35 min. Larnaca Airport - 90 mins. Karakum public beach - 5 mins. Cratos Hotel beach - 5 mins. English School of Kyrenia – 5 mins. Top Guides > Locations > Tatlisu The area of Tatlisu stands at the gateway to the beautiful Karpaz peninsula with Kantara Castle towering over it in the distance. Again, like Bahceli village, the heart of the old hillside village of Tatlisu is a local Cypriot area only, but is worth visiting for the huge old Church (now a mosque) and the great views. Below the village of Tatlisu is the Tatlisu Coast area, extremely popular with ex-pats and local residents being nearer the sea, that has its own village facilities. Residential and holiday villages including Sweetwater Bay, Seaterra Marina and Caesar Bay. This area may be further from Kyrenia but has its own main road to Ercan and Larnaca Airports, which reduces airport driving time. Popular restaurants overlook the Mediterranean and there are supermarket and local café facilities as well as a petrol station. Beaches used by residents of Tatlisu tend to be either the onsite swimming facilities or for fabulous sandy beaches , a 10-minute drive east to the Tatlisu Belediye Beach, or a little further to Kaplica with its gorgeous long sandy beach and restaurant. ​ Average distances from Tatlisu : Kyrenia - 35 mins. Ercan Airport - 35 mins. Larnaca Airport - 80 mins. Top Guides > Locations > West Coast Top Guides > Locations > Zeytinlik Zeytinlik is a small, cosy village that's practically part of the town of Kyrenia, although technically just outside. ‘Zeytinlik ’ means “full of olives” and the area hosts a colourful Olive Festival each year to promote its most famous asset. Most of the properties in this village offer beautiful panoramic views, overlooking Kyrenia. ​ The village is very centrally located and offers short distances to schools, restaurants and beaches. From Zeytinlik the closest beach is approximately 5 minutes’ drive to the Karaoglanoglu municipality beach, next to the Merit Park Hotel & Casino. Top

  • Vacations | Whats On In TRNC

    Guides >- Vacations Flights Tours & Excursions Hotels Transfers Car Hire Guides > Vacations > Flights > Airlines that fly to North Cyprus Turkish Airlines Corendon Pegasus Tailwind Andalou Jet Freebird Top Guides > Vacations > Hotels in North Cyprus Name Location Phone Acapulco Holiday Village Catalkoy +90 392 650 4555 Ada Hotel Alsancak +90 392 821 8236 Alda Hotel Lapta +90 392 821 8780 Alkan Holiday Village Esentepe +90 392 823 6280 Almond Holiday Village Alsancak +90 392 821 2887 Altinkaya Holiday Complex Girne +90 392 815 5001 Ambelia Village Bellapais +90 392 815 3655 Anadolu Hotel Girne +90 392 815 1174 Atlantis Hotel Girne +90 392 815 2505 Avenue Hotel Girne +90 392 815 4049 Babayigit Hotel Zeytinlik +90 392 822 3939 Bare Hill Holiday Village Alsancak +90 392 821 2609 Bella View Hotel Bellapais +90 533 852 1155 Bellapais Gardens Hotel Bellapais +90 392 815 6066 Bellapais Monastery Village Hotel Bellapais +90 392 815 9171 Bristol Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6570 Bristol Hotel Girne +90 392 815 2240 Citrus Tree Gardens Alsancak +90 392 821 2872 Colony Hotel Girne +90 392 815 1518 Cratos Premium Hotel Catalkoy +90 392 444 4242 Crystal Bay View Apartments Bahceli +90 533 836 6650 Denix Konak Butil Otek Girne +90 392 815 0541 Denizkizi Hotel Alsancak +90 392 821 2676 Dome Hotel Girne +90 392 815 2453 Dorana Hotel Girne +90 392 815 3521 Elexus Hotel Girne +90 392 650 1000 Fez Boutique Hotel & Restaurant Catalkoy +90 533 867 1781 Five Ginger Holiday Village Ozankoy +90 392 815 4096 Flippers Holiday Village Lapta +90 392 821 2729 Glaro Garden Hotel Dip Karpaz Girne +90 392 372 2410 Golden Bay Hotel Alsancak +90 392 821 8540 Golden Palms Gazimagusa +90 392 366 2277 Grand Centre Boutique Hotel Girne +90 392 816 0183 Grand Pasha Hotel Girne +90 392 650 6600 Green Holiday Village Girne +90 392 821 3300 Harbour Scene Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6855 High Life Holiday Village Karakum +90 392 815 3383 Hilarion Holiday Village Karmi +90 392 822 2563 Jasmine Court Hotel Girne +90 392 815 1450 Kaan Hotel Girne +90 392 815 4515 Kaplica Hotel Karpaz +90 533 852 1361 Kaya Palazzo Hotels & Resort Karaoglanoglu +90 392 444 5292 Kyrenia Palace Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6008 LA Holiday Centre Lapta +90 392 821 8981 Lapethos Resort Hotel Lapta +90 392 821 8961 Le Chateau Lambousa Hotel Lapta +90 392 815 3535 Life Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6521 Light House Hotel Girne +90 392 815 9665 Liman Hotel Girne +90 392 815 2001 Lord's Palace Hotel Girne +90 533 650 3500 Lord's Residence Boutique Hotel Girne +90 392 820 0404 MC Palace Hotel Catalkoy +90 533 856 9552 Malpas Hotel Catalkoy +90 392 650 3000 Marmaris Hotel Lapta +90 392 821 8575 Merit Crystal Cove Hotel Alsancak +90 392 650 2000 Merit Park Hotel Kervansary +90 392 650 2500 Merit Royal Hotel Alsancak +90 392 650 4000 Meryem's Hotel Catalkoy +90 392 824 5073 Mountain View Hotel Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 3453 Nostalgia Hotel Girne +90 392 815 3079 Olive Paradise Holiday Village Lapta +90 392 821 3390 Olive Tree Catalkoy +90 392 824 4200 Olivia Palm Boutique Hotel Girne +90 539 104 0999 Onar Holiday Village Girne +90 392 815 5850 Oscars Resort Girne +90 392 815 4801 Palm Beach Hotel Gazimagusa +90 392 366 2000 Pia Bella Hotel Girne +90 392 815 5321 Pine Bay Holiday Village Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 3035 Riverside Holiday Complex Alsancak +90 392 821 8906 Riviera Hotel Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 2877 Rocks Hotel & Casino Girne +90 392 650 0400 Royal Marina Hotel Girne +90 392 650 3388 Sammy's Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6279 Sempati Hotel Alsancak +90 392 821 2770 Ship Hotel Girne +90 392 815 6701 Silver Waves Hotel Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 3208 Simena Hotel Karsiyaka +90 392 825 2476 Sofia Boutique Hotel Girne +90 392 815 2132 Tervetuloa Hotel Alsancak +90 533 863 2394 The Courtyard Karakum +90 392 815 3343 The Hideaway Karmi +90 392 822 2620 Top Set Hotel Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 2204 Watermill Hotel Girne +90 392 815 1741 White Pearl Hotel Girne +90 533 870 9141 Book a Hotel Top Guides > Vacations > North Cyprus Transfer Services Go North Cyprus Ercan Airport Taxis Transfer N. Cyprus Sun Transers Cyprus Paradise Get Transfer North Cy Transfer Welcome Taxi A1 Cyprus Holidays in N. Cyprus Pickup North Cyprus Cyprustaxi.net Top Guides > Vacations > Flights > Car Hire in North Cyprus IHiring a car is undoubtedly the best way to see all that Northern Cyprus has to offer. It allows you to set your own timetable and go exactly where you want and when you want. Travel the scenic coastal routes from the farthest point west, all the way to the tip of the Karpaz Peninsula in the east. A journey that isn’t possible on public transport. Drive the mountain routes, take in the spectacular scenery or have a picnic under scented pines. See all the ancient sites and ramble through crusader castles with no rush to move on. Driving in Northern Cyprus is much like driving in the UK; the same side of the road, signs that are for the most part international and well-placed speed limit notices and direction signs. Pre-book in high season as demand, especially for vehicles with air-conditioning, is high. ​ ​North Cyprus car hire specifications and regulations: Rght-hand drive unless a left-hand drive car is specifically requested Manual and automatic available, state preference Cars may be calibrated in MPH or KPH Speed limits on all roads are posted in KPH Full current driving licence is required Hirers must be over 21 years of age​ Hire a Car Terms and Conditions of renting a car in Northern Cyprus: Prices do not normally include collision damage waiver (CDW) Additional drivers are not normally included Minimum booking is usually 3 days for pickup and drop off at apartments Minimum booking is usually 7 days for pickup and drop off at the Car hire is billed in 24 hour periods If you arrive at night, book your car from 10 am the following morning Cars are generally picked up and dropped off at around 10 am Driving in North Cyprus is similar to driving in the UK in as much as speed limits are approximately the same on conversion - 100KPH on the motorway; 50KPH in town; 65KPH limit on the approach to junctions; and the use of speed cameras is countrywide. Speeding fines are heavy. Drunken driving is not tolerated and anyone failing a breath test may well spend the night in the local police station. Seat belts are compulsory for drivers and front-seat passengers. Car Hire Companies in North Cyprus Name Location Phone A-One Rent a Car Girne +90 542 852 3006 Abant Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 4524 Acmenya Car Rentals Alsancak +90 392 821 2736 Ada Rent a Car Girne +90 533 849 6303 Akman's Rent a Car Girne +90 533 822 4165 Arizona Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 1355 Atakara Rent a Car Alsancak +90 392 821 8184 Atlantic Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 3053 Autumn Rent a Car Kervansaray +90 533 866 6383 Baag Rent a Car Catalkoy +90 533 854 3040 Baspinar Rent a Car Girne +90 542 888 4888 Bellapais Rent a Car Girne +90 392 444 0131 Belvu Car Rentals Alsancak +90 392 821 8306 Bikers Club Girne +90 392 815 9245 Bird Rent a Car Karaoglanoglu +90 392 822 2379 Brisk Rent a Car Esentepe +90 533 834 2188 British Rent a Car Girne +90 533 851 7348 Carrington Cars Girne +90 533 840 0070 Cyprent Rent a Car Girne +90 533 840 0070 Cyprus Pines Rent a Car Esentepe +90 533 866 5237 Cyprus Pines Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 0291 Dark & Blue Car Rental Girne +90 542 854 7708 Driver Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 8851 EVA Rent a Car Girne +90 392 444 7171 Easy Quick Car Rental Girne +90 542 855 1176 GM Cyprus Rent a Car Girne +90 533 859 2159 Grandeur Rent a Car Ozankoy +90 533 873 6289 Green Valley Car Hire Alsancak +90 392 821 3107 Gsmart Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 7850 Gunray Rent a Car Girne +90 533 868 8317 Inter Car Rental Girne +90 533 840 0410 Jeep Safari Girne +90 533 881 8993 Kyrenia Castle Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 8970 Kyrenia Motorbike & Scooter Rental Girne +90 533 845 6019 Le Chateau Lambouse Hotel Rent a Car Lapta +90 392 821 3535 Mustafa Transfer Alsancak +90 533 877 6378 Olive Paradise Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 4937 Oscar Car Rentals Girne +90 392 815 2272 Ozy's (Ibo's) Car & Bicycle Hire Girne +90 533 865 6305 Pacific Rent a Car Girne +90 542 852 1920 Pine Bay Club Rent a Car Alsancak +90 392 822 3032 Riverside Rent a Car Girne +90 392 821 2211 Sam's Place Rent a Car Alsancak +90 542 857 4720 Sevener Rent a Car Girne +90 392 821 2606 Soydan Car Rentals Karakum +90 392 444 1011 Sun Rent a Car Girne +90 392 815 4979 Top Guides > Vacations > Tours & Excursions Kültur Türlari Sidetour Tour with me Go North Cyprus Private Tours Tour Plus T Zone Cyprus Cyprus Paradide Puzzle Travel Tours by Locals wizygbe Tours Top

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    Gizlilik Politikası Turkuaz Bay Topluluğu ("biz", "bize", "bizim"), Kuzey Kıbrıs Türk Cumhuriyeti ("KKTC") Turkuaz Bay, Esentepe'deki daire sahiplerini temsil etmek üzere yasal olarak kayıtlı kuruluştur. Bu Gizlilik Politikası, Tekliflerimizle ("Bilgiler") etkileşimde bulunan bireyler ("siz") hakkında hangi kişisel bilgileri topladığımızı, kullandığımızı, paylaştığımızı ve başka şekilde işlediğimizi açıklamaktadır. Bazı ülkelerin yasalarına göre, bilgilerinizi işlememiz için izninize ihtiyacımız olabilir. Bu Gizlilik Politikasında belirtilen bilgiler. İstendiğinde vazgeçme veya katılmama gibi aksi yönde bize iletebileceğiniz herhangi bir belirtiye tabi olarak ve yasaların izin verdiği durumlarda, Bilgi vererek veya Tekliflerimizle başka bir şekilde etkileşimde bulunarak, Bilgileri bu uygun şekilde kullanmamıza izin vermiş olursunuz. Gizlilik Politikası. BU GİZLİLİK POLİTİKASININ KAPSAMI Lütfen bu politikayı dikkatli okuyun. Sizin hakkınızda toplayabileceğimiz Bilgi türlerini, bunları toplama amaçlarımızı ve yöntemlerimizi ve (geçerli olduğu durumlarda) bunu yapmamızın yasal dayanağının yanı sıra veri saklama, haklarınız ve bunları nasıl elde edebileceğinizle ilgili bilgileri açıklar. Bize Ulaşın. Bu Gizlilik Politikası, aşağıda belirtilenler gibi çeşitli Tekliflerimiz aracılığıyla topladığımız Bilgiler de dahil olmak üzere hem çevrimiçi hem de çevrimdışı veri işleme faaliyetlerimizi kapsar: Dijital Hizmetler: Web sitelerimiz aracılığıyla yürütülen faaliyetler de dahil olmak üzere web sitelerimiz; Web sitelerimiz için listelenenler gibi uygulamalarımız aracılığıyla yürütülen etkinlikler de dahil olmak üzere mobil uygulamalar; Abonelik hizmetleri veya bizim tarafımızdan tüketicilere sunulan diğer akış hizmetleri ve görsel-işitsel içeriğimizi web sitelerimiz, mobil uygulamalarımız ve/veya bir internet servis sağlayıcısı, ödemeli TV platformu veya üçüncü bir tarafça sağlanan bir hizmet aracılığıyla aldığınız hizmetler. cep telefonu operatörü; Konsol oyunları; ve Üçüncü taraf sosyal ağlardaki sayfalarımız/kanallarımız/hesaplarımız. Bir tüketici veya misafir olarak katıldığınız etkinlikler (bir iş kapasitesinin aksine), pazarlama ve etkileyici etkinlikler, odak grup veya kullanıcı testleri ve tesislerimizde veya kiralık stüdyolarımızda düzenlenen özel etkinlikler. Bir kaynaktan topladığımız Bilgileri başka bir kaynaktan (ör. bir mobil uygulama, farklı şirketlerimizden biri veya bir üçüncü taraf) topladığımız Bilgilerle birleştirebileceğimizi lütfen unutmayın (aşağıda daha ayrıntılı olarak açıklandığı gibi. Bazı Tekliflerimiz işletilmeyebilir. bizim tarafımızdan, ancak bir üçüncü taraf lisans sahibi veya uygulama mağazası tarafından; kişisel bilgilerinizin bu tür bir lisans sahibi veya uygulama mağazası tarafından işlenmesi bu Gizlilik Politikasına tabi değildir, bu nedenle lütfen ilgili hüküm ve koşulların şirketlerimizden birine atıfta bulunup bulunmadığını dikkatlice kontrol edin. ya da değil. TOPLAYABİLECEĞİMİZ BİLGİLER Aşağıdaki Bilgi kategorilerini toplar, kullanır, paylaşır ve başka şekilde işleriz: 1) Sizden toplayabileceğimiz bilgiler: Tekliflerimizden biri için bize kaydolduğunuzda veya kaydolduğunuzda sizinle ilgili bilgiler de dahil olmak üzere kayıt, hesap ve kayıt Bilgileri (örneğin, ad, kullanıcı adı, şifre, e-posta, iletişim bilgileri, doğum tarihi veya yaş, içerik vb.). İlgili ödeme bilgileri (örneğin, kredi kartı bilgileri) dahil olmak üzere bir Teklifi satın almanızla ilgili bilgiler. Ayrıca deneme süreleri, ödüllerin veya promosyonların kullanımı, aktif bir aboneliğin olmadığı süreler, ödeme geçmişi ve kaçırılan ödemeler hakkındaki Bilgileri de işleyebiliriz. Size gönderdiğimiz bir e-postayı açıp açmadığınız, bir Dijital Hizmetle (kullandığınız herhangi bir hesap dahil) nasıl etkileşimde bulunduğunuz, görüntülediğiniz veya yayınladığınız içerik, reklamlar dahil olmak üzere bir Teklifi kullanımınız veya bir Teklife katılımınız hakkında bilgiler etkileşimde bulunduğunuz, oynadığınız oyunlar ve ulaştığınız seviye, bir Dijital Hizmette bulunan çeşitli özellikler, programlar, hizmetler ve içeriklere yönelik tercihleriniz ve ilginiz ve bunların kullanımı. Bu aynı zamanda bir birey veya hane düzeyi de dahil olmak üzere demografik bilgileri içerebilir. Tüketici anketlerine, araştırma çalışmalarına veya odak grup testlerine katılırken, çevrimiçi veya yazılı yanıtlar ve uygun olduğunda sesli veya görüntülü görüşmelerinizin kaydı dahil olmak üzere sağladığınız bilgiler. Resimler, videolar ve metinler dahil olmak üzere promosyonlara, yarışmalara, ödül çekilişlerine veya harekete geçirici mesajlara girişler. Bazı Dijital Hizmetler için, cihazınızın kamerasına erişmek için izin istediğimiz yerler de dahil olmak üzere kamera erişimi. İzin verirseniz, uygulama deneyimi içinde fotoğraf veya video çekebilir, bunları bize gönderebilir veya belirli artırılmış gerçeklik ("AR") özelliklerine erişebilirsiniz. Bu özelliklerden bazıları, AR efektleri uygulamak için gözlerinizin ve diğer yüz özelliklerinizin veya yakın çevrenizin hareketlerini izlemek için kamera sistemlerine güvenebilir. Tekliflerimizden birinin parçası olarak Bilgi paylaşmayı seçtiğiniz veya anketlerimizden veya geri bildirim oturumlarımızdan biri sırasında Bilgi verdiğiniz durumlar dahil olmak üzere hassas veriler; veya etnik köken, dini veya felsefi inançlar, cinsel yaşam veya cinsel yönelim veya siyasi inançlarınız. Dinamik eğlence özellikleri içeren bazı Tekliflerde, izninizi alarak ve geçerli yasalara uygun olarak yüz tarama, göz izleme veya cilt yanıtı gibi biyometrik olarak kabul edilebilecek bilgileri toplayabiliriz. Üçüncü taraf topluluklardaki hayran sayfalarımız/kanallarımız/hesaplarımız, forumlar ve sosyal medya siteleri, hizmetler, eklentiler ve uygulamalar ("Sosyal Medya Siteleri") ile etkileşimleriniz dahil olmak üzere sosyal medya katılımınız hakkında bilgiler. Bu, gönderiler, 'beğenileriniz' ve sağlayabileceğiniz diğer kullanıcı tarafından oluşturulan içeriğin yanı sıra adınız, kullanıcı kimliğiniz, profil fotoğrafınız, doğum gününüz ve bize izin verdiğiniz yerlerde arkadaş listeleriniz gibi kendinizle ilgili ayrıntıları içerebilir. ve takip ettiğiniz kişiler. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinde gizlilik ayarlarınızı nasıl özelleştirebileceğiniz ve bu Sosyal Medya Sitelerinin kişisel bilgilerinizi ve içeriğinizi nasıl ele aldığı hakkında bilgi için lütfen gizlilik yardım kılavuzlarına, gizlilik politikalarına ve kullanım koşullarına bakın. Çevrimiçi forumlara katılırken nerede fotoğraf, mektup, video veya yorum paylaştığınız da dahil olmak üzere, herkese açık veya topluluk forumlarımızda paylaşılan bilgiler. Gizlilik ayarlarınıza bağlı olarak, bu Bilgi veya içerik ve kullanıcı adınız İnternette veya bir kullanıcı topluluğu içinde herkese açık hale gelebilir. Herkese açık bir forumda veya topluluk forumunda paylaştıktan sonra bu Bilginin daha fazla kullanılmasını engelleyemeyiz. Bilgilerinizi nasıl ele aldıkları hakkında daha fazla bilgi için lütfen belirli forumun gizlilik politikalarına bakın. Cihaz bilgilerinden (bir IP adresi veya ülke kodu gibi) türetildiği yerler de dahil olmak üzere konumunuzla ilgili bilgiler, cihazınızın Dijital Hizmetlerimizle etkileşimleri veya sizin izninizle, Cihazınızın kesin konumu hakkında bilgiler (örn. mobil cihazlar aracılığıyla coğrafi konum belirleme) ). Bir stant aracılığıyla veya başka bir şekilde tarafımızca veya bizim adımıza üçüncü bir tarafça çekilmiş görüntüler ve klipler dahil Etkinlik Bilgileri ve gıda alerjileri ve diğer bireysel gereksinimler gibi bir etkinliğin organizasyonu ve yönetimi ile ilgili diğer Bilgiler. Cihaz türü, tarayıcı, benzersiz cihaz tanımlayıcısı, işletim sistemi, internet sağlayıcısı, mobil cihaz tanımlayıcısı ve/veya mobil reklam tanımlayıcısı, bağlı cihaz tanımlayıcısı (bağlı bir televizyonunki dahil), IP adresi dahil olmak üzere cihazınızdan gelen teknik/kullanım bilgileri , ağ özellikleri, televizyon cihazı ve uygulama özellikleri ve ayarları ve diğer cihaz veya tarayıcı özellikleri ve ayarları. Müşteri yardım masalarımızdan biri, e-posta adresleri, müşteri hizmetleri sohbet kutuları, formlar veya bilet sistemleri, Sosyal Medya Siteleri ve aramaların kaydedilebileceği müşteri çağrı merkezleri aracılığıyla bizimle iletişime geçtiğinizde dahil olmak üzere müşteri sorgularınız hakkında bilgiler. 2) Arkadaşlar da dahil olmak üzere diğer kaynaklardan sizin hakkınızda toplayabileceğimiz bilgiler: Diğer kaynaklardan alınan bilgiler. Zaman zaman, Bilgileri, diğer web siteleri ve çevrimiçi reklamcılık ve medya ile etkileşimleriniz hakkındaki kullanım bilgileri de dahil olmak üzere aldığımız diğer çevrimiçi bilgilerle birleştiriyoruz. Ayrıca, bize demografi, işlem ve satın alma geçmişi gibi Bilgileri sağlayan üçüncü taraf veri sağlayıcıları da dahil olmak üzere, çeşitli diğer kaynaklardan veya dış kayıtlardan alınan Bilgileri Bilgilerle tamamlıyor veya birleştiriyoruz; Etkileşimde bulunduğunuz içerik ve reklamlarla ilgili bilgiler. Sizi Dijital Hizmetlerimizden herhangi biriyle etkileşime girmeye davet eden arkadaşlarınızdan da sizinle ilgili Bilgi alabiliriz. İçeriğimize veya hizmetlerimize erişimi içeren bir abonelik sözleşmeniz olan üçüncü taraflardan Bilgi alabiliriz. Arkadaşlardan bilgi. Belirli durumlarda, Tekliflerimizi kullanan arkadaşların sizinle ilgili Bilgi vermelerini sağlayabiliriz. Örneğin, biri sizi bir Teklife katılmaya davet etmek, uygulamalarımızdan biri aracılığıyla önerilerde bulunmak veya içerik paylaşmak ya da aynı oyun oturumunu birden fazla oyuncunun paylaşmasını sağlamak için web sitelerimizde Bilgi gönderebilir. Bu talepleri işleyerek, adınız, iletişim bilgileriniz veya Tekliflerimize olan ilginiz ve bunları kullanımınız hakkındaki bilgiler dahil olmak üzere Bilgilerinizi alabiliriz. BİLGİLERİ NASIL KULLANABİLİRİZ Bilgileri, bu Gizlilik Politikasında açıklanan amaçlar için veya toplama sırasında açıklanan amaçlar için kullanabiliriz. Aşağıda, çeşitli amaçlarımızı, daha fazla açıklama gerektirebileceğini düşündüğümüz herhangi bir işleme faaliyetini ve gerektiğinde Bilgilerinizi işlemek için dayandığımız 'yasal temeli' açıklıyoruz. Bilgilerin birden fazla amaç için işlenebileceğini lütfen unutmayın. (örneğin, Teklifimizi Sunarken elde ettiğimiz Bilgiler, Teklifimizi Geliştirmek ve Geliştirmek ve/veya Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık için de kullanılabilir), aşağıdaki amaçların veya işleme faaliyetlerinin tümü her durumda geçerli olmayacaktır. Bilgilerinizi özel kullanımımız, bize verdiğiniz izinler (örneğin, doğrudan pazarlama gibi belirli kullanımlara izin verip vermediğiniz) ve diğer kontroller dahil olmak üzere, etkileşimde bulunduğunuz Teklife ve bizimle etkileşim kurma şeklinize bağlı olacaktır. Bilgilerinizi işlememize ilişkin olarak egzersiz yaparsınız (örn. Bilgilerinizin işlendiği amaçlardan bazılarını kontrol etme beceriniz, aşağıdaki BİREYSEL HAK TALEPLERİ ve ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER bölümlerinde açıklanmıştır. ​ Tekliflerimizi Sunmak Bilgilerinizi, bizimle hesabınızı oluşturmak, sizi bir Teklife kaydettirmek, bunun için ödeme yapmanızı sağlamak, Teklifi sağlamak, bir promosyona, yarışmaya, ödül çekilişine veya bir çağrıya katılmanıza izin vermek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. UGC'yi göndermek veya Teklifi sürdürmek ve sorunları çözmek için eylem. Bu, geçerli hüküm ve koşulların uygulanmasını (örneğin, abonelik hizmetlerimiz, cihaz sayısıyla ilgili sınırlamalar ve konuma göre doğru içeriğin görüntülenmesi için) ve Teklifin, ona erişmek ve " abonelik hizmetlerimizde "izlemeye devam edin" özelliği.Bilgileri işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Tekliflerimizin sağlanması ve sürdürülmesi gibi işlemlerimizin çoğu, yeni müşterilerin kaydolmasını veya bize kaydolmasını ve mevcut müşterilerin oturum açmasını sağlamak da dahil olmak üzere, sizinle aramızdaki sözleşmenin akdedilmesi veya ifa edilmesi için gereklidir. Dijital Hizmetlerimizde. Bizim 'meşru çıkarlarımız' (ve diğerlerinin çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere diğer işleme türleri gereklidir: İşimizi yürütmek, Tekliflerimizi sunmak ve müşterilerimize hizmet etmek; Önemli bildirimler veya güncellemeler için müşterilerle iletişim kurmak; Müşterilerle işlemleri, satın almaları ve rekabeti hakkında iletişim kurmak kazanır; İçeriği kişiselleştirmek ve diğer içerikler için önerilerde bulunmak; Teklifin hüküm ve koşulları kapsamında bize verilen hakları kullanmak ve/veya uygulamak; Tekliflerimiz için ödeme kolaylığı. Diğer işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güvenebiliriz. Tekliflerimizi İyileştirme ve Geliştirme Bilgilerinizi, Tekliflerimizi ve bunları kullanımınızı analiz etmek, iyileştirmek, kişiselleştirmek ve değerlendirmek ve ayrıca yeni Teklifler geliştirmek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Bu, tüketici anketlerine verdiğiniz yanıtların analizini içerebilir. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: 'Meşru çıkarlarımız' (ve diğerlerinin çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gereklidir: Tekliflerimizi iyileştirmek ve geliştirmek. İşimizde verimlilik yaratmak. Müşteri içgörüleri, pazar araştırması ve içerik performansının ölçülmesi dahil olmak üzere tüketici eğilimlerini ve ilgi alanlarını anlamak. Tekliflerimizin kullanımıyla ilgili istatistikleri derlemek. Diğer işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güvenebiliriz. Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık Bilgilerinizi, bizim ve müşterilerimizin ve ortaklarımızın Tekliflerini pazarlamak ve/veya reklamını yapmak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Ayrıca, tekliflerimiz hakkında sizinle iletişim kurmak ve Sosyal Medya Siteleri de dahil olmak üzere müşterilerimizin ve ortaklarımızın teklifleri hakkında sizi bilgilendirmek için 'segmentler' gibi kullanıcı grupları veya kategorileri oluşturmak için kullanıcılar hakkında bilgi toplayabiliriz. Bilgilerinizin bu amaçla işlenmesi, ilginizi çekmesi amaçlanan reklamları otomatik olarak seçen bir algoritmayı içerebilirken, sizin açık rızanız olmadan veya sizin üzerinizde yasal veya önemli bir etkisi olabilecek tam otomatik kararlar almayız veya geçerli yasaların izin verdiği durumlarda. UGC'yi, Teklifin ilgili hüküm ve koşullarına tabi olarak pazarlama veya reklam amacıyla da kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği n ülkede, aşağıdakilere güveniyoruz: Gönderdiğiniz UGC'yi kullanmak için Teklifin hüküm ve koşulları altında bize verilen haklara ve sizinle yaptığımız sözleşmenin yerine getirilmesine güveneceğiz. Pazarlama ve Kişiselleştirilmiş Reklamcılık için diğer işleme türleri, aşağıdakiler dahil olmak üzere meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için gereklidir: Bağlamsal (veri odaklı olmayan) reklamcılık, analitik ve reklam performansının ölçülmesi dahil olmak üzere Tekliflerimizi pazarlayarak ve reklamını yaparak ticari çıkarlarımızı geliştirmek; Mevcut müşterilerle ilişkileri derinleştirerek ve yeni müşteriler geliştirerek müşteri tabanımızı genişletmek; Gönderdiğiniz UGC'yi kullanarak (sizinle bir sözleşmenin ifası için gerekli olmadıkça veya onayınızı isteyemedikçe); ve, Markamızı hem çevrimiçi hem de çevrimdışı olarak tanıtmak. Belirli yargı alanlarında, ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık veya e-posta, kısa mesaj veya SMS yoluyla doğrudan pazarlama iletişimleri, Sosyal Medya Sitelerindeki mesajlar gibi belirli işleme türleri için (verildiği durumlarda) izninize güveniriz. Müşteri Hizmetlerinin Sağlanması Bilgilerinizi, bizimle telefon, e-posta, sohbet kutuları, formlar veya bilet hizmetleri, mektup, web sitesi veya bir Sosyal Medya aracılığıyla iletişim kursanız da, sorularınız ve şikayetlerinizle (sorun giderme dahil) ilgilenmek de dahil olmak üzere Müşteri Hizmetleri sağlamak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Alan. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Bir Teklif sağlamak için sizinle olan sözleşmemizi yerine getirmemiz için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gerekli olacaktır: Müşterilerimizin soru ve şikayetlerine yanıt vermek; Yanıtımızın ilerlemesini ve etkinliğini takip etmek; ve Müşteri Hizmetlerimizi Geliştirmek. Suç ve diğer yasa dışı faaliyetleri tespit etmek, önlemek ve soruşturmak Bilgilerinizi suç faaliyetlerini (dolandırıcılık ve telif hakkı ihlali dahil) tespit etmek, önlemek veya araştırmak, kullanıcı güvenliğini korumak ve mahkemelerde medeni haklarımızı uygulamak amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Örneğin, gerektiğinde Bilgilerinizi kanun uygulayıcı kurumlarla paylaşabilir veya haklarımızı uygulamak için size karşı yasal işlem başlatmak için kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için bazı işleme faaliyetleri gerekli olacaktır. Meşru çıkarlarımız (veya başkalarının çıkarları) için aşağıdakiler de dahil olmak üzere bazı işleme türleri gerekli olacaktır: Ticari çıkarlarımızı ve haklarımızı, gizliliğimizi, güvenliğimizi ve mülkiyetimizi veya müşterilerimizin ve kullanıcılarımızın haklarını korumak; Yasal talepler oluşturmak, uygulamak veya savunmak; Mevcut çareleri takip etmemize veya maruz kalabileceğimiz zararı sınırlamamıza izin vermek için Bilgilerinizi üçüncü taraflarla paylaşmak. Yasal yükümlülüklere uyum Bilgilerinizi muhasebe kuralları da dahil olmak üzere yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak, Bireysel Hak Taleplerine yanıt vermek ve düzenleyiciler, adli makamlar ve kolluk kuvvetleri veya devlet organlarından gelen taleplere yanıt vermek amacıyla kullanabiliriz. Bilgi işlememizin yasal bir temel gerektirdiği ülkelerde, aşağıdakilere güveniriz: Bu tür faaliyetler yasal yükümlülüklerimize uymak için gereklidir. BİLGİ PAYLAŞIMI VE AÇIKLAMA Bilgileri aşağıda belirtilen amaçlarla aşağıdaki taraflarla paylaşır ve ifşa ederiz: Şirketler grubumuz bünyesinde Şirketlerimiz, işlerini yürütmek için birbirlerini destekler ve etkileşime girer. Sonuç olarak, şirketlerimiz bu Gizlilik Politikasında belirtilen amaçlar doğrultusunda, bunu yapmak için yasal bir dayanak olması ve vermiş olduğunuz izinlerle tutarlı olması halinde (örn. pazarlama iletişimleri) ve aşağıdaki KİŞİSEL HAK TALEPLERİ ve ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER bölümlerinde açıklandığı gibi, Bilgilerinizin işlenmesiyle ilgili olarak uyguladığınız diğer kontroller (örneğin, belirli işlemlerden vazgeçmeyi seçtiğiniz durumlarda). Grup şirketlerimiz dışında Üçüncü Taraf Hizmet Sağlayıcıları. Temsilcilerimiz ve yüklenicilerimiz, Tekliflerimizin yerine getirilmesi, oluşturulması, bakımı, barındırılması ve sunulması, pazarlama yapılması, BT hizmetleri ve güvenlik sağlanması gibi ancak bunlarla sınırlı olmamak üzere, bizim için gerçekleştirdikleri hizmetleri gerçekleştirmeye yardımcı olacak Bilgilere erişime sahiptir. , ödemeleri, e-posta ve siparişleri yerine getirme, promosyonları, yarışmaları ve ödül çekilişlerini yönetme, araştırma, ölçüm ve analitik yürütme, içgörü türetme veya müşteri hizmetleri. Bağlantılı Üçüncü Taraf Sosyal Medya Siteleri. Dijital Hizmetlerimizden bazıları, müşteri etkileşimi ve pazarlama amacıyla Sosyal Medya Siteleri dahil olmak üzere diğer sitelere bağlantılar içerebilir. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinin bilgi uygulamaları bizimkinden farklı olabilir, bu nedenle bu üçüncü taraflara gönderilen veya onlar tarafından toplanan kişisel bilgiler üzerinde hiçbir kontrolümüz olmadığından, kişisel bilgilerinizi göndermeden önce gizlilik politikalarına ve koşullarına bakmalısınız. Üçüncü Taraf Ortaklar. Belirlenen üçüncü taraflarca sponsor olunan veya ortak markalı Dijital Hizmetler ve Çevrimdışı Hizmetler sunabiliriz. Bu ilişkiler sayesinde üçüncü şahıslar, faaliyet sırasında sizden kişisel bilgiler toplar veya elde eder. Bu üçüncü tarafların kişisel bilgilerini kullanmasını kontrol etmiyoruz. Veri uygulamaları hakkında bilgi edinmek için gizlilik politikalarını okumanızı öneririz. AdTech Sağlayıcıları. Belirli Bilgileri üçüncü taraflarla (örneğin diğer şirketler, perakendeciler, araştırma kuruluşları, reklamcılar, reklam ajansları, reklam ağları ve platformları, katılımcı veri tabanları, yayıncılar ve kar amacı gütmeyen kuruluşlar) genel olarak karma veya kimliksizleştirilmiş biçimde işlemek üzere paylaşabiliriz. , ilgi alanlarınıza dayalı olarak size reklam sağlamak için. Diğer üçüncü şahıslar. Bir işlem veya yeniden yapılanma gibi işin (veya işin bir bölümünün) kontrolünde olası bir değişiklik olması durumunda, Bilgilerinizi yeni bir iş sahibi de dahil olmak üzere ilgili taraflarla ve ilgili profesyonel danışmanlarıyla paylaşabiliriz. Kolluk kuvvetleri, makamlar ve mahkemeler. Bilgileri, cezai faaliyetlerin önlenmesi, soruşturulması veya kovuşturulması için gerekli olduğunda ve ayrıca yasal sürece yanıt olarak, örneğin bir mahkeme emrine veya mahkeme celbine yanıt olarak veya bir düzenleyici, hükümet yetkilisi veya kolluk kuvvetinin talebine yanıt olarak ifşa ederiz. . Herkese açık forumlar. Dijital Hizmetlerimizden biriyle etkileşimde bulunurken veya bir Sosyal Medya Sitesi aracılığıyla Bilgi gönderir veya paylaşırsanız, hizmetin niteliğine veya gizlilik ayarlarınıza bağlı olarak bu Bilgiler herkese açık hale gelebilir, bundan sonra, daha fazla kullanılmasını veya paylaşılmasını engelleyemeyiz. bu bilgi. Sosyal Medya Sitelerinde gizlilik ayarlarınızı nasıl özelleştirebileceğiniz hakkında bilgi için lütfen onların gizlilik yardım kılavuzlarına ve kullanım koşullarına bakın. VERİ SAKLAMA Geniş anlamda, Bilgilerinizi yalnızca bu Gizlilik Politikasında açıklanan amaçlar için gerekli olduğu sürece saklayacağız. Bu, saklama sürelerinin Bilginin türüne ve Bilgileri ilk etapta toplama nedenimize göre değişeceği anlamına gelir. Örneğin, Tekliflerimizin size sunulmasıyla ilgili bazı Bilgiler, finans ve vergiyle ilgili çeşitli yasal yükümlülüklere uymak için birkaç yıl boyunca saklanacaktır. Yasal yükümlülüklerimize ve Bilgileri saklamak için ticari bir ihtiyaç olup olmadığına bağlı olarak, farklı Bilgi kategorileri için çeşitli saklama sürelerini belirleyen ayrıntılı dahili saklama politikalarımız bulunmaktadır. Bir saklama süresi sona erdikten sonra, yasal iddiaların oluşturulması, uygulanması veya savunulması için gerekli olmadıkça, Bilgiler güvenli bir şekilde silinir. Geçerli saklama süreleri hakkında daha fazla bilgi için aşağıda belirtilen iletişim yöntemlerini kullanarak bizimle iletişime geçmelisiniz. BİREYSEL HAK TALEPLERİ Belirli koşullar altında, aşağıdaki taleplerden bir veya daha fazlasını yerine getirmemizi isteme hakkınız vardır. Bunu yapmadan önce sizden kimlik kanıtı veya diğer ek bilgileri isteyebiliriz. Erişim ve düzeltme hakkı: Bilgilerinizin bir kopyası ile birlikte elimizde bulunan Bilgilerin ayrıntılarını ve Bilgilerinizdeki hataların düzeltilmesini talep edebilirsiniz. Silme hakkı ("unutulma hakkı"): Belirli durumlarda Bilgilerinizin silinmesini isteme hakkı. Belirli durumlarda, özellikle bu Bilgileri saklamak için yasal bir yükümlülüğümüz olduğunda (örn. düzenleyici raporlama amaçları için) veya örneğin size sağlamaya devam etmemizi istediğiniz durumlarda, bazı Bilgi türlerini silemeyebiliriz. bir Teklifle ve Bilgilerin işlenmesi, o Teklifin sağlanması için gereklidir. Pazarlama iletişimi ve üçüncü taraflarla paylaşım. Size, bizden belirli pazarlama iletişimleri alma ve doğrudan pazarlama amaçları için güvenilir ortaklarla Bilgi paylaşımımıza ilişkin tercihlerinizi ifade etme fırsatı sunuyoruz. Daha fazla bilgi için lütfen aşağıdaki "Reklam Seçenekleri" bölümüne bakın. Taşınabilirlik hakkı: Bazı durumlarda Bilgilerinizi dijital formatta alma veya doğrudan başka bir kontrolöre iletme hakkı (teknik olarak mümkün olduğunda). İtiraz hakkı: (özel durumunuzla ilgili gerekçelerle) Bilgilerinizin doğrudan pazarlama amaçları da dahil olmak üzere meşru menfaatlerimiz temelinde işlenmesine itiraz etme hakkı. Rızayı geri çekme hakkı: Bir rızaya dayalı olarak herhangi bir Bilginin işlenmesiyle ilgili olarak rızanızı istediğiniz zaman geri çekebilirsiniz. Bu hakları kullanma talebini duruma göre değerlendireceğiz. Geçerli veri koruma mevzuatında sağlanan ilgili muafiyetler nedeniyle yasal olarak bir talebe uymak zorunda olmadığımız durumlar olabilir. Bazı durumlarda bu, onayınızı geri çekseniz bile Bilgilerinizi saklayabileceğimiz anlamına gelebilir. Bu hakları kullanmak veya Veri Koruma Görevlimizle iletişime geçmek için lütfen bireysel haklar talep portalımız aracılığıyla bir talep gönderin. ÇEREZLER VE DİĞER TEKNİK BİLGİLER Dijital Hizmetlerimizi ziyaret ettiğinizde, biz, üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcılar ve ortaklar, (i) Dijital Hizmetlerimizi sağlamak, geliştirmek, sürdürmek, kişiselleştirmek, korumak ve iyileştirmek ve içerikleri (ii) Dijital Hizmetlerimizin kullanımını ve performansını ve bunlar üzerinde görüntülenen veya onlar tarafından veya onlar aracılığıyla sunulan herhangi bir reklamı analiz etmek ve raporlamak dahil olmak üzere analizler gerçekleştirir (iii) dolandırıcılık ve diğer yasa dışı faaliyetlere karşı koruma, tanımlama ve önleme (iv) Kullanıcılarımızın grupları veya kategorileri (reklam hedef kitleleri dahil) hakkında toplu veriler oluşturmak ve (v) bizim için, ortaklarımız ve üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcılar için Tekliflerimiz veya tekliflerimizle ilgili reklamları sunmak, hedeflemek, teklif etmek, pazarlamak veya kişiselleştirmek için müşterilerimiz ve ortaklarımız (bir reklamı ne sıklıkta göreceğinizi sınırlama dahil). Çerez Açıklaması Web Sitesi Tercihleri Detaylar Gerekli çerezler Bu çerezler, temel web sitesi işlevselliğini etkinleştirmek için gereklidir Kesinlikle gerekli çerezler veya benzer teknolojiler: Dijital Hizmetlerimizde dolaşabilmenizi ve güvenli alanlara erişim gibi özelliklerini kullanabilmenizi sağlamak için gereklidirler. Bu tanımlama bilgilerini devre dışı bırakırsanız, Dijital Hizmetlerin bazı veya tüm özellikleri çalışmayabilir. Performans çerezleri Bu çerezler, performansı ölçebilmemiz ve iyileştirebilmemiz için Dijital Hizmetlerimizin kullanımını analiz etmemize olanak tanır. Performans çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Trafiği analiz edebilmemiz, kullanıcıların etkileşimlerini anlayabilmemiz ve ilgili Dijital Hizmeti iyileştirebilmemiz için Dijital Hizmetlerimizi nasıl kullandığınız hakkında bilgi toplarlar. E-postalarımız ve haber bültenlerimiz, size gönderdiklerimizle nasıl etkileşim kurduğunuzu bize bildiren bir 'web pikseli' içerebilir. Oyunlar için bu teknolojiler, başarılarınız, özelliklerin kullanımı ve diğer oyun içi etkinlikler dahil olmak üzere oyununuz hakkında bilgi toplar. Bu amaçla kendi çerezlerini veya benzer teknolojilerini kullanabilen üçüncü taraf hizmet sağlayıcıları kullanabiliriz. İşlevsellik çerezleri İşlevsellik çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Bunlar, Dijital Hizmetlerimizin yaptığınız seçimleri (kullanıcı adınız veya bulunduğunuz bölge gibi) hatırlamasını ve kişiselleştirilmiş içerik dahil olmak üzere gelişmiş, daha kişiselleştirilmiş özellikler sunmasını sağlar. Ayrıca, video izlemek veya bir bloga yorum yapmak gibi istediğiniz Dijital Hizmetleri sağlamak için de kullanılabilirler. Reklam çerezleri Bu çerezler, reklam şirketleri tarafından ilgi alanlarınızla alakalı reklamlar sunmak için kullanılır. Sosyal medya çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Bunlar, Dijital Hizmetlerimiz aracılığıyla bir sosyal medya paylaşım düğmesi veya 'beğen' düğmesi kullanarak Bilgi paylaştığınızda veya Facebook veya Twitter gibi bir Sosyal Medya Sitesinde veya aracılığıyla hesabınızı bağladığınızda veya içeriğimizle etkileşim kurduğunuzda kullanılır. Sosyal Medya Sitesi, bunu yaptığınızı kaydedecektir ve bu Bilgi, özel hedef kitleler oluşturmak da dahil olmak üzere, hedefleme/reklamcılık faaliyetleriyle bağlantılı olabilir. Reklam çerezleri veya benzer teknolojiler: Dijital Hizmetlerimizden bazıları, hedeflenen reklamları sunmak için bir üçüncü taraf reklam ağını veya başka şirketlerimizi kullanabilir. Ayrıca Dijital Hizmetlerimizde ve Sosyal Medya Sitelerimizde göz atmanızı veya kullanımınızı takip etme yeteneğine de sahip olabilirler. Pazarlama iletişimi. Size, bizden belirli pazarlama iletişimleri almaya ilişkin tercihlerinizi ifade etme fırsatı sağlayabiliriz. Bu tercihleri güncellemek isterseniz, (i) ayarlarınızı düzenlemek için (özelliğin mevcut olduğu durumlarda) bizimle oluşturmuş olabileceğiniz bir hesaba giriş yapabilirsiniz. Aldığınız herhangi bir pazarlama e-postasında verilen 'abonelikten çıkma' talimatlarını da takip edebilirsiniz. Reklam seçenekleri. Kendi başımıza veya bağlı kuruluşlar veya üçüncü taraflarla birlikte çalışarak, zaman içinde Dijital Hizmetlerimizde ve İnternet üzerindeki üçüncü taraf web sitelerinde ve uygulamalarda reklamlar sunabilir ve veri toplama, raporlama, reklam yanıtı ölçümü ve site analizi ile meşgul olabiliriz. Biz, bağlı şirketlerimiz veya üçüncü taraflar, bu faaliyeti gerçekleştirmek için çerezler, web işaretçileri, pikseller, SDK'lar veya benzer teknolojiler kullanabiliriz. İlgi alanlarınızla daha alakalı reklamlar sunmaya yardımcı olmak için kullandığınız uygulamalar, ziyaret ettiğiniz web siteleri ve zaman içinde cihazlarınız ve tarayıcılarınız ile web siteleri, hizmetler ve uygulamalar hakkında diğer bilgileri alırlar. Dijital Hizmetler ve cihazlarınız ve tarayıcılarınız arasında. Bu tür reklamlara 'ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık' denir. Biz, bağlı şirketlerimiz veya üçüncü taraflar bu bilgileri, ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık ve araştırma, analiz, dahili operasyonlar, dolandırıcılığı önleme ve tüketici deneyimlerini geliştirme gibi diğer amaçlar için farklı tarayıcılarınızı ve cihazlarınızı ilişkilendirmek için de kullanabiliriz. Tercihlerinizi kendi rıza yönetimi platformumuz aracılığıyla yönetmenin yanı sıra, masaüstü veya mobil tarayıcınızda ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık hakkında daha fazla bilgi almak ve özdenetim programlarına katılan üçüncü taraflarca yapılan bu tür reklamlardan vazgeçmek için_cc781905- adresini ziyaret edin. 5cde-3194-bb3b-136bad5cf58d_ Çevrimiçi Seçenekleriniz if , the Avrupa Etkileşimli Dijital Reklamcılık İttifakı tarafından barındırılan AEA'da _cc-7891945-5 (EDAA); if in Avustralya'dan Avustralya Reklam Birliği'ne (ADAA); ve Kanada'da ise, the Kanada Dijital Reklamcılık İttifakına (DAAC). Kanada'daki mobil uygulamalarda ilgi alanına dayalı reklamcılık hakkında daha fazla bilgi edinmek ve DAAC'ın AppChoices programına katılan üçüncü tarafların bu tür reklamlarından vazgeçmek için lütfen DAAC araçları sayfasını ziyaret edin _cc781905-5cde Cihazınız için AppChoices sürümünü indirmek için -3194-bb3b-136bad5cf58d_ . Bu programlar aracılığıyla uyguladığınız herhangi bir devre dışı bırakma seçeneğinin, seçtiğiniz üçüncü şahıslar tarafından ilgi alanına dayalı reklamlar için geçerli olacağını, ancak yine de araştırma, analitik ve dahili operasyonlar dahil olmak üzere diğer amaçlar için Bilgi toplanmasına izin vereceğini unutmayın. Bu nedenle reklam almaya devam edebilirsiniz, ancak bu reklam ilgi alanlarınızla daha az alakalı olabilir. Mobil cihazınıza ve işletim sisteminize bağlı olarak daha fazla seçeneğiniz olabilir. Örneğin, çoğu cihaz işletim sistemi (örneğin, Apple telefonlar için iOS, Android cihazlar için Android ve Microsoft cihazlar için Windows), uyarlanmış uygulama içi reklamların yayınlanmasının nasıl sınırlandırılacağı veya önleneceği konusunda kendi talimatlarını sağlar. Bu özellikler ve bunların özel uygulama içi reklamlara nasıl uygulanacağı hakkında daha fazla bilgi edinmek için ilgili işletim sistemlerinin destek materyallerini ve/veya gizlilik ayarlarını inceleyebilirsiniz. Kesin konum bilgisi. Mobil uygulamalarımız aracılığıyla mobil cihazınızdan kesin konum bilgilerinin toplanmasını etkinleştirmek veya devre dışı bırakmak için mobil cihaz ayarlarınıza erişebilir ve bu toplamayı sınırlandırmayı seçebilirsiniz. ULUSLARARASI TRANSFERLER Uluslararası olarak faaliyet gösteriyoruz ve Bilgilerinizi kullanımımızla ilgili bazı süreçler, Bilgilerinizin yasal koruma düzeyinin farklı olabileceği ülkeler de dahil olmak üzere, Bilgilerinizin bulunduğunuz ülke dışındaki ülkelerde saklanmasını veya işlenmesini gerektirecektir ve bununla ilgili olarak daha az yasal hakka sahip olabileceğiniz durumlarda. Bilgileriniz özellikle, bazı sistemlerimizin bulunduğu Amerika Birleşik Devletleri'ne aktarılabilir ve burada işlenebilir. Ancak, Bilgilerinizi bir ülke veya bölge dışına her aktardığımızda, geçerli yasal gerekliliklere uymak için gerekli adımları attığımızdan emin olacağız. Bu nedenle, gerektiğinde, uygun sözleşme mekanizmalarını kullanarak veya Bağlayıcı Şirket Kurallarının kabulü de dahil olmak üzere onaylanmış bir uluslararası veri aktarım mekanizmasına katılan hizmet sağlayıcılara güvenerek uygun korumaların uygulanmasını sağlayacağız. GÜNCELLEMELERLE İLGİLİ BİLDİRİM Zaman zaman bu Gizlilik Politikasını güncelleyebiliriz. Sitelerimize bir bildirim yerleştirerek herhangi bir önemli değişiklik hakkında sizi bilgilendireceğiz. Güncel olmanız için bu politikayı periyodik olarak kontrol etmenizi ve gözden geçirmenizi öneririz. ŞİKAYETLER Sorgunuzu nasıl ele aldığımızdan memnun değilseniz, Veri Koruma Yetkilinize şikayette bulunma hakkınız olabilir. Bu Gizlilik Politikası en son 31 Temmuz 2022 tarihinde güncellenmiştir. © Turkuaz Bay Topluluğu. Tüm hakları Saklıdır. Top

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